What book(s) are you currently reading?

Discussion in 'BWI / McAndrew Board' started by john4psu, Feb 8, 2018.

  1. BigWesley

    BigWesley Active Member
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    East of Eden by Steinbeck. I picked it up because my favorite band, Mumford and Sons, makes references to the book in one of their songs. It is a really well written book with many details and descriptions that make it more realistic
     
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  2. Tom McAndrew

    Tom McAndrew Well-Known Member
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    I finished the below book about a week ago. It was published in 2006, and it's been on my shelves for nearly that long. I had picked it up 100s of times, but I always seemed to opt for another book, in part because I already knew so much about the battles in and around Philadelphia. I'm scheduled to go to a presentation by the author later this year, so I decided to finally open this book and read it. For me, it was an excellent book; one I had trouble putting down. Its main focus is on the Battle of Brandywine, though it spends time on the events leading up to that battle (starting from Gen. Howe trying to tempt Gen. Washington into coming out from the hills/mountains of Northern NJ to fight the British in the Spring of 1777, to Gen. Howe and many of his troops setting sail from New York City to a destination unknown to the patriots, from the landing of the British at Head of Elk, MD, through skirmishes in MD and DE, and the two armies evading traps set for the other). While the Battle of Brandywine has been covered more fully in a couple of other books that I've read, this book does a great job of weaving together strict battle facts with thoughts, opinions, etc. written by many of the battle participants, local townspeople, etc. It continues examining the campaign through the Battle of the Clouds, the Paoli Massacre (which the author had previously written about, in Battle of Paoli -- the best book available on the subject), and the feinting that the two forces did as Washington sought to protect Philadelphia, and Howe sought to cross the Schuylkill River so that he could take Philadelphia. (Hard to imagine that in 1777, Philadelphia was the largest city in the United States, and the only way to cross from what is now Center City to what is now West Philadelphia was over one of 3 ferries, or to cross upriver over fords in what is now Montgomery County or Chester County.) The book ends a day before the British enter Philadelphia -- that part of the Philadelphia Campaign through Valley Forge are part of the author's accompanying book, which I'm currently reading: The Philadelphia Campaign: Volume II: Germantown and the Roads to Valley Forge. If you have interest in the battles in and around Philadelphia, I highly recommend this book.



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  3. sluggo72

    sluggo72 Well-Known Member
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    Just finished this one...
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    unfortunately I know many of the players.
     
  4. nittanyfan333

    nittanyfan333 Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]




    the struggle is real.....
     
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  5. olelion

    olelion Well-Known Member
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    The Second World Wars -Victor Davis Hanson
    A slighly different look at the war disecting air war, water, land, people. A pretty deep read but perfect for WWII history buffs

    Striking Gridiron - Greg Nichols
    The Braddock high school football streak 6 years unbeaten, one tie, 6 straight WPIAL championships. Told against the backdrop of the 1959 steel strike. A really great read for me being from the area
     
  6. Hugh Laurie

    Hugh Laurie Well-Known Member
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    Secret Empires by Peter Schweitzer.
     
  7. delcoLion

    delcoLion Well-Known Member
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    I’m in the same boat, Tom, I certainly don’t have your command of the Rev War but that occupies most of my reading. I’m currently reading a bio of James Madison. I find the founders to be very interesting. A book that I read last year about the Constitutional convention asks the reader to not put the Founders on a pedestal but at least a dozen of them could be considered among the greatest political scientists in history.
     
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  8. LafayetteBear

    LafayetteBear Well-Known Member
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    "The charms of Mrs. Loring?" FLAG. (They had painters back then, didn't they?)

    "Etc?" More Mrs. Loring stuff, perhaps?
     
  9. Tom McAndrew

    Tom McAndrew Well-Known Member
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    The refs do not take kindly when fans tell them they should throw a flag on themselves. ;)

    I'm pretty sure that no paintings of Mrs. Elizabeth Loring exist.

    There is a lot of debate amongst Rev War scholars as to whether or not Gen. Howe and Mrs. Loring had a sexual relationship. As best as I can tell (and I have researched it a good bit), there is nothing definitive that proves that they did. It is somewhat suspicious that while Joshua Loring, Jr. (her husband) stayed in NYC in 1777 and 1778, Mrs. Loring accompanied Gen. Howe on the ships that sailed from NYC, and landed at Head of Elk, MD, in 1777, and stayed in Philadelphia from Sep. 1777 through June 1778, while Gen. Howe was there.

    There is a lot of speculation, assumptions, an infamous line in a poem, mention of it in a few letters sent back home from British soldiers stationed in Philadelphia, and a few other mentions, but nothing conclusive.

    The Lorings went with the British when they evacuated Boston in 1776, and sailed to Halifax. They returned to the US when the Halifax forces landed in NYC in 1776. Joshua Loring, Jr. was appointed Commissary General of Prisoners (patriots held prisoner in NYC), where he was hated by the prisoners. (It's difficult to prove, but it appears that he did everything he could to rip off supplies for the prisoners, and enriched his pockets.) Mrs. Loring and her children sailed to England a year or two after the British abandoned Philadelphia in 1778. (I could look up the exact date, but it's not all that important in the narrative.) Mr. Loring stayed in NYC until after the Treaty of Paris was signed, and the British troops and loyalists that elected to leave the US sailed to England in 1783. At that time, he was reunited with Mrs. Loring, and they had three additional children. Mr. Loring died in 1789, at the age of 45. Mrs. Loring was granted a pension by the English government. She lived until 1835. She did not remarry, and there is no evidence that she met up with Gen. Howe while the two of them were in England after he was relieved of his post in 1778. The only link between the two of them in England is a letter from Gen. Howe submitted to support her pension application.
     
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  10. SUPERTODD

    SUPERTODD Well-Known Member
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    Read Carnage and Culture by Hanson if you have not already. Very well done.

    If you like World War II, John Keegan’s books are great. He also wrote histories of the Civil War and WW I. He does the conflicts justice, but also analyzes industrial and economic might as it relates to war.
     
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  11. kijanacat

    kijanacat Well-Known Member
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    I attended a lecture in Wasington, DC. Several speakers addressed certain issues regarding the cooperation of US and UK. Consensus was they did not share all of their secret findings. Pearl Harbor was among intel the Brits kept to themselves. TIFWIW.
     
  12. ram511

    ram511 Active Member
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    Untold History of the United States
     
  13. Burb

    Burb Well-Known Member
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    Crosseres
     
  14. Mr. Potter

    Mr. Potter Well-Known Member
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    Thank you America. Can't think of the author's name but he was the first physician in Cherry Hill, NJ. Great read of your into the Presidents of the United States.
     
  15. Ranger Dan

    Ranger Dan Well-Known Member
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    Beginners Guide to Brazilian Jiu Jitsu
     
  16. Tom McAndrew

    Tom McAndrew Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]

    I completed this book about 3 weeks ago. It was excellent on its own, but is best read in conjunction with Vol. 1, which I posted about earlier in this thread. McGuire fills in a lot of details about the period between when the British marched into Philadelphia in Sep. 1777, and Washington and his troops set up winter camp at Valley Forge in Dec. 1777. I highly recommend the book to those that have an interest in the subject, or those that would like to learn a lot more about the Philadelphia campaign in the Revolutionary War.
     
  17. wentzel25

    wentzel25 Well-Known Member
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    The Most Beautiful Woman in Town and other stories - Charles Bukowski
     
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  18. martypsu

    martypsu Well-Known Member
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    I agree--they may have written themselves out
     
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  19. Tom McAndrew

    Tom McAndrew Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]

    I'm scheduled to go to a presentation on Daniel Morgan later this month. While I know a great deal about him, I wanted to take a closer look at him before the presentation. Unfortunately, there aren't a lot of recent books written about Daniel Morgan. Don Higginbotham wrote an excellent book about him, but the hardback version is out of print. There was another book about him that was independently published in 2015, but that didn't have the best of reviews. So I turned to North Callahan's biography from 1961. Callahan's book was pretty good, in that it gave most of the major details of his life. However, the writing style was somewhat dated (imagine that), and at times Callahan seems more like a cheerleader than a biographer. This isn't a bad book if you want some insight into the life of one of the more interesting generals in the Rev War.
     
  20. BBrown

    BBrown Well-Known Member
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    Or at the very least slow down and come up with better stories. They are becoming James Patterson and that is not a good thing.
     
  21. mdking001

    mdking001 Well-Known Member
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    The City of Ember by J Duprau

    Only because my daughter is reading it for 7th grade school and based upon what they are asking her to do, I told her I would read it as well.



    Prior to that I had just finished Earth Unaware by Orson Scott Card. It has an interesting concept and it kept me involved throughout but it was no Enders Game, Abyss or others. I hated how it ended because now I must read the next one. Yes it hooked me enough for that :)
     
  22. Mr. Potter

    Mr. Potter Well-Known Member
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    "Thank you America" A history of the United States told thru the biographies of our Past Presidents of the United States. Written by Harold Kirsch who was of the first Doctors in the Cherry hill, NJ area and recently passed (within the last two months)
     
  23. Hugh Laurie

    Hugh Laurie Well-Known Member
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    Evil Empires by Peter Schweitzer

    Book will blow your mind on how elected politicians help their families and friends build billion dollar empires.
     
  24. BBrown

    BBrown Well-Known Member
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    Wow thats timely. LOL.
     
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  25. LionJim

    LionJim Well-Known Member
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    In honor of Feynman's upcoming centenary (May 11), I've decided to read this for, I believe, the fourth time.

    [​IMG]
     
  26. Locolion

    Locolion Well-Known Member
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    Settle down Beavis
     
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  27. Lionguy32

    Lionguy32 Well-Known Member
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    I am now reading this....

    [​IMG]

    If anyone likes spy novels, I highly recommend Daniel Silva.
     
  28. Woodpecker

    Woodpecker Well-Known Member
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    Probably not an accurate depiction:
    [​IMG]
     
  29. GreggK

    GreggK Well-Known Member
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    Good Man. I fear he didn't go far enough.
     
  30. LionJim

    LionJim Well-Known Member
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    This looks like X-Men art, Cockrum and Byrne.
     
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  31. EPC FAN

    EPC FAN Well-Known Member
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    Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin. I've read it already, but it is a refresher course.
     
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  32. fairgambit

    fairgambit Well-Known Member
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    Terrific book. I read it just a few years after it was 1st published in the early 60's. I had almost no personal contact with blacks in those days. There were less than a dozen in my high school and none in my neighborhood. Although I lived in white society, I cannot recall a single time when my parents, or any of their friends, uttered a racist word. The book opened my eyes to a world I knew nothing about.
    I will add I am just starting Thomas More: A Biography by Richard Marius
     
    152 fairgambit, Apr 24, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2018
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  33. supermatt24

    supermatt24 Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]

    So good.
     
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  34. Thorndike2012

    Thorndike2012 Well-Known Member
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    "The Dying Fish", by Cedric Keith.

    https://thedyingfish.com/tag/cedric-keith/

    Fly fishermen are the poets of anglers, and Keith proves that point once again. Lovely prose on a topic dear to my heart. Highly recommended for hikers, fly fishermen and other adventurers.
     
  35. Ten Thousan Marbles

    Ten Thousan Marbles Well-Known Member
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    I really enjoyed the book.

    Each chapter had a map (or maps) showing the progress of the campaign.

    I have moved on to:
     
  36. Nittany Ned2

    Nittany Ned2 Well-Known Member
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    I recently bought Grant’s memoirs specifically to read his comments on the Overland Campaign. What a meat grinder.
     
    156 Nittany Ned2, Apr 25, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
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  37. john4psu

    john4psu Well-Known Member
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  38. ApexLion

    ApexLion Well-Known Member
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    Adrian McKinty series. It’s 3 trilogies. Detective Sean Duffy solves crimes, sometimes violently in N. Ireland. His commentary on societal issues is hilarious at times. Clever stuff.
     
    158 ApexLion, Apr 25, 2018
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
  39. We Are . . .

    We Are . . . Well-Known Member
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  40. Tom McAndrew

    Tom McAndrew Well-Known Member
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    I completed the book pictured below, Dunmore's War: The Last Conflict of America's Colonial Era, last week, and would highly recommend it. There are a lot of claims, misinformation, etc. that surround Dunmore's War, which took place in 1774. Its roots were somewhat complicated. The Iroquois, at the Treaty of Fort Stanwix (1768) had ceded the land south of the Ohio River to the British. This was, at the time, the hunting ground of the Shawnee, the Western Delaware (Lenni Lenape), and the Mingo (who were Senecas that the Iroquois had sent to the area to influence/maintain control over the other tribes). There was also the conflicting claims to the region between the Monongahela and the Ohio Rivers, from both Pennsylvania and Virginia. Virginia felt this was part of their Augusta County, while Pennsylvania considered this part of their Westmoreland County. The boundaries of the royal colony charter for VA, and the proprietary charter given William Penn for PA, were not clearly defined, so this was not something that could be easily resolved. The Royal Proclamation of 1763 (at the end of the Seven Years' War) reserved the land between the Appalachian Mountains and the Ohio River as the hunting grounds of the Shawnee and other nations that had sided with the British in the Seven Years' War. The Proclamation put a halt to all purchases of Indian land by private interests. At the same time, many militia men from the Seven Years' War had been promised/granted tracts of land in this region by Virginia, so these individuals wanted to survey their lands/move there. And lastly, there was John Murray, fourth Earl of Dunmore, who was appointed royal governor of New York in 1770, and royal governor of Virginia, who saw his appointment as a means to improve his wealth.

    The author, Glenn F. Williams, does a great job of detailing what took place during this conflict. Some may feel that he provides too much detail, but that's his style in history books, and it does enable the reader to fully understand the dynamics of the situation, and what took place.

    It's fascinating to read about how VA and PA were trying to prove how the disputed land was theirs. VA sent forces into the area, rebuilt/reinforced Fort Pitt (which was renamed Fort Dunmore during this period).

    The Battle of Point Pleasant effectively ended the war. The Shawnee leader, Cornstalk, had planned a sneak attack on the left wing of the VA forces. The morning of the Shawnee's planned attack, the VA forces sent out two small hunting parties to supplement their food supplies. These parties encountered the Shawnee that were advancing upon the VA militia's camp, unbeknown to the VA forces. The Shawnee were deprived of the element of surprise, and while they initially were winning the battle, they suffered great losses during the battle. A few days later, Cornstalk and Shawnee leaders met with Lord Dunmore at Camp Charlotte, and agreed to a treaty which established that the Indians would stay north of the Ohio, and that they would not contest the lands south of the Ohio.

    Yinzers, and those in West Virginia, as well as those interested in this era of history, should find this book interesting.


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