More to ignore, Book 91......

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Cloudflare cuts ties with notorious trolling and harassment site Kiwi Farms

Darrell Lucus

This weekend may have given us an enlightening example of what happens when the most deplorable of the deplorables get a dose of sunshine. On Friday afternoon, NBC News told the world about one of the worst sites on the Internet, Kiwi Farms. This outfit has orchestrated ugly trolling and harassment campaigns that have led to at least three suicides. Their latest campaign forced a Canadian trans activist to flee to the United Kingdom for safety—only to have them continue cyberstalking her there.

And yet, the company that protected Kiwi Farms from DDoS attacks, Cloudflare, refused to cut ties with them despite a Mount Everest-sized list of terms of service violations. But after the intensity of the spotlight led the Kiwi Farms trolls to ramp up their threats, Cloudflare cut the cord. While Kiwi Farms popped back up after finding a security provider desperate enough to host it, this noxious site has been put on notice—we surround them.

Kiwi Farms, founded by former 8chan administrator Josh Moon, has become infamous for using a trove of online data to dox and swat people because of their views on social issues. According to NBC News’ Ben Collins and Kat Tenbarge, trans people have become a particular target for this nest of deplorables.

The forum is a massive archive of sensitive information on their targets, which has been used to repeatedly harass them. Kiwi Farms’ most notorious section is titled “lolcows” and targets transgender people.
The archive often features social media pictures of their targets’ friends and family, along with contact information of their employers. The information is used in an effort to get their targets fired or socially isolated by spreading rumors that they are pedophiles or criminals.

This has led a number of experts to express concern that other far-right elements may copy Kiwi Farms’ tactics. Among them is 8chan founder Fredrick Brennan, who has spent years trying to take 8chan down due to its increasingly offensive and criminal content. Brennan believes Moon has made Kiwi Farms far worse than 8chan ever was “because he’s actually targeting specific people.” According to VICE France, at least three of Kiwi Farms’ targets have committed suicide.

Among those “specific people” being attacked by Kiwi Farms is Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, who was swatted last week by someone who identified as a Kiwi Farms user. I never thought I’d see the day that I’d feel any sympathy for the Mad Georgian, but this sort of behavior has no place in our political discourse, regardless of who does it. Still, it seems odd that Kiwi Farms came after one of the most viciously transphobic members of the House. Perhaps the monster created by the puppetmasters of the right is turning on those who created it.

This outfit has become so dangerous that according to a Twitter thread Collins dropped on Friday, a number of extremist researchers actually warned him against writing about it.



What pushed Collins to turn the hot lights on Kiwi Farms was the manner in which it has terrorized Canadian trans activist and Twitch streamer Clara “Keffals” Sorrenti. She ended up on Kiwi Farms’ shit list after she spoke out against the wave of anti-trans legislation in this country. After a Twitch user who spoke out against her got banned, Kiwi Farms users doxed her and her family. They also swatted her, claiming she was planning a mass shooting at the city hall of her hometown of London, Ontario. When police vowed to investigate the swatting, Kiwi Farms doxed the cops as well.

Sorrenti fled to a nearby hotel, only to have the trolls come after her after they identified her hiding place by cross-referencing the sheets on her bed. They then hacked her Uber account, as well as her family’s Uber accounts; Uber is in the process of reimbursing them for rafts of unauthorized charges. She then fled to Europe—only to have them track her there and bombard her with harassing phone calls. In response, Sorrenti started a campaign to get Cloudflare to cut ties with Kiwi Farms, which won the support of the Anti-Defamation League. The hashtags “#DropKiwiFarms” and “#CloudFlareProtectsTerrorists” started heavily trending over the past few days.

And yet, even after all this, Cloudflare initially refused to cut ties with Kiwi Farms even though its content was a prima facie violation of its Acceptable Hosting Policy. Specifically, Kiwi Farms’ stock in trade was “content that discloses sensitive personal information, incites or exploits violence against people or animals.”


In a lengthy statement on its blog posted on Wednesday, Cloudflare adopted a patently insulting rationale—dropping Kiwi Farms could put vulnerable people at risk.

Terminating security services for content that our team personally feels is disgusting and immoral would be the popular choice. But, in the long term, such choices make it more difficult to protect content that supports oppressed and marginalized voices against attacks.

This isn't hypothetical. Thousands of times per day we receive calls that we terminate security services based on content that someone reports as offensive. Most of these don’t make news. Most of the time these decisions don’t conflict with our moral views. Yet two times in the past we decided to terminate content from our security services because we found it reprehensible. In 2017, we terminated the neo-Nazi troll site The Daily Stormer. And in 2019, we terminated the conspiracy theory forum 8chan.
In a deeply troubling response, after both terminations we saw a dramatic increase in authoritarian regimes attempting to have us terminate security services for human rights organizations — often citing the language from our own justification back to us.

This led Cloudflare to conclude that cutting ties with sites that host objectionable content would be like a phone company dropping a customer because it doesn’t like what you say. Never mind that Kiwi Farms is targeting some of the most vulnerable people on the planet. The rate of suicide among LGBTQ youth has spiked dramatically in recent years.

But matters finally came to a head on Saturday night, when Cloudflare reversed course and pulled its services from Kiwi Farms. According to another post from Cloudflare, Kiwi Farms only has itself to blame.

We are also not taking this action directly because of the pressure campaign. While we have empathy for its organizers, we are committed as a security provider to protecting our customers even when they run deeply afoul of popular opinion or even our own morals. The policy we articulated last Wednesday remains our policy. We continue to believe that the best way to relegate cyberattacks to the dustbin of history is to give everyone the tools to prevent them.
However, as the pressure campaign escalated, so did the rhetoric on the Kiwifarms site. Feeling attacked, users of the site became even more aggressive. Over the last two weeks, we have proactively reached out to law enforcement in multiple jurisdictions highlighting what we believe are potential criminal acts and imminent threats to human life that were posted to the site.

Cloudflare claimed “specific, targeted threats over the last 48 hours” from Kiwi Farms made it clear that there was “an unprecedented emergency and imminent threat to human life.” Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince told The Washington Post that in his view, the threats were escalating faster than law enforcement could respond. For instance, Kiwi Farms users were posting the addresses of perceived foes and calling for them to be murdered. This led Prince and his team to conclude they had to make, as Cloudflare’s latest statement put it, “a dangerous decision that we are not comfortable with.” It had already pulled customizable error messages from Kiwi Farms after it swatted Greene, and pulled its remaining services on Saturday.

It’s hard to give Cloudflare credit for this. How is this decision more dangerous than people potentially being murdered or driven to suicide? Or, in the words of Harvard Law’s Alejandra Carabello, the prospect of others adopting Kiwi Farms’ tactics of “stochastic terror...being implemented as a part of the culture war,” to the point of bludgeoning LGBTQ people into silence?

Nevertheless, one of the worst outfits on the Internet was briefly forced offline before finding a company disreputable enough to provide security. It proves what Keffals said on Saturday night—this is but one battle.



And it’s a battle we may be fighting into 2024.
 
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Ten Thousan Marbles

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Where's the money? Rick Scott and the riddle of the NRSC's missing millions.

TheCriticalMind

What do you get when you combine the ex-CEO of the company that paid the stiffest penalty ever assessed — $1.7 billion — to settle the biggest-ever Medicare fraud in the nation’s history, with a team of ex-Trump operatives? The answer is a money-raising operation that has trouble making money or explaining where it went.

In November 2020, Senate Republicans elected Rick Scott — who had been a Senator for less than two years — to Chair the National Republican Senate Committee (N.R.S.C.). Before being a two-term Governor of Florida, Scott had founded a company that had grown from two rural hospitals into the world’s biggest healthcare concern — Hospital Corporation of America (HCA). This was enough to persuade Senators that he was the man for the job. Meanwhile, they ignored that Scott had been fired from the company for unethical financial practices after the Feds started investigating HCA for ripping off the government.

We should not be surprised. Bankruptcy, pussy grabbing, and fraud are no disqualifiers to prominent positions in the GOP. And the party has never been confused with a well-run, efficient operation — except when it comes to confirming disingenuous and doctrinaire Supreme Court justices.

But Scott’s casual relationship with honesty has proved disastrous for the N.R.S.C.’s finances. The New York Times has done an inciteful analysis of the failure of Scott’s gamble on new digital money-raising tactics. These initially proved profitable. But they later absorbed an increasing amount of the cash they were designed to raise. According to the paper,

Mr. Scott installed a new digital team, spearheaded by Trump veterans, and greenlit an enormous wave of spending on digital ads, not to promote candidates but to discover more small contributors. Soon, the committee was smashing fund-raising records. By the summer of 2021, Mr. Scott was boasting about “historic investments in digital fund-raising that are already paying dividends.”
A year later, some of that braggadocio has vanished — along with most of the money.

Overall, the campaign arm of Senate Republicans had collected $181.5 million by the end of July — but spent 95 percent of it.

How can this be? Here’s a clue. “Trump veterans”? No wonder the enterprise is floundering. The NYT further reports,

Gary Coby, Mr. Trump’s longtime digital director, is an adviser to the committee and is widely seen as the main behind-the-scenes influence on the N.R.S.C.’s current digital operations. Two of his companies, Direct Persuasion, a digital agency, and Opn Sesame, a texting firm, have been paid by the Senate committee more than $4.6 million combined. Two others that he has promoted, DirectSnd and Red Spark Strategy, have received another $9.2 million.

It is close to a truism that anyone who has had a longtime relationship with Trump is a crook. So Coby funneling campaign cash to his companies and cronies is par for the course. On top of the self-dealing, the way the N.R.S.C. raised cash was questionable. The Scott strategy involved sending millions of text messages with provocative questions, such as “Should Biden resign?” If the respondent wanted to reply, they were told to “Reply YES to donate”. Anyone who did would have $25 charged to the credit card associated with their phone number. Nowhere did it say where the money was going.

The tactic was so underhanded that WinRed, the GOP’s main donation-processing site, recently blocked the committee from engaging in the practice.

Donor fatigue set in quickly. As the Times further reported,

One internal N.R.S.C. budget document from earlier this year, obtained by The Times, shows that $23.3 million was poured into investments to find new donors between June 2021 and January 2022. In that time, the contributors the organization found gave $6.1 million — a more than $17 million deficit.

That is no way to run a railroad.

Adding to the malaise was the sense among Republicans that Scott was running the fund-raising operation to benefit his 2024 presidential ambitions. Wits referred to the N.R.S.C. as the “National Rick Scott Committee”.

Scott also chose Trump’s side in the Republican civil war between the 2020 loser and the Senate leader. Notably, he took exception to Mitch McConnell’s accurate assessment of the dismal candidates promoted by the treasonous ex-President. (DK’s Joan McCarter has an informative diary on the subject, Rick Scott kicks off final push to midterms by escalating his war with Mitch McConnell.)

Four months ago, the GOP was an odds-on favorite to take the Senate. Now there is a possibility that not only will the Democrats maintain control but will pick up seats. And if the Democrats hit the superfecta and keep control of the House, the Republican seas will run with blood.

The Orange Stain will blame McConnell. Kevin McCarthy's Speaker dream will become a nightmare of failure as Trump adds him to his enemies list. And the GOP will replay the Nazi's 'Night of the Long Knives.

 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Ukraine update: One of the oldest, ugliest weapons is still shaping much of what happens in this war

Mark Sumner

This is a war story that is literally as old as war stories.

When Abimelech was told that Shechem was preparing for the harvest, he divided his men into three companies then went into the fields to wait. When the people came out of their walled city, his men rose against the people of Shechem and killed them. Abimelech and the men who were with him rushed forward and blocked the entrance to the city, while the other two companies chased those who were in the fields and killed them. At the end of the fight, Abimelech marched into Shechem, killed the people who remained, burned the city, broke down its walls, and spread the ruins with salt. — Judges 9, 42-45

Stories in which one side in a war attempts to not just capture a town or territory, but to make that territory utterly uninhabitable, go back so far that the first are recorded on clay tablets. The Assyrian king Adadnirari I destroyed the city of Taidu and covered it with “kudimmu” which appears to have been some kind of poison. The great conqueror king Tiglath-Pileser I bragged about covering the fields of Hunusa with something called sipu-stones. I’ve no idea what those are, but it appears to have been bad.

The oldest of all these stories may be a record of the proto-Hittite ruler Anitta who, sometime around 1700 BCE, destroyed the city of Hattusa and spread the seeds of tough, hard to eradicate weeds across their fields (Hittite biowarfare. Who knew?). Meanwhile, the most famous incident is certainly when Scipio Aemilianus, at the end of Rome’s last war with Carthage in the middle of the second century BCE, not only burned the city, but had the fields around it plowed with salt to ruin their fertility.


These days, militaries don’t settle for just ruining an area for future habitation. They also want to make it impossible for the enemy to camp there, or even pass through. Which is why much of Ukraine is now plagued by something that seems almost as old as salting the earth — mines.

When people think about mines, their mind usually turns either to big metal globes, covered in bumps, floating just beneath the surface of the sea, or to plate-sized containers of high explosives planted in the ground, where they can be sniffed out by the world’s cutest bomb detector.



When it comes to the fields, mines are definitely affecting Ukrainian farmers. Earlier this week, Euromaidan Press reported on Russia’s “war on farms” that has farmers dealing with damaged or destroyed homes and barns, fields filled with blast craters, bomb fragments, and the all too common unexploded artillery shell. But many of those fields are also spread with mines. Despite Patron and his human handlers, and thousands of other Ukrainians now engaged full time in mine removal, several farmers have already been injured, and some have died, when their farm equipment encountered mines left behind by Russian invaders.

Mines are, and have been for centuries, one of the most effective, and most insidious, weapons of war. so much so that there are an estimated
80 million landmines from past wars still buried in battlefields around the world. Many of these have been there for decades, but that doesn’t mean they’re not still waiting to take the lives of a farmer, or a curious child.

When it comes to why things in Ukraine often seem to be moving slowly, and why much of the original frontline between Ukraine and the areas that Russia occupied in 2014 is still intact, the answer isn’t so much that the two sides are locked in artillery duels that neither can break. It’s that the land between them is so tightly packed with mines — mines planted by both sides, often without anyone noting the position of these mines — that no one and nothing can cross the ground safely. When someone describes a position in Ukraine as “fortified,” they don’t generally mean it has towering stone walls, or reinforced concrete bunkers. They mean that is it absolutely surrounded in a mass of explosives that are more dangerous than all the bullets and shells flying through the air.

Both Ukraine and Russia have used land mines extensively in the Donbas, and around Kharkiv, Chernihiv, Sumy, Zaporizhzhia, and Kyiv. Many of these are devices similar to the Russian TM-62M land mine, which packs high explosives into a plastic case. These are purposely “low metal” mines, meaning that they are very difficult to detect using the usual sensors deployed for finding old mines. They can be scattered on the surface, buried in soil, placed in debris, or rigged as booby traps. There are currently hundreds of thousands of these mines deployed in Ukraine, and removing them from areas no longer thought to be under immediate threat is full time employment for a not-so-small army of Ukrainians.


But these aren’t the only things that make taking a walk across a Ukrainian field, or a stroll down a street, far more deadly than anyone might expect. New forms of mines, some of which were invented in the last year, have been deployed.

Some of these are variants on directional mines, like the sixty year old Claymore. But where the original directional mines were anti-personnel devices triggered by someone walking into a tripwire, some of the new mines of this class are so-called “off route mines” that are capable of firing anti-tank weapons guided by fiber optic or infrared sensors. A good example of these are the German DM-22 mines.

Videos of what might seem to be someone striking from the woods with a man-carried antitank weapon, might easily be a device in this class.



Here’s a video on the DM-22 that shows how it works and how effective it can be.



So, Ukrainian roads and fields are filled with spots where any pressure can generate an explosion strong enough to rupture the belly plate of a tank, and Ukrainian forests are crisscrossed by all-but-invisible lines that can unleash either sprays of anti-personnel shot or an armor-piercing missile. These are exceptionally good reasons to slow any potential advance.

But wait! There’s more! Antipersonnel weapons like the Russian POM-2 mine are still being scattered around by the thousands. Russia is also using these mines to create traps, including by carefully placing them under the bodies of fallen Ukrainian soldiers or civilians, so that when forces come out to retrieve those bodies, the mine explodes. That’s a war crime, by the way. One that Russia has already been guilty of hundreds of times (at least) in this war.

Everything we’ve talked about up until now (except for the war crime booby traps) is a form of “protective minefield.” That’s a minefield laid in an area that’s not currently occupied by the enemy, and which is created with the hopes of keeping them out. Grisly as it is, illegal as many would like them to be, these mines are often regarded as “defensive weapons.” Don’t step into our forest, and you won’t touch any of our highly sensitive fiber optic lines that are going to direct a festival of explosive missiles your way. Okay?

There’s another kind. Those are called “interdiction minefields.” They’re “laid” in areas where the enemy is already present. Laid is in quotes up there because these mines are often deployed either by dropping them from aircraft or by launching them into the area using a multi-launch rocket system. That’s right, an MLRS doesn’t always bring the gift of an immediate explosion. It can also open up like the military’s most twisted version of a piñata, spreading the area with small explosive devices.

Russia has systems for this that can be fired from the BM-21 GRAD, its replacement the Tornado-G, from the BM-27 Uragan, and from the TOS-1 thermobaric launcher. Such mines can also be sent using a ballistic missile and even more varieties that can be dropped from aircraft. No matter how they arrive, these are all examples of the “cluster munitions” responsible for so many civilian casualties in modern wars.

America, it should be noted, also has mines that can be deployed by aircraft or launched by MLRS. But for bonus points, Russia has been known to deploy weapons of this type that are extra colorful, or even shaped like toys, to encourage kids to pick them up. If you guessed “that’s a war crime,” you win again.

Not only does Russia have these systems, they are using them. That’s especially true when it comes to areas that have been taken and retaken many times. Towns and villages like Dolyna and Dibrovne south of Izyum have been practically hosed down with volleys of these things, leaving them a nightmare for forces moving in either direction. Something similar seems to have happened with the town of Pisky, along the front lines in Donetsk oblast. Russia has been fighting to take Pisky for weeks, and reports are that Ukraine pulled out of there days ago. However, Russia doesn’t seem to have moved in. That reluctance appears to be, at least in part, because Pisky is now hosting every member of the mine family, including lots of the MLRS-deployed mines that Russia sent toward the former site of Ukrainian forces. They have Pisky … if they can figure out how to survive taking ownership.

Why are some areas along the front line so incredibly stable? Mines. Why are most advances by either Ukraine or Russia so slow even when it seems like they have an opportunity to break into the enemy backfield and run for the end zone? Mines. Why are some villages not just “in dispute” but essentially unoccupied after they were fought over for weeks? Mines.


They don’t get much talked about. They’re not at all “sexy” when compared to tanks, or drones, or missiles, or long range artillery. But mines are doing a lot to shape the battlefield in Ukraine. Because they are almost always there, and anyone who forgets this for too long, will get a reminder.

Russia is salting the earth in Ukraine, and getting that land back is one helluva a dangerous job.
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Sunday, Sep 4, 2022 · 11:01:19 AM EDT · kos
First official liberation from Kherson offensive:



Ukraine doesn’t make such announcements unless a town is completely safe from Russian counterattacks. This means the front has likely moved significantly south of here.

This village is at the tippy-top northern edge of the Kherson oblast front, and is significant because Russia had heavily fortified it. They intended to hold territory at the oblast’s borders in order to stage their Kherson “referendum.”
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Sunday, Sep 4, 2022 · 11:38:06 AM EDT · kos
Holy shit.


That’s north of Ozerne, see map above. If this is happening, and it’s not at all confirmed in any real way, it could only happen if the area is literally empty of Russians. And I wouldn’t be surprised if Ukraine retreats in the face of any Russian response, since this is not easy-to-support (logistically) for Ukraine.
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Ukraine: Water Infrastructure is the Strategic Prize in Donbas

jjohnjj

We have heard a lot about the North Crimea Canal (NCC) — the one that conducts water from the Dnipro River to the Russian-occupied peninsula — but there are other canals in Ukraine, and one (I believe) that is equal to the NCC in strategic importance......

TTM note: Well worth the read to understand the major water infrastructure at stake in the war.
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
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Fb2BjqvWIAMiqPu
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

Well-Known Member
Feb 6, 2014
109,004
18,691
1


In 2016, Hillary Clinton warned that Donald Trump was a fool who could be baited with a tweet. This past Thursday night, in Philadelphia, Joe Biden upped the ante by asking, in effect: What idiot thing might the former president do if baited with a whole speech? On Saturday night, the world got its answer.

For the 2022 election cycle, smart Republicans had a clear and simple plan: Don’t let the election be about Trump. Make it about gas prices, or crime, or the border, or race, or sex education, or anything—anything but Trump. Trump lost the popular vote in 2016. He lost control of the House in 2018. He lost the presidency in 2020. He lost both Senate seats in Georgia in 2021. Republicans had good reason to dread the havoc he’d create if he joined the fight in 2022.

So they pleaded with Trump to keep out of the 2022 race. A Republican lawmaker in a close contest told CNN on August 19, “I don’t say his name, ever.”

Maybe the pleas were always doomed to fail. Show Trump a spotlight, and he’s going to step into it. But Republicans pinned their hopes on the chance that Trump might muster some self-discipline this one time, some regard for the interests and wishes of his partners and allies.

One of the purposes of Biden’s Philadelphia attack on Trump’s faction within the Republican Party was surely to goad Trump. It worked.

Yesterday, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Trump addressed a rally supposedly in support of Republican candidates in the state: Mehmet Oz for the Senate; the January 6 apologist Doug Mastriano for governor. This was not Trump’s first 2022 rally speech. He spoke in Arizona in July. But this one was different: so extreme, strident, and ugly—and so obviously provoked by Biden’s speech that this was what led local news: “Donald Trump Blasts Philadelphia, President Biden During Rally for Doug Mastriano, Dr. Oz in Wilkes-Barre.”

Yes, you read that right: Campaigning in Pennsylvania, the ex-president denounced the state’s largest city. “I think Philadelphia was a great choice to make this speech of hatred and anger. [Biden’s] speech was hatred and anger,” Trump declared last night. “Last year, the city set an all-time murder record with 560 homicides, and it’s on track to shatter that record again in 2022. Numbers that nobody’s ever seen other than in some other Democrat-run cities.”

Trump spoke at length about the FBI search of his house for stolen government documents. He lashed out at the FBI, attacking the bureau and the Department of Justice as “vicious monsters.” He complained about the FBI searching his closets for stolen government documents, inadvertently reminding everyone that the FBI had actually found stolen government documents in his closet—and in his bathroom too. Trump called Biden an “enemy of the state.” He abused his party’s leader in the U.S. Senate as someone who “should be ashamed.” He claimed to have won the popular vote in the state of Pennsylvania, which, in fact, he lost by more than 80,000 votes.

The rally format allowed time for only brief remarks by the two candidates actually on the ballot, Oz and Mastriano. Its message was otherwise all Trump, Trump, Trump. A Republican vote is a Trump vote. A Republican vote is a vote to endorse lies about the 2020 presidential election.

On and on it went, in a protracted display of narcissistic injury that was exactly the behavior that Biden’s Philadelphia speech had been designed to elicit.

Every day since the FBI search of Mar-a-Lago has brought new proof that Trump still dominates the Republican Party. He has extracted support even from would-be rivals like Florida Governor Ron DeSantis—rituals of submission within a party hierarchy that respects only acts of domination.

Republican congressional leaders desperately but hopelessly tried to avert the risk that this next election would become yet another national referendum on Trump’s leadership. Despite Trump’s lying and boasting, politicians who can count to 50 and 218—the respective numbers needed for a majority in the Senate and House—have to reckon with the real-world costs of Trump’s defeats. But Biden understood their man’s psychology too well.

Biden came to Philadelphia to deliver a wound to Trump’s boundless yet fragile ego. Trump obliged with a monstrously self-involved meltdown 48 hours later. And now his party has nowhere to hide. Trump has overwritten his name on every Republican line of every ballot in 2022.


Biden dangled the bait. Trump took it—and put his whole party on the hook with him. Republican leaders are left with little choice but to pretend to like it.
....
....

Thanks, Trump, for ensuring that the 2022 midterms will be all about you
Dartagnan
 
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