Has anyone used 23andme dna tests....

Discussion in 'BWI / McAndrew Board' started by RandyL, May 31, 2018.

  1. RandyL

    RandyL Well-Known Member
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    or any others?

    I have been thinking about having my dna checked.
    Maybe by more than one company to see how the results compare.
     
  2. LionDeNittany

    LionDeNittany Well-Known Member
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    I have. I did it with my daughter. Independently.

    They immediately matched us up.

    My results were exactly what i expected which was interesting since it was proven.

    Ldn
     
  3. CentexLion

    CentexLion Well-Known Member
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    Wife got it for me for my birthday last year (23 and me). Actually, pretty cool looking at the data. My family swears that my great grandmother was Native American, but that came out zero in the results. Surprise was a bit of Italian and also Northern African, which we all thought was none. Interesting supper table discussions though. Interesting read that quite a few people believe they have Native American ties that the DNA does not support. Lots of surveys to take as well if you'd like, which helps them formulate the database. Traces all the way back to the Neanderthal locations.

    Pretty cool that you get updates every now and then. Latest one was 4 items they are "linking" to genes. Alzheimers, Parkinsons, Some Cancers, and Celiac. I believe there are two genes each that are potentially linked to these syndromes. Just because you have a positive link, doesn't mean you have/will get it. It showed me as having one of the genes linked to Celiac (gluten free diets) which my daughter has tested positive for and is on a special diet.

    Again, pretty cool, and a good way to spend some time researching for fun stuff. If I was a hypochondriac, this would probably not be a good thing.

    Also, if my data can be used to catch a bad relative (and there are a few bad apples out there), I'm all for it :)
     
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  4. Cletus11

    Cletus11 Well-Known Member
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    yes, whole family did it. recently got contacted by a second or third cousin who has some level of DNA match and said was adopted and looking for original family. He named the exact town my entire mother's side of family grew up in. So now contemplating on how to respond considering is this some family secret.

    As for the test, my wife has a cousin who is a micro-biologist. He said 23andme is the best and that is why he recommended it and did it himself for whatever that is worth.
     
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  5. GastonLion

    GastonLion Well-Known Member
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    My son gave it to us for Christmas and the results were as both of us expected. They also provide other information and services that are helpful and interesting.
     
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  6. fairgambit

    fairgambit Well-Known Member
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    I have been told I come from a royal heritage. My wife says that must be true since I can be a royal pain in the ass sometimes. :) Anyway, I don't want a test suggesting otherwise.
     
  7. massimoManca II

    massimoManca II Well-Known Member
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    I have been sending my DNA out in the mail but have received no responses*
     
  8. PSU87

    PSU87 Well-Known Member
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    Is it worth having your DNA on file just to find out where you're from?
    Companies can't keep your financial info from getting hacked. The only way someone is getting my DNA is with a court order. o_O
     
  9. Obliviax

    Obliviax Well-Known Member
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    my daughter is adopted from Europe. I want to do this for her, at some point. Also, we have no medical tendencies due to not having medical history of her biological ancestors. Does it give any health related tendencies or direction?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  10. bplionfan

    bplionfan Well-Known Member
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/what-you-re-giving-away-those-home-dna-tests-n824776

    https://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/1031360/online-genetic-testing-exposed-scam

    Online genetic testing exposed as a scam
    No lifeguard in gene pool shocka

    SENDING YOUR BODILY fluids off to online DNA testing centres probably won’t bring you any closer to solving the mysteries in your family tree, according to an undercover investigation.

    Computer magazine, Which? Computing, skeptically put several online DNA ancestor mapping services to the test, and to say they got some ‘genetic variations’ in the results would be putting it rather mildly.

    Paying between £75 and £510 a whack, one male volunteer’s DNA sample was sent to various companies who, in return for the cash, promised to send back a scrappy piece of paper revealing all there was to know about the samplers’ ancestry and rich, cultured heritage.


    One of the companies, 23andMe, a ‘personal genomics startup’ which promises personal analysis of nearly 600,000 genetic variations linked to disease and other things, like ancestry, height, and eye colour, seemed a bit reluctant to commit itself to a clear cut result, saying the DNA sample came “from somebody of Polish, Arab or Irish decent”. Narrows it down a bit, to be sure.

    Two other companies DNA Solutions and Oxford Ancestors came up with different results for the same genetic sample, a great scientific feat, considering that one’s DNA is a pretty unique blueprint.

    As if being a total waste of money and completely inaccurate wasn’t enough, Which? Computing also reckoned that the privacy clauses in the small print held some serious flaws. For example, the firms reserved the right to store samples of DNA for up to 20 years, share data with other organisations that conduct similar research (*cough*, pharmaceuticals, *cough*) and share results online. Since there isn’t yet a code of practice or regulatory body in place for this kind of DNA testing, its pretty much anyone’s bet what a sample could in fact be used for.


    The editor of Which? Computing, Sarah Kid-you-not Kidner, warned “people need to be wary of DNA testing services. It’s unlikely that any of the information we received would help in researching a family tree. In fact, the results are so vague it’s almost the equivalent of telling someone what their star sign is.”

    In short, if you’re going to cough up £510 for a little kit that asks you to kindly gob in a plastic bottle, send it off, and expect enlighteningly accurate results, then may we politely suggest you contemplate adding a healthy dose of chlorine to your gene pool?


    https://www.livescience.com/2084-dna-kits-secrets-scientific-scam.html
     
  11. RandyL

    RandyL Well-Known Member
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    Thanks all...I think.
     
  12. masterbaker65

    masterbaker65 Well-Known Member
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    Ever think about what happens with your DNA data? Your DNA information will be sold. Big Pharma is loving this company.
     
  13. kgilbert78

    kgilbert78 Well-Known Member
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    I've done it with Family Tree DNA. One of the issues for ethnic studies is that you have to have people of your ethnic heritage get tested. The one that's known to be iffy is German. The reason? Genealogy is under a bit of a cloud there due to the Nazi usage during the Third Reich--so not that many Germans from Germany have been tested. It all depends on the database the companies have assembled, which is why you can get different ethnic info from different testing companies.

    My numbers were 70% British Isles and Ireland (which matched what I expected given that most of my dad's family is old New England with one Irish great grandmother) *but* 21% Eastern Europe and 7% Southeast Europe--which does not match--but I am about 30% German. We have good records for the German part plus known German speaking great grandparents.

    I do have two matches with children of first cousins--one on each side, plus a pair of 5th cousins who match up with my Burnham ancestry.
     
  14. interrobang

    interrobang Well-Known Member
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    Yep. I don't trust at all what these companies will do with the DNA.
     
  15. Schizophrenic_MackDaddy

    Schizophrenic_MackDaddy Well-Known Member
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    I did.

    Mine came back and said I was human. That's why I'm a Humanist.

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Fac

    Fac Well-Known Member
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    If they want my DNA they'll have to scrape my bedroom ceiling.
     
  17. Nitwit97

    Nitwit97 Well-Known Member
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    I thinking this as well. First they give us devices that allow to listen to personal conversations. Now they have made it trendy to have your DNA submitted and on file. You will also notice that many people will have traces of heritage that they did not know about (whether true or not), in order to make you feel sympathetic or have you align with certain heritages. Another manipulation tool.
     
  18. NewEra 2014

    NewEra 2014 Well-Known Member
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    Obli, you have two options with 23andme (as of 2 years ago). You can get just the ancestry data, or you can pay a bit more and also get the medical/health data. I got the ancestry data for my wife a couple of years ago, and she loved it. They sent a nice ancestry report out to her. I didn't get the health data for her--she didn't want to know of any bad genetic news. But based on my experience with the 23andme ancestry data, they will probably do a good job with the health data as well.
     
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  19. IANit

    IANit Well-Known Member
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    That article's over 10 years old. Since data from these tests has been used to solve high-profile murders recently I'd say there's enough critical mass that there would be at least some value in tracking down a family tree if that's your goal, though the other concerns raised may still be valid.
     
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  20. WestSideLion

    WestSideLion Well-Known Member
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    Half Italian and half Caveman? :)
     
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  21. joeparules

    joeparules Well-Known Member
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    In hindsight, I wish I had this done for my daughters for a reason some might think is stupid. Both of my daughters started their PSU education at Altoona despite knowing a classmate with similar credentials (SAT/GPA) being accepted to main campus. In both cases the classmate was of an ethnic heritage and checked it on the application. Now I have no idea if we have anything other than European (mostly German and Irish) genes and/or if it would have gotten them into main campus, but it would have been worth the money to know for sure. Especially my younger one since she started at Rutgers after not getting accepted at UP despite a 3.9 GPA.

    Oh well, they both enjoyed their time at Altoona and made great friends while I saved a little money in tuition.
     
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  22. MtNittany

    MtNittany Well-Known Member
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    I agree. There is something Orwellian about this that just makes me sit back and watch, not participate. This is a far reach - but imagine the DNA of a prized AU Freshman RB showing up in documents following a rape investigation in Tuscaloosa. Or a political candidate's DNA suddenly matches some cold case from 30 years ago. Hmmm...

    To me, it's akin to giving the world your signature w/ carte blanche.

    Edit: After reading NittanyLionFan's post - were I adopted, and I wanted to know my ancestry then it would be a no-brainer.
     
    22 MtNittany, May 31, 2018
    Last edited: May 31, 2018
  23. Ranger Dan

    Ranger Dan Well-Known Member
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    My twin sister and I were adopted at birth. A few years ago I did the ancestry DNA test. I was disappointed in the results because they were very vague. 25 percent Western Europe, as opposed to the village, Provence, or at least country some of my ancestors came from. It also didn’t have any health details. My wife bought me the 23andme test kit for Christmas this year and I did it. I was provided with slightly better detail about my ancestry, but more importantly a good bit of health history. From that perspective, I was very satisfied with the 23andme test.
     
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  24. Ian

    Ian Well-Known Member
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    You get the best of both worlds at while at Toona! Small campus academics during the week and big campus social scene on weekends. It worked for my daughter, too. It’s Penn State!
     
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  25. NittanyLionFan

    NittanyLionFan Well-Known Member
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    I did an AncestryDNA test several years ago, primarily out of interest in my ethnicity. Like a few others that chimed in here, I was adopted (at birth) and had no knowledge of my biological family (but had become the family genealogist for my adopted family - i.e., my family!). Other than an initial return that indicated a lot of Scandinavian that was later revised to English (as others have mentioned, the databases are improved over time), it ended up being pretty accurate. I know this as the test, through the cousin matches that it provides, ended up allowing me to connect with both sides of my biological family. And, based on building those family trees, the ethnicity estimates are pretty spot on in my case! For my England and Irish roots, it even isolated the estimate to particular regions (southern England outside of London, northern Ireland) which I have confirmed through genealogical research (along with Scottish and Italian). Pretty cool. For any genealogists, it is also helpful to confirm family tree research (i.e., find a distant cousin through DNA, map the relationship through records).

    I don't have a recommendation for AncestryDNA versus 23andme (or others). I have heard good things about both. I used Ancestry as I was already using the service for genealogy (and can link my DNA profile to my record, which helps with identifying cousins). I recognize that there are potential privacy concerns, but until they start making clones... ;-)
     
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  26. Aardvark86

    Aardvark86 Well-Known Member
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    There are whole boards for things like this on fb. For example tons of people genetically related thru a SoCal spermicide bank prolific donor. Weird stuff.
     
  27. Aardvark86

    Aardvark86 Well-Known Member
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    I am not a believer in medical participation in these as the genetic therapies aren’t developed enough for the diagnostics to be helpful.
     
  28. Ski

    Ski Well-Known Member
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    I did mine on Ancestry for genealogy purposes, but while it helped possibly identify cousins that were related somehow, I am no closer to making a definitive link to them then I was before the testing.

    My grandparents came to the US from southern Poland, a stone's throw from Slovakia, at the turn of the 20th century. With the partitioning of Poland and two world wars about the only records left are from the churches and most of those used the people's Latin names, not their Polish names.

    Then you throw in the changes of spelling of first and last names once people emigrated to the US and it is really hard to be able to connect the dots. For example, one of my grandfathers' first name in Polish was Wojciech, but the Latin church records have it as Adalbert, and once he got to the US he went by George. Also, our last name comes from the name of the village and 1/3rd of the village uses the same last name. Wojciech Blahblahski in that village is like George Smith and it is hard to determine which one is which trying to separate them out 130 years later.

    Anyway, the test didn't tell me anything I didn't already know. But, I often wonder how many folks take those tests and find out they are related to the milk man's family and not "dear old dad".
     
  29. ClarkstonMark

    ClarkstonMark Well-Known Member
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    what do you fear?
     
  30. 83wuzme

    83wuzme Well-Known Member
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    Two concerns I would have about this business :
    1) Identical twins and triplets getting significantly different results with regard to ancestry. These people are clones, if the results are that different due the error margin, the ancestry test is probably a waste of money.
    2) The medical information in these tests is probably worth something to somebody who wouldn’t have your best interests in mind.
     
  31. Tom McAndrew

    Tom McAndrew Well-Known Member
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    ah, so after your wedding, you drove your wife to the reception (or to the honeymoon) in a XKE?
     
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  32. fairgambit

    fairgambit Well-Known Member
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    Only peasants drove in those days. I had a driver and it was a Bentley.

    OK, I won't lie. I did drive and it was a Dodge Dart. Not all royals are wealthy. :)
     
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  33. Aardvark86

    Aardvark86 Well-Known Member
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    Royal Tannenbaum’s
     
  34. LionDeNittany

    LionDeNittany Well-Known Member
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    Ha.

    The lower half.

    Ldn
     
  35. TheGLOV

    TheGLOV Well-Known Member
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    That's why we're here!

    [​IMG]
     
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  36. RandyL

    RandyL Well-Known Member
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    When you guys say that Ancestry "helped identify cousins..." do you mean they actually provided names/locations of people ??

    do you have to use the Ancestry pay genealogy site to take the dna test?
     
  37. TheGLOV

    TheGLOV Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]

    Mom! Dad!!

    :eek::D:eek:
     
  38. indynittany

    indynittany Well-Known Member
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    What does that mean, exactly?
     
  39. Class of 67

    Class of 67 Well-Known Member
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    I, my wife, and two children all took DNA tests through 23andme. Unlike some here, I'm not paranoid about inappropriate use of test results. Rather, for me, it was fun to learn new things about ancestry or confirm what I had thought. My confidence in 23and me was reinforced by my kids results compared to that of me and wife. I got the results I expected: virtually all European and primarily Germany/France. ( DNA testing matches you to geographic areas generally analogous to current country boundaries, at best, or less definitively to regions, e.g., North Africa.) Unexpectedly, my wife's results showed a very small amount of Native American. I researched her genealogy using resources available online and learned that her father had ancestry tracing to German Palatinates who settled in upstate NY in the early 1700s. They lived among Iroquois in the Mohawk Valley, where there was occasional intermarriage. Eventually a group of these Palatinate immigrants and offspring removed to south-central, PA, where they lived for generations into the 20th century.

    My wife's cousin used Ancestry.com and got results partially in conflict with my wife. He retested with 23andme and received results consistent with where they should have favorably compared. He discussed this in a phone call with an Ancestry rep in hopes of an explanation or offer for complementary retest. He was told they don't make mistakes! This soured him on Ancestry.

    23andme (and perhaps others) provide estimates of approximate time periods when certain ancestry was introduced into your blood line. Another aspect I like is you get periodic lists of persons related to you and the strength of that relationship. This only works for those who have given 23andme the authority to do that. On that note, my niece showed up on the list as my first cousin! I've no surprises from these relationship notifications, i.e., close relations of which I was not aware. I chose not to be alerted to disease susceptibility.
     
  40. Nitwit97

    Nitwit97 Well-Known Member
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    Plus one!

    The push on agendas and certain technologies in this world are certainly strange. Along with the Seats thread here. Notice the push to get populations into urban settings. People willingly submitting their DNA. Tell me you don’t believe they are already a step ahead in this, and that higher ups will not manipulate this. You would never willingly turn in your ATM password,
    But you would gladly provide your DNA!?!? I guarantee there are already reverse engineering mechanisms in place. I mean, they are solving old cases using DNA evidence. What’s to say they cannot frame someone with this same information. Now I know blood has been planted in cases , but imagine someone with a boatload of cash does something wrong, you don’t think they will have access to DNA to make them right. Let alone where this will go with further cloning, etc.

    Weird places we are heading toward, and the paste is out of the tube.

    Don’t even get me started in the ID chips that will be pressed in ya before too long. Injected into your hand, you can wave it and use it like a credit card or ID. . . You won’t be able to do commerce without it (read Revelations, same thing occurs - you will need a mark to do commerce). Cashless society means more tracking of your spending, your location, everything.
     
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