Desanto eligibility

RoarLions1

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May 11, 2012
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Very glad you posted this. I'm not an authority on autism. That said, I deal with them on a weekly basis. In my world of farriery, I do a good number of therapeutic horses. They are specifically used for children with autism. You are absolutely correct regarding the degree of autism. It's not necessarily about being autistic, but about the frustration that comes with being autistic. It make some lash out due to that frustration. That's exactly why animals, particularly horses, are used for these children. It challenges them to think and progress, while still dealing with challenges. I've also seen a number of children lash out at the horses. Nothing frustrates a human more than a horse. It's precisely why these horses are so well trained and specifically selected for their tolerance of humans. Nothing puts a smile on the face of an autistic child like a horse. Well, other than my shoeing companion, my dog Joker. 🐕
The horses used for therapeutic riding are special. Any size, but gentleness is needed. Our horse, that both our daughters rode for years was just such a horse. He was donated to be used for the purpose of helping special needs individuals (i.e. therapeutic rides). As sad as we were (he was awesome with my kids when they were young -- a long time ago) to give him up, it was to an awesome cause.

Your post, hotshoe, reminded me of some great times :).
 

Hotshoe

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Feb 15, 2012
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This is so great. My younger boy just started hippotherapy and he had a blast. He had ridden once before - while the other kids shied away, he got right up on the horse (using steps), so we knew he would like it, but he was in heaven. They did a variety of motor skill games from the saddle including cornhole of a sort. He even wanted to go faster so they got the horse to trot. He periodically leaned forward and hugged the horse. He’s going back on Tuesday and I’m taking a vacation day to see it in person.
This was kind of a trial run for my older boy who is far more skittish. He recently was approved for a variety of free therapies, and hippotherapy was one of them. It might take some effort to get him in the saddle, but still.

Thanks for doing what you do and you hit the nail on the head with a lot of these kids re: their frustration. Imagine being trapped in your own mind having thoughts you want to express, but you can’t. It can be torture for my boys.
That's awesome. One of my barns also works with adults, a number of them being vets with PTSD. We have tried everything through COVID to be able to keep these folks coming to the barn. A number of volunteers got worried about getting sick and stopped helping. Things are good now, but there were several months where we literally broke the law still attending these vets. These vets need the horses as much if not more than the children.
 

NoVaLion2

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Feb 22, 2018
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Very glad you posted this. I'm not an authority on autism. That said, I deal with them on a weekly basis. In my world of farriery, I do a good number of therapeutic horses. They are specifically used for children with autism. You are absolutely correct regarding the degree of autism. It's not necessarily about being autistic, but about the frustration that comes with being autistic. It make some lash out due to that frustration. That's exactly why animals, particularly horses, are used for these children. It challenges them to think and progress, while still dealing with challenges. I've also seen a number of children lash out at the horses. Nothing frustrates a human more than a horse. It's precisely why these horses are so well trained and specifically selected for their tolerance of humans. Nothing puts a smile on the face of an autistic child like a horse. Well, other than my shoeing companion, my dog Joker. 🐕
My son starting riding when he was about 5... He turned 30 last week. Something about the motion and how it affects proprioception (body awareness) that is very calming. They use them for Vets as well quite a bit now. [EDIT: just saw your subsequent post. :) ]
 

NoVaLion2

Well-Known Member
Feb 22, 2018
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668
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The horses used for therapeutic riding are special. Any size, but gentleness is needed. Our horse, that both our daughters rode for years was just such a horse. He was donated to be used for the purpose of helping special needs individuals (i.e. therapeutic rides). As sad as we were (he was awesome with my kids when they were young -- a long time ago) to give him up, it was to an awesome cause.

Your post, hotshoe, reminded me of some great times :).
There was a horse, Harmony, that my son used to ride that was very particular... She did NOT want you on her back if you weren't comfortable being there. The therapists only put a very few select riders on her. My son, who has always had really good balance, always seemed to enjoy riding Harmony more than the others. Harmony was also VERY territorial; if any other horse got close she would kick them. o_O
 
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wrstlrev

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Feb 2, 2013
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Sure. Pretending a loose cannon who makes violent threats toward reporters and shows zero sportsmanship toward opposition, does so because he is autistic, when not only has he not been officially diagnosed as autistic, but also no medical proof had been provided that autism leads to violent threats and outbursts.
Did you watch the close of even one of his matches? As opposed to your assertion that he, "shows zero sportsmanship toward opposition," I don't know how he could have shown better sportsmanship, seeking to shake hands with each opponent and expressing respect to each of them.
 

mjmirv

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Jun 15, 2001
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giphy.gif
 

McScoreley

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Feb 24, 2019
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They aren't kicking him off the team lol. Worst case scenario for ADS is he's suspended until next January and misses Fall duals and Midlands, AKA the Montell Marion.
 
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Larryrise

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Feb 3, 2021
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This means Murin back at 149 where they didn't score many points. They might have been better off there if he moved on.
 

MVPFAN

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Mar 10, 2003
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This means Murin back at 149 where they didn't score many points. They might have been better off there if he moved on.
I haven't seen even a puff of smoke regarding anything other than the punishment already given happening. That aside, I don't see any relevance to ADS and Murin being back at 149. Murin may not be the most talented guy ever but he gives all he has and wrestles people tough. He was 1 OT td from being at least 6th this year.
 

McScoreley

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Feb 24, 2019
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Murin reminds me of our very own Cutch. Top 10 guy who is a team leader, a smart wrestler and always wrestled hard. Beat his share of podium guys in his career. Cutch quarter slid out twice also. Murin still has 2 more years, remains to be seen if he can break through. 149 wasn't particularly deep this year. He might be better off at 141 after Eierman leaves. Tbh, I'd root for Murin if there weren't team implications.
 

RoarLions1

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May 11, 2012
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Murin reminds me of our very own Cutch. Top 10 guy who is a team leader, a smart wrestler and always wrestled hard. Beat his share of podium guys in his career. Cutch quarter slid out twice also. Murin still has 2 more years, remains to be seen if he can break through. 149 wasn't particularly deep this year. He might be better off at 141 after Eierman leaves. Tbh, I'd root for Murin if there weren't team implications.
I'll say one thing about Cutch's leadership ... very few wrestlers have come through the Penn State room that had the impact of Matt McCutcheon, leadership-wise. Despite wrestling disappointments, he rose above to have an impact few appreciate outside the program.
 

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