A dubious expediency: How race preferences damage higher education.

TN Lion

Well-Known Member
Sep 6, 2001
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9,406
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Review​

“The unique advantage of this work in the continuing discussion of race-focused policy and practice is that it helpfully focuses on the experience of affirmative action in a compelling manner. Beyond the moral and philosophical objections to affirmative action, the account of the experience itself powerfully justifies concern for the ills still being done in the pursuit of a vain dream.” ―William B. Allen, former chairman, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

“Good intentions all too often produce bad results. Prime example: racial quotas and preferences in higher education. As nine eminent writers explain in A Dubious Expediency, these violations of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 have not only harmed colleges and universities but have hurt most of all the intended beneficiaries.” ―Michael Barone, Washington Examiner

“So much that is written or said about affirmative action is demonstrably false or goes uncontested, allowing the debate about this vital issue to be resolved on the basis of emotions and tired clichés. This anthology will change all that.” ―Ward Connerly, former regent of the University of California

“For half a century, supporters of race preferences have used every trick to force their policies on higher education. They have been sold as ‘diversity’ programs, a ‘revision’ of traditional civil rights theory, and even ‘reparations.’ But as this book compellingly notes, they remain unpopular no matter the label. In 2020, voters in deep-blue California shocked the country by decisively rejecting race preferences. The authors of this book are right: It’s time the rest of the country realized this is an exhausted idea that is causing enormous damage to higher education.” ―John Fund, National Review

About the Author​

Gail Heriot is a professor of law at the University of San Diego and a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. She sits on the board of directors of the American Civil Rights Project, Californians for Equal Rights, the National Association of Scholars, and its state affiliate, the California Association of Scholars. She was co-chair of both the campaign for California’s Proposition 209 in 1996 and the successful campaign to prevent its repeal in 2020. She blogs at Instapundit and the Volokh Conspiracy.

Maimon Schwarzschild is a professor of law at the University of San Diego and an affiliated professor at the University of Haifa. He is a member of the California State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Law & Philosophy. He is an English barrister and has been a visiting professor at the University of Paris/Sorbonne and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.



This book offers eight clear-sighted essays critical of racial “diversity” preferences in American higher education. Unlike more conventional books on the subject, which are essentially apologies for racial reverse discrimination, this volume forthrightly exposes the corrosive effects of identity politics on college and university life.

The fact-filled and hard-hitting chapters are by Heather Mac Donald, Peter N. Kirsanow, Peter W. Wood, Lance Izumi and Rowena Itchon, John Ellis, Carissa Mulder, and the editors Gail Heriot and Maimon Schwarzschild.

YES, the left destroys everything it touches - TN Lion
 
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Osprey Lion

Well-Known Member
Dec 16, 2011
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Osprey, Florida


Review​

“The unique advantage of this work in the continuing discussion of race-focused policy and practice is that it helpfully focuses on the experience of affirmative action in a compelling manner. Beyond the moral and philosophical objections to affirmative action, the account of the experience itself powerfully justifies concern for the ills still being done in the pursuit of a vain dream.” ―William B. Allen, former chairman, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights

“Good intentions all too often produce bad results. Prime example: racial quotas and preferences in higher education. As nine eminent writers explain in A Dubious Expediency, these violations of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 have not only harmed colleges and universities but have hurt most of all the intended beneficiaries.” ―Michael Barone, Washington Examiner

“So much that is written or said about affirmative action is demonstrably false or goes uncontested, allowing the debate about this vital issue to be resolved on the basis of emotions and tired clichés. This anthology will change all that.” ―Ward Connerly, former regent of the University of California

“For half a century, supporters of race preferences have used every trick to force their policies on higher education. They have been sold as ‘diversity’ programs, a ‘revision’ of traditional civil rights theory, and even ‘reparations.’ But as this book compellingly notes, they remain unpopular no matter the label. In 2020, voters in deep-blue California shocked the country by decisively rejecting race preferences. The authors of this book are right: It’s time the rest of the country realized this is an exhausted idea that is causing enormous damage to higher education.” ―John Fund, National Review

About the Author​

Gail Heriot is a professor of law at the University of San Diego and a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. She sits on the board of directors of the American Civil Rights Project, Californians for Equal Rights, the National Association of Scholars, and its state affiliate, the California Association of Scholars. She was co-chair of both the campaign for California’s Proposition 209 in 1996 and the successful campaign to prevent its repeal in 2020. She blogs at Instapundit and the Volokh Conspiracy.

Maimon Schwarzschild is a professor of law at the University of San Diego and an affiliated professor at the University of Haifa. He is a member of the California State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Law & Philosophy. He is an English barrister and has been a visiting professor at the University of Paris/Sorbonne and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.



This book offers eight clear-sighted essays critical of racial “diversity” preferences in American higher education. Unlike more conventional books on the subject, which are essentially apologies for racial reverse discrimination, this volume forthrightly exposes the corrosive effects of identity politics on college and university life.

The fact-filled and hard-hitting chapters are by Heather Mac Donald, Peter N. Kirsanow, Peter W. Wood, Lance Izumi and Rowena Itchon, John Ellis, Carissa Mulder, and the editors Gail Heriot and Maimon Schwarzschild.

YES, the left destroys everything it touches - TN Lion
Whining about race again you redneck loser.