NCAA Role in college sports?

blion72

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Jan 1, 2010
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what do you think the role of the NCAA will be going forward?

In an interview on ESPN radio Ryan Day talked about the confusion NIL is causing because he said their compliance people were telling him that they are still subject to NCAA governance. Raised several questions:
  • Will the NCAA have any jurisdiction on any of college sports (i.e. could they pull another penalty like they did on Penn State)?
  • If NCAA has no jurisdiction, will they continue to exist for any reason? i.e. why would the schools want to continue to fund them under the contract they have now?
  • If there is not NCAA, will their be any governance on NIL? We seem to have legislatures in several states drafting laws independently on what is an interstate issue.
  • Day was worried that NIL could be used for recruiting by paying to sign with blanket offers. Phil actually discussed that on his show today.
  • Day also mentioned that he wanted to see the NIL $$$ spread around, which means he does not understand the $$$ are between who is paying and the player directly - not shared.
  • Day also said they were "standing up" an organization to support NIL with legal, financial and compliance staffing. This sounds like a serious budget for something the school has no role in. Another item to add to tuition cost.
Are we headed to a situation with no NCAA or governance = wild west anything goes? players could technically not even enroll in the university. A player could quit their team one week and play for another the next week. essentially a pro team with no connection to the school they represent, and no authority by the school, since they are not signing the players to contracts for pay. Every sport could just be on its own with its own money, and the ones that cannot survive just fail. Not sure what would prevent this? not a fan of NCAA, but they have had the role of governance on college sports. The think that keeps the NCAA's role is that the athletes must be students. we end that an not sure how this is going to work.
 

Nitt1300

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Nov 2, 2008
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Just as the IOC used to control the Olympics, the NCAA used to control what we still laughingly refer to as "college" sports.

Since both long ago ceased to be about anything but revenue, the law of supply and demand is the only controlling entity.
 
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BobPSU92

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The ncaa will continue to ensure compliance, equity, and the prioritization of academics in intercollegiate athletics.






funny-laugh.gif
 

Wallace Breen

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Are we headed to a situation with no NCAA or governance = wild west anything goes? players could technically not even enroll in the university. A player could quit their team one week and play for another the next week. essentially a pro team with no connection to the school they represent, and no authority by the school, since they are not signing the players to contracts for pay. Every sport could just be on its own with its own money, and the ones that cannot survive just fail. Not sure what would prevent this? not a fan of NCAA, but they have had the role of governance on college sports. The think that keeps the NCAA's role is that the athletes must be students. we end that an not sure how this is going to work.

If the SEC has their way, it will be more like the wild west than a controlled environment but the Big Ten is much more powerful than most people realize and can easily blunt their efforts. With that said, the scenario you outline is not going to happen. The NCAA will still be a thing and will still manage player eligibility, monitor academic achievement (athletes can't participate without maintaining minimum eligibility, taking and passing classes and the schools have to maintain Title IX compliance) and the like. Schools are setting up NIL offices as a CYA move. It isn't too long until their are tax implications related to athlete scholarships in relation to NIL agreements. I give it five years until at least some of those that sign NIL agreements will be required to pay taxes on their scholarships. Most D1 scholarships are worth 90K a year or more. It is only a matter of time until it is interpreted as taxable income.
 

Ian

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NCAA has been sliding towards irrelevance ever since their inappropriate condemnation of PSU following the Sandusky crap. They will be dead in several years as college sports becomes less and less amateur. Fox and ESPN along with the shoe and apparel companies are taking over because they are the money behind college sports.
 

NittPicker

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Like many people, I see the day coming soon when many of the football schools will break away to form their own alliance. The NCAA has governing power because those schools allow it. There isn't a law which ensures the existence of the NCAA to oversee collegiate athletics. The NCAA would survive if the football programs said "eff you" and left. If basketball did the same, the NCAA would simply be the NAIA with different initials.
 
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Art

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If the SEC has their way, it will be more like the wild west than a controlled environment but the Big Ten is much more powerful than most people realize and can easily blunt their efforts. With that said, the scenario you outline is not going to happen. The NCAA will still be a thing and will still manage player eligibility, monitor academic achievement (athletes can't participate without maintaining minimum eligibility, taking and passing classes and the schools have to maintain Title IX compliance) and the like. Schools are setting up NIL offices as a CYA move. It isn't too long until their are tax implications related to athlete scholarships in relation to NIL agreements. I give it five years until at least some of those that sign NIL agreements will be required to pay taxes on their scholarships. Most D1 scholarships are worth 90K a year or more. It is only a matter of time until it is interpreted as taxable income.

The tuition portion of an athletic scholarship is not subject to tax and will likely never will be. Otherwise, tuition scholarships for non-athletes would also become taxable.

The other elements of athletic, as well as non-athletic, scholarships (room, board, stipends, etc) are taxable and have been for who knows how long.

Earnings from NIL are subject to taxation immediately, just as the amounts other students earn from jobs like work-study. Students can receive scholarships earn money through work-study and the twain to not meet as far as the IRS is concerned.
 
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Wallace Breen

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The tuition portion of an athletic scholarship is not subject to tax and will likely never will be. Otherwise, tuition scholarships for non-athletes would also become taxable.

The other elements of athletic, as well as non-athletic, scholarships (room, board, stipends, etc) are taxable and have been for who knows how long.

Earnings from NIL are subject to taxation immediately, just as the amounts other students earn from jobs like work-study. Students can receive scholarships earn money through work-study and the twain to not meet as far as the IRS is concerned.
In certain situations (those that receive NIL deals will likely fit the bill), scholarships above a certain limit ($5,800ish per year) becomes taxable income. If interpreted properly, a student athlete who is profiting off of their status as a member of a not for profit in the form of NIL monies will very likely trigger taxation would would apply to the entire package. It would be highly unjust from a tax perspective for an athlete (all PSU athletes receive nearly a 6 figure package, football players do receive a 6 figure package) to be able to profit from their status as a member of a sports team and not pay an appropriate amount of tax on the the benefits that are incurred by membership.
 

Art

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In certain situations (those that receive NIL deals will likely fit the bill), scholarships above a certain limit ($5,800ish per year) becomes taxable income. If interpreted properly, a student athlete who is profiting off of their status as a member of a not for profit in the form of NIL monies will very likely trigger taxation would would apply to the entire package. It would be highly unjust from a tax perspective for an athlete (all PSU athletes receive nearly a 6 figure package, football players do receive a 6 figure package) to be able to profit from their status as a member of a sports team and not pay an appropriate amount of tax on the the benefits that are incurred by membership.

That's bullshit, all of it.
 

Nitwit

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Jul 18, 2001
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NCAA has been sliding towards irrelevance ever since their inappropriate condemnation of PSU following the Sandusky crap. They will be dead in several years as college sports becomes less and less amateur. Fox and ESPN along with the shoe and apparel companies are taking over because they are the money behind college sports.
And the beer companies too.
 

NittPicker

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Here you go.

"Each of the appointees offers important insight on the transformation that's needed for the future," NCAA President Mark Emmert said. "The time is now for substantive change. And future change must focus on serving student-athletes."

Yeah, right. At this point I think the focus of the NCAA suits is to protect their ride on the gravy train and keep their six and seven figure salaries rolling in. Keeping college athletics strictly amateur?? That ship has now sailed. Ensuring academic integrity?? Emmert and friends stopped caring about that when UNC stepped in it since they didn't want to damage the popularity of March Madness. Protecting the health and well being of student athletes?? The apathy toward OSU, Michigan, and MSU proves that's not really important either.

Given all that, what exactly would the NCAA do to focus on serving student athletes?? The organization is obsolete and useless.