Why wouldn’t you choose to wrestle at PSU

El-Jefe

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2012
25,860
54,189
1
Geography: parents want to see their sons wrestle.
$$$'s: easier-to-get scholarship monies.
Nepotism: already mentioned above.
Friends: knowing others on a schools roster.
Fit: coachability, nature, values, beliefs, wrestling style, character (do they "fit").
Academics: I'd consider Stanford, Northwestern, the Ivy's, etc. too if given the chance.
RTC's: freestyle development, aspirations are better at certain schools.
Also: Relationship with coaches (both parent and wrestler).

D1 coaches attend a lot of camps. Some of these relationships are built very early.
 

dmm53

Well-Known Member
Feb 4, 2017
3,226
5,351
1
Honestly, the religiosity may be a turn off for a kid who is an atheist, Jewish, muslim etc. or maybe is on the fence about the existence of God.
I agree. Young athletes are especially vulnerable to the nonsense of group-think religiosity. So many people want to believe in something (anything really) no matter what it is. There is less than zero evidence for the existence of "god" (whoever or whatever that is). And yet coaches, fans, the media, politicians, and so many others play up this nonsense and criticize anyone who is a skeptic, atheist or non-believer.

I was happy that Nick Lee (whatever his beliefs) didn't invoke some "coach" named "God" or "Jesus" for his win. It was his own hard work and effort, along with good coaching, parenting, genes, circumstances, the draw, and so forth that contributed to his national championship not some non-existent deity.
 

PD4thespawn

Well-Known Member
Dec 27, 2016
689
1,019
1
I agree. Young athletes are especially vulnerable to the nonsense of group-think religiosity. So many people want to believe in something (anything really) no matter what it is. There is less than zero evidence for the existence of "god" (whoever or whatever that is). And yet coaches, fans, the media, politicians, and so many others play up this nonsense and criticize anyone who is a skeptic, atheist or non-believer.

I was happy that Nick Lee (whatever his beliefs) didn't invoke some "coach" named "God" or "Jesus" for his win. It was his own hard work and effort, along with good coaching, parenting, genes, circumstances, the draw, and so forth that contributed to his national championship not some non-existent deity.
Wow, my first ignore. I'll pray for you though.
 

Agoodnap

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2015
3,186
4,485
1
If you guys think we have a bunch of angels you're kidding yourselves. They are college students and like to have fun doing what many college students do during free time.
 

07mantle

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2014
232
302
1
I agree. Young athletes are especially vulnerable to the nonsense of group-think religiosity. So many people want to believe in something (anything really) no matter what it is. There is less than zero evidence for the existence of "god" (whoever or whatever that is). And yet coaches, fans, the media, politicians, and so many others play up this nonsense and criticize anyone who is a skeptic, atheist or non-believer.

I was happy that Nick Lee (whatever his beliefs) didn't invoke some "coach" named "God" or "Jesus" for his win. It was his own hard work and effort, along with good coaching, parenting, genes, circumstances, the draw, and so forth that contributed to his national championship not some non-existent deity.
Well … you are entitled to your opinion…
 
  • Like
Reactions: PD4thespawn

PSUbluTX

Well-Known Member
Feb 7, 2018
1,298
3,365
1
I agree. Young athletes are especially vulnerable to the nonsense of group-think religiosity. So many people want to believe in something (anything really) no matter what it is. There is less than zero evidence for the existence of "god" (whoever or whatever that is). And yet coaches, fans, the media, politicians, and so many others play up this nonsense and criticize anyone who is a skeptic, atheist or non-believer.

I was happy that Nick Lee (whatever his beliefs) didn't invoke some "coach" named "God" or "Jesus" for his win. It was his own hard work and effort, along with good coaching, parenting, genes, circumstances, the draw, and so forth that contributed to his national championship not some non-existent deity.
Sorry to hear you don't understand the meaning of "evidence" in this context and are missing out on an incomparable source of strength and inner peace. But it's never too late. As one who almost missed out on that myself, I want that for you.
 

El-Jefe

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2012
25,860
54,189
1
I agree. Young athletes are especially vulnerable to the nonsense of group-think religiosity. So many people want to believe in something (anything really) no matter what it is. There is less than zero evidence for the existence of "god" (whoever or whatever that is). And yet coaches, fans, the media, politicians, and so many others play up this nonsense and criticize anyone who is a skeptic, atheist or non-believer.

I was happy that Nick Lee (whatever his beliefs) didn't invoke some "coach" named "God" or "Jesus" for his win. It was his own hard work and effort, along with good coaching, parenting, genes, circumstances, the draw, and so forth that contributed to his national championship not some non-existent deity.
LOL. Everybody worships something, regardless of what they call it, whether they admit it or not.

Just yeaterday, a D1 wrestler who did not compete at nationals publicly worshipped himself.
 

Junglekitty

Well-Known Member
Feb 15, 2018
236
488
1
I agree. Young athletes are especially vulnerable to the nonsense of group-think religiosity. So many people want to believe in something (anything really) no matter what it is. There is less than zero evidence for the existence of "god" (whoever or whatever that is). And yet coaches, fans, the media, politicians, and so many others play up this nonsense and criticize anyone who is a skeptic, atheist or non-believer.

I was happy that Nick Lee (whatever his beliefs) didn't invoke some "coach" named "God" or "Jesus" for his win. It was his own hard work and effort, along with good coaching, parenting, genes, circumstances, the draw, and so forth that contributed to his national championship not some non-existent deity.
What's great about this country is you are indeed entitled to your opinion as many have already stated. What I didn't see so far from responders is the approach you took, and I hope no other repliers take that approach. Nobody has said since you are a non-believer, or however you want to categorize it, that it is nonsense. You choose not to believe, that's cool. If the rest of us choose to believe, that should be cool by you and anyone else. Once again, that's what is great about this country, everyone is entitled to their opinion, and have freedoms, such as religion.

I have yet to see anything surrounding the team that indicates they force religion on anyone. I am not saying you have insinuated such, just stating. There are a handful of people that I know that are connected with the team. A few of them I consider "insiders", my word not theirs, and a few of them were on the roster. Out of that handful, there are a select few that I am good personal friends with. We have discussions all the time obviously about the team, kids who were on visits, and whatever else that we can drum up. Not once, has any of those individuals brought up anything about church, bible studies, etc. Again, not saying you insinuated that it is being forced upon them but wanted to state my opinion and hopefully put it to rest before it got to that point.

I know you weren't arguing anything just stating your opinion. So far, nobody else has argued either. If it does get to the point of an argument, that will be utterly ridiculous that in todays day and age, out of everything we have to deal with on a daily basis, people would come on a wrestling forum to argue about religion. Some people have strong faith and that's what gets them through everyday. Others don't. I'm asking everyone who reads this to let this one go, no matter your opinion. This is the best college wrestling team in the country, with the best fan base. The last thing we want to do is let something like this be a major topic of conversation moving forward amongst ourselves, and the kids moving forward.

Thank you
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1AA

82bordeaux

Well-Known Member
Nov 19, 2019
3,878
12,104
1
58
eriespecialty.com
giphy-downsized-large.gif
 

APSPSUwrestlingfan

Well-Known Member
Apr 3, 2021
171
347
1
Definition of faith from Merriam Webster:

Faith: firm belief in something for which there is no proof
The lack of proof extends to atheism. There are so many religions with so many differences that it appears we human beings are searching for greater meaning in our lives. I will not condemn an agnostic who is still wrestling with the question of a higher power.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nitlion6

Split shot

Well-Known Member
Apr 11, 2020
92
190
1
If you guys think we have a bunch of angels you're kidding yourselves. They are college students and like to have fun doing what many college students do during free time.
Do you mean like sitting around an hour or two after winning a National Championship praying with the homeless and giving him money???

Edit: Sorry. I posted prior to reading Jk's post. I am on board with this thought.
 
Last edited:

District four

Well-Known Member
Feb 16, 2018
2,780
2,883
1
What's great about this country is you are indeed entitled to your opinion as many have already stated. What I didn't see so far from responders is the approach you took, and I hope no other repliers take that approach. Nobody has said since you are a non-believer, or however you want to categorize it, that it is nonsense. You choose not to believe, that's cool. If the rest of us choose to believe, that should be cool by you and anyone else. Once again, that's what is great about this country, everyone is entitled to their opinion, and have freedoms, such as religion.

I have yet to see anything surrounding the team that indicates they force religion on anyone. I am not saying you have insinuated such, just stating. There are a handful of people that I know that are connected with the team. A few of them I consider "insiders", my word not theirs, and a few of them were on the roster. Out of that handful, there are a select few that I am good personal friends with. We have discussions all the time obviously about the team, kids who were on visits, and whatever else that we can drum up. Not once, has any of those individuals brought up anything about church, bible studies, etc. Again, not saying you insinuated that it is being forced upon them but wanted to state my opinion and hopefully put it to rest before it got to that point.

I know you weren't arguing anything just stating your opinion. So far, nobody else has argued either. If it does get to the point of an argument, that will be utterly ridiculous that in todays day and age, out of everything we have to deal with on a daily basis, people would come on a wrestling forum to argue about religion. Some people have strong faith and that's what gets them through everyday. Others don't. I'm asking everyone who reads this to let this one go, no matter your opinion. This is the best college wrestling team in the country, with the best fan base. The last thing we want to do is let something like this be a major topic of conversation moving forward amongst ourselves, and the kids moving forward.

Thank you
He didn't state an opinion he made an assertion that believing in a deity was not logical. I agree with you if he does have an opinion that's one thing but putting people down for their beliefs is just stupid and un American
 

TangSoo

Well-Known Member
Oct 30, 2015
2,055
4,044
1
I agree. Young athletes are especially vulnerable to the nonsense of group-think religiosity. So many people want to believe in something (anything really) no matter what it is. There is less than zero evidence for the existence of "god" (whoever or whatever that is). And yet coaches, fans, the media, politicians, and so many others play up this nonsense and criticize anyone who is a skeptic, atheist or non-believer.

I was happy that Nick Lee (whatever his beliefs) didn't invoke some "coach" named "God" or "Jesus" for his win. It was his own hard work and effort, along with good coaching, parenting, genes, circumstances, the draw, and so forth that contributed to his national championship not some non-existent deity.
I honestly don't EVER see people of faith initiating criticism of athleists. Only dipshits such as yourself initiating hostilities from the other side. In a wrestling thread nonetheless. Sounds like you have zero respect at all for at least half of the team you follow. But then, you always seem to interject your beliefs into a wrestling thread, whether it's politics or religion. Seems like a personal weakness.
 

Agoodnap

Well-Known Member
Sep 27, 2015
3,186
4,485
1
Does anyone know when the next "wrestlers drink for free" night at the Lions Denis being held? Some of you guys ought to drop down and have a drink.
 

LongJakk

Well-Known Member
Sep 19, 2001
1,321
847
1
I wish that dmm53 didn't quote me the way he did. I was only answering the question posed in this thread. It may not be every recruits cup of tea. I was raised in the church. My moms grandfather was a pastor. My estranged wife's brother, father, uncle and both grandfathers are or were pastors.
 

johnstownsteel

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2013
6,318
13,838
1
Johnstown Pa
I wish that dmm53 didn't quote me the way he did. I was only answering the question posed in this thread. It may not be every recruits cup of tea. I was raised in the church. My moms grandfather was a pastor. My estranged wife's brother, father, uncle and both grandfathers are or were pastors.
And I’m sure you are 100 percent correct in that it may not be every recruits cup of tea. Having said that, if those boys are true Christians, it doesn’t matter to them that some recruits may reject what they are saying. Pleasing “the world” is not their objective…Pleasing God is. They are instructed to share his word, share their testimonials and lead others to Christ. We are told that we will be laughed at for doing that, may some day be persecuted for it and may not even be accepted by others including our own family because of our faith. They know that and to me it makes them very brave young men that are not just living for themselves.
 

horraybeer

Well-Known Member
Dec 6, 2013
374
397
1
I honestly don't EVER see people of faith initiating criticism of athleists. Only dipshits such as yourself initiating hostilities from the other side. In a wrestling thread nonetheless. Sounds like you have zero respect at all for at least half of the team you follow. But then, you always seem to interject your beliefs into a wrestling thread, whether it's politics or religion. Seems like a personal weakness.
"I honestly don't EVER see people of faith initiating criticism of athleists" Is it april fools day? Or are you from another planet?
 

slushhead

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2014
3,053
7,233
1
I wish that dmm53 didn't quote me the way he did. I was only answering the question posed in this thread. It may not be every recruits cup of tea. I was raised in the church. My moms grandfather was a pastor. My estranged wife's brother, father, uncle and both grandfathers are or were pastors.
You don’t need to defend your post. The angle I believe you intended to make is just one of many flavors of “fit”.

Prevailing or predominant personalities, belief systems, approaches to the “game”, etc. all contribute to the general culture of a program, and each individual looking at a program is bound to feel like he is a better “fit” with some vs. others. Nothing wrong with that. Comfort in a program can be important to an athlete, and the subject you raised can relate to comfort in a valid way. You didn’t try to force anything on anyone.
 

mcpat

Well-Known Member
Mar 13, 2021
1,924
4,077
1
I wish that dmm53 didn't quote me the way he did. I was only answering the question posed in this thread. It may not be every recruits cup of tea.
We all read it consistent with your explanation. I wouldn’t worry about it at all.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Creek Side

PSUNAV

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2014
86
115
1
Every Tuesday in the local Richmond (VA) paper they have a “scholar-athletes of the month feature.

Today featured sophomore Eli Cramer from Cosby High School, 113 lb state champ. He won at 106 last year. “Penn State listed as his dream school. May apply to service academies. Don’t know that PSU will have interest but shows how the last 11 years have impacted young kids!
 

johnstownsteel

Well-Known Member
Aug 2, 2013
6,318
13,838
1
Johnstown Pa
Every Tuesday in the local Richmond (VA) paper they have a “scholar-athletes of the month feature.

Today featured sophomore Eli Cramer from Cosby High School, 113 lb state champ. He won at 106 last year. “Penn State listed as his dream school. May apply to service academies. Don’t know that PSU will have interest but shows how the last 11 years have impacted young kids!
My cousins boy wrestled in that area. Went to Lee Davis HS. He won a couple state championships in wrestling when he was younger but baseball is his thing. He was on that Mechanicsville little league team that went on a run to LLWS. I’m actually watching his college team play right now on espn+. He’s at VMI.
 

a_mshaffer

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2014
2,936
1,945
1
My cousins boy wrestled in that area. Went to Lee Davis HS. He won a couple state championships in wrestling when he was younger but baseball is his thing. He was on that Mechanicsville little league team that went on a run to LLWS. I’m actually watching his college team play right now on espn+. He’s at VMI.
what his name?.... I helped out at DeepRun and ran the youth club in a league that some of the mechanicsville kids wrestled in awhile back. Regardless, Cosby is class 5 I believe... we'll see where he goes in the pre-season tourneys. I know the kid from DeepRun, Jerry Simon, who won states at 120 is supposed to jump into the big tourneys next year.