Unsafe At Any Speed? Electric Cars Keep Catching Fire

m.knox

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Aug 20, 2003
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Oh my............

https://issuesinsights.com/2022/06/02/unsafe-at-any-speed-electric-cars-keep-catching-fire/

In Vancouver, Canada, in late May, a Tesla Model Y burst into flames while the driver was waiting for a light at an intersection. He had to kick out a window to escape.

Around the same time, a new Tesla burst into flames in Brooklyn, Illinois, and a week before that a Model 3 caught fire in California City, California, while it was parked in a driveway.

In April, a deadly lithium-ion battery fire occurred in a Tesla car crash in Houston.

Last year, a Tesla caught fire while charging overnight in a garage, which the Washington Post described as “one in a string of recent examples showing what can happen when electric cars are left parked in garages to charge overnight” and which promoted electric vehicle (EV) makers to warn “owners not to leave the cars charging unattended in certain circumstances, or sitting fully charged in garages.” (This site keeps tabs on Tesla fires.)

Tesla recently ordered a recall of almost 130,000 cars because of an “infotainment” system issue that threatened to overheat during “fast charging.”

We’re not trying to single Tesla out here. It isn’t the only one having problems with its lithium-ion batteries.

A March 31 house fire in Damascus, Maryland, caused by a charging Chevy Volt resulted in $350,000 worth of damages.

Last August, GM recalled all the 110,000 Chevrolet Bolt cars it had sold “due to the risk of the high-voltage battery pack catching fire” and warned owners to park their cars away from buildings and other cars. As of April, GM had replaced the batteries on only about a quarter of the recalled cars.

Chevrolet recalled about 110,000 of its Volt EV model years 2017 to 2022 for potential battery fire issues.

In France last month, two electric buses spontaneously exploded, resulting in all 149 electric buses being pulled from service.
 

bourbon n blues

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Nov 20, 2019
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Oh my............

https://issuesinsights.com/2022/06/02/unsafe-at-any-speed-electric-cars-keep-catching-fire/

In Vancouver, Canada, in late May, a Tesla Model Y burst into flames while the driver was waiting for a light at an intersection. He had to kick out a window to escape.

Around the same time, a new Tesla burst into flames in Brooklyn, Illinois, and a week before that a Model 3 caught fire in California City, California, while it was parked in a driveway.

In April, a deadly lithium-ion battery fire occurred in a Tesla car crash in Houston.

Last year, a Tesla caught fire while charging overnight in a garage, which the Washington Post described as “one in a string of recent examples showing what can happen when electric cars are left parked in garages to charge overnight” and which promoted electric vehicle (EV) makers to warn “owners not to leave the cars charging unattended in certain circumstances, or sitting fully charged in garages.” (This site keeps tabs on Tesla fires.)

Tesla recently ordered a recall of almost 130,000 cars because of an “infotainment” system issue that threatened to overheat during “fast charging.”

We’re not trying to single Tesla out here. It isn’t the only one having problems with its lithium-ion batteries.

A March 31 house fire in Damascus, Maryland, caused by a charging Chevy Volt resulted in $350,000 worth of damages.

Last August, GM recalled all the 110,000 Chevrolet Bolt cars it had sold “due to the risk of the high-voltage battery pack catching fire” and warned owners to park their cars away from buildings and other cars. As of April, GM had replaced the batteries on only about a quarter of the recalled cars.

Chevrolet recalled about 110,000 of its Volt EV model years 2017 to 2022 for potential battery fire issues.


In France last month, two electric buses spontaneously exploded, resulting in all 149 electric buses being pulled from service.
Retards.
 
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rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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Oh my............

https://issuesinsights.com/2022/06/02/unsafe-at-any-speed-electric-cars-keep-catching-fire/

In Vancouver, Canada, in late May, a Tesla Model Y burst into flames while the driver was waiting for a light at an intersection. He had to kick out a window to escape.

Around the same time, a new Tesla burst into flames in Brooklyn, Illinois, and a week before that a Model 3 caught fire in California City, California, while it was parked in a driveway.

In April, a deadly lithium-ion battery fire occurred in a Tesla car crash in Houston.

Last year, a Tesla caught fire while charging overnight in a garage, which the Washington Post described as “one in a string of recent examples showing what can happen when electric cars are left parked in garages to charge overnight” and which promoted electric vehicle (EV) makers to warn “owners not to leave the cars charging unattended in certain circumstances, or sitting fully charged in garages.” (This site keeps tabs on Tesla fires.)

Tesla recently ordered a recall of almost 130,000 cars because of an “infotainment” system issue that threatened to overheat during “fast charging.”

We’re not trying to single Tesla out here. It isn’t the only one having problems with its lithium-ion batteries.

A March 31 house fire in Damascus, Maryland, caused by a charging Chevy Volt resulted in $350,000 worth of damages.

Last August, GM recalled all the 110,000 Chevrolet Bolt cars it had sold “due to the risk of the high-voltage battery pack catching fire” and warned owners to park their cars away from buildings and other cars. As of April, GM had replaced the batteries on only about a quarter of the recalled cars.

Chevrolet recalled about 110,000 of its Volt EV model years 2017 to 2022 for potential battery fire issues.


In France last month, two electric buses spontaneously exploded, resulting in all 149 electric buses being pulled from service.

Oh my, short Tesla now!

This is not the first time it’s been said that EVs are not as likely to catch fire as vehicles that have an internal combustion engine. Now it has been confirmed with data from the National Transport Safety Board, compiled by AutoinsuranceEZ, which says that hybrid vehicles have the highest fire risk.​
Fully electric vehicles, on the other hand, were deemed far safer than both hybirds and gas cars; they are far less likely to catch fire, with just 25.1 fires per 100,000 sales. That’s compared to 3,474 hybrid fires and 1,529 ICE fires per 100,000 sales respectively.​
When looking at the number of vehicles recalled in 2020 due to fire risk, AutoinsuranceEZ found that ICE topped the table. The only two notable EV recalls were for the Hyundai Kona (82,000 units recalled due to faulty battery packs that could cause a fire) and the highly publicised Chevrolet Bolt EV recall (70,000 units recalled).​
 
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psuted

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Oh my............

https://issuesinsights.com/2022/06/02/unsafe-at-any-speed-electric-cars-keep-catching-fire/

In Vancouver, Canada, in late May, a Tesla Model Y burst into flames while the driver was waiting for a light at an intersection. He had to kick out a window to escape.

Around the same time, a new Tesla burst into flames in Brooklyn, Illinois, and a week before that a Model 3 caught fire in California City, California, while it was parked in a driveway.

In April, a deadly lithium-ion battery fire occurred in a Tesla car crash in Houston.

Last year, a Tesla caught fire while charging overnight in a garage, which the Washington Post described as “one in a string of recent examples showing what can happen when electric cars are left parked in garages to charge overnight” and which promoted electric vehicle (EV) makers to warn “owners not to leave the cars charging unattended in certain circumstances, or sitting fully charged in garages.” (This site keeps tabs on Tesla fires.)

Tesla recently ordered a recall of almost 130,000 cars because of an “infotainment” system issue that threatened to overheat during “fast charging.”

We’re not trying to single Tesla out here. It isn’t the only one having problems with its lithium-ion batteries.

A March 31 house fire in Damascus, Maryland, caused by a charging Chevy Volt resulted in $350,000 worth of damages.

Last August, GM recalled all the 110,000 Chevrolet Bolt cars it had sold “due to the risk of the high-voltage battery pack catching fire” and warned owners to park their cars away from buildings and other cars. As of April, GM had replaced the batteries on only about a quarter of the recalled cars.

Chevrolet recalled about 110,000 of its Volt EV model years 2017 to 2022 for potential battery fire issues.


In France last month, two electric buses spontaneously exploded, resulting in all 149 electric buses being pulled from service.

Ban electric cars.
 
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1Hammers1

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Think about kicking the glass out of your car and climbing out the window. Most people can't do that. Also wasn't the new cyber truck supposed to have some kind of glass that wouldn't break ?
 

rumble_lion

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Think about kicking the glass out of your car and climbing out the window. Most people can't do that. Also wasn't the new cyber truck supposed to have some kind of glass that wouldn't break ?

Yeah, you don't need to do that. There is a manual release lever in the door.
 
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The Spin Meister

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Nov 27, 2012
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An altered state
Oh my, short Tesla now!

This is not the first time it’s been said that EVs are not as likely to catch fire as vehicles that have an internal combustion engine. Now it has been confirmed with data from the National Transport Safety Board, compiled by AutoinsuranceEZ, which says that hybrid vehicles have the highest fire risk.​
Fully electric vehicles, on the other hand, were deemed far safer than both hybirds and gas cars; they are far less likely to catch fire, with just 25.1 fires per 100,000 sales. That’s compared to 3,474 hybrid fires and 1,529 ICE fires per 100,000 sales respectively.​
When looking at the number of vehicles recalled in 2020 due to fire risk, AutoinsuranceEZ found that ICE topped the table. The only two notable EV recalls were for the Hyundai Kona (82,000 units recalled due to faulty battery packs that could cause a fire) and the highly publicised Chevrolet Bolt EV recall (70,000 units recalled).​
Putting out ICE fire is relatively simple compared to EV fires. EV fires are also much hotter, release more toxic fumes, burn much longer, and cause far more damage to vehicle and any surrounding structure. And fire departments do have the equipment or training to deal with them.
 

1Hammers1

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Jan 26, 2014
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How is it even legal to sell a car that won't alow you to manually open the door ? So if your tesla looses power you can't pull a handle and open the door ?
 

Ski

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Think about kicking the glass out of your car and climbing out the window. Most people can't do that. Also wasn't the new cyber truck supposed to have some kind of glass that wouldn't break ?

A curved windshield is much easier to break from the inside out than the outside in. I have broken one with a single punch with no where near the same power as two legs. Don't ask......
 
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jjw165

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A curved windshield is much easier to break from the inside out than the outside in. I have broken one with a single punch with no where near the same power as two legs. Don't ask......
I won’t lol
 

rumble_lion

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Putting out ICE fire is relatively simple compared to EV fires. EV fires are also much hotter, release more toxic fumes, burn much longer, and cause far more damage to vehicle and any surrounding structure. And fire departments do have the equipment or training to deal with them.

That's because they have been putting out thousands of ICE fires every year for many decades. They have had a lot of practice.
 

rumble_lion

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Putting out ICE fire is relatively simple compared to EV fires. EV fires are also much hotter, release more toxic fumes, burn much longer, and cause far more damage to vehicle and any surrounding structure. And fire departments do have the equipment or training to deal with them.

Putting out ICE fire is relatively simple compared to EV fires.

Doesn't mean much to all the people that die in ICE fires every year.

US fire departments responded to an estimated 212,500 vehicle fires in the United States during 2018. These fires caused an estimated 560 civilian deaths; 1,500 civilian injuries; and $1.9 billion in direct property damage.​
 

psuted

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Sounds like Tesla's are very DANGEROUS....

US has over 750 complaints of Teslas braking for no reason​


https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory/us-750-complaints-teslas-brake-reason-85158957

Wow, these electric vehicles seem to have a mind of their own. Seems to be inherent trait of electric vehicles.

Violent and spontaneous fires, no way to get out quickly when your trapped, and unwanted deceleration while driving? If they suddenly and unexpectedly decelerate on their own, I wonder if they also suddenly accelerate while driving as well.

Indeed, Electric vehicles seem very dangerous. Perhaps we need a moratorium on the production and use of electric vehicles until we have a thorough Congressional investigation and review of safety issues and disproportionate number of deaths.
 
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m.knox

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Wow, these electric vehicles seem to have a mind of their own. Seems to be inherent trait of electric vehicles.

Violent and spontaneous fires, no way to get out quickly when your trapped, and unwanted deceleration while driving? If they suddenly and unexpectedly decelerate on their own, I wonder if they also suddenly accelerate while driving as well.

Indeed, Electric vehicles seem very dangerous. Perhaps we need a moratorium on the production and use of electric vehicles until we have a thorough Congressional investigation and review of safety issues and disproportionate number of deaths.

And imagine all the e-waste at the end of life............
 
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m.knox

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Not only dangerous but the increased pollution we will have to deal with. But @rumble_lion thinks there are no problems and electric vehicles are great.

I like rumble, don't get me wrong, but the thought there we will SAVE THE WORLD by driving Tesla's is absurd. The only way to SAVE THE WORLD is to eat the babies. Humans consume resources. Period.
 
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Rip_E_2_Joe_PA

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Jun 9, 2002
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Oh my............

https://issuesinsights.com/2022/06/02/unsafe-at-any-speed-electric-cars-keep-catching-fire/

In Vancouver, Canada, in late May, a Tesla Model Y burst into flames while the driver was waiting for a light at an intersection. He had to kick out a window to escape.

Around the same time, a new Tesla burst into flames in Brooklyn, Illinois, and a week before that a Model 3 caught fire in California City, California, while it was parked in a driveway.

In April, a deadly lithium-ion battery fire occurred in a Tesla car crash in Houston.

Last year, a Tesla caught fire while charging overnight in a garage, which the Washington Post described as “one in a string of recent examples showing what can happen when electric cars are left parked in garages to charge overnight” and which promoted electric vehicle (EV) makers to warn “owners not to leave the cars charging unattended in certain circumstances, or sitting fully charged in garages.” (This site keeps tabs on Tesla fires.)

Tesla recently ordered a recall of almost 130,000 cars because of an “infotainment” system issue that threatened to overheat during “fast charging.”

We’re not trying to single Tesla out here. It isn’t the only one having problems with its lithium-ion batteries.

A March 31 house fire in Damascus, Maryland, caused by a charging Chevy Volt resulted in $350,000 worth of damages.

Last August, GM recalled all the 110,000 Chevrolet Bolt cars it had sold “due to the risk of the high-voltage battery pack catching fire” and warned owners to park their cars away from buildings and other cars. As of April, GM had replaced the batteries on only about a quarter of the recalled cars.

Chevrolet recalled about 110,000 of its Volt EV model years 2017 to 2022 for potential battery fire issues.


In France last month, two electric buses spontaneously exploded, resulting in all 149 electric buses being pulled from service.Laziness is the cause of posts like this....
 

junior1

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May 29, 2001
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I like rumble, don't get me wrong, but the thought there we will SAVE THE WORLD by driving Tesla's is absurd. The only way to SAVE THE WORLD is to eat the babies. Humans consume resources. Period.
That might catch on if we could get "babies" included as an ingredient on one of tv's cooking challenges. Progressives would love it
 

TN Lion

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Sep 6, 2001
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I'll take a chance on my Tesla catching fire as it is not garage stored anyway as a trade off for a safer car while on the road. That's a no-brainer.

Teslas are safer and here is proof.


Can Safety Scoring, Insurance and FSD get more optimal usage of FSD? Yes.

Insurance and government statistics in US and UK show Tesla’s are among the safest cars involved in the fewest accidents. About 40% below average in US. Very Low accidents involvement in UK (10 times less than Toyota, Ford and several others of number per 10,000 cars).


Has Tesla Autopilot saved lives?
Is Autopilot safe? How many lives would you expect to save by superior automatic lane-keeping? 20-30% of traffic deaths. This automatic lane-keeping is even better than lane warning and blindspot warning systems.

UK Car Statistics

Tesls is among the manufacturers with the least number of accidents per 10,000 models?
Morris – 16
Austin – 26
Tesla – 28
Ferrari – 39
Aston Martin – 40
Lotus – 55
Bentley – 75

This is ten times less than the rate of accident involvement for Ford, Toyota and Mercedes cars in the UK.

US National Highway statistics and crash test analysis all also confirm higher levels of safety with Tesla. This data is reviewed in my youtube video. Insurance Industry data that also confirms higher safety is also reviewed.
 

m.knox

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That might catch on if we could get "babies" included as an ingredient on one of tv's cooking challenges. Progressives would love it

That was one of the funniest trolls in the history of trolling....
 

psuted

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Nov 26, 2010
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Oh my, short Tesla now!

This is not the first time it’s been said that EVs are not as likely to catch fire as vehicles that have an internal combustion engine. Now it has been confirmed with data from the National Transport Safety Board, compiled by AutoinsuranceEZ, which says that hybrid vehicles have the highest fire risk.​
Fully electric vehicles, on the other hand, were deemed far safer than both hybirds and gas cars; they are far less likely to catch fire, with just 25.1 fires per 100,000 sales. That’s compared to 3,474 hybrid fires and 1,529 ICE fires per 100,000 sales respectively.​
When looking at the number of vehicles recalled in 2020 due to fire risk, AutoinsuranceEZ found that ICE topped the table. The only two notable EV recalls were for the Hyundai Kona (82,000 units recalled due to faulty battery packs that could cause a fire) and the highly publicised Chevrolet Bolt EV recall (70,000 units recalled).​

You’re being dishonest. An EV fire is much worse and MUCH more violent than that of an ICE vehicle. An EV fire is like a “detonation” and is likely much less survivable than that of an ICE vehicle. I’m not against EV’s but at least be honest.
 
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psuted

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I love these posts that cause such frenzy in Rumble. As far as cultists go, he's extreme.
He’s pushing EV’s so hard that he sounds intellectually dishonest when it comes to EV’s.
 
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rumble_lion

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You’re being dishonest. An EV fire is much worse and MUCH more violent than that of an ICE vehicle. An EV fire is like a “detonation” and is likely much less survivable than that of an ICE vehicle. I’m not against EV’s but at least be honest.

You’re being dishonest. An EV fire is much worse and MUCH more violent than that of an ICE vehicle.

You are incorrect. I remember reading a story about a Model S that ran over a road sign that was laying the middle of the road. The metal pole of the sign penetrated the battery pack. The driver said the that the computer in the Model displayed an error messaging and advised stopping the car the exiting it. He did and about ten minutes later the car caught on fire. Violent indeed!

In 2013, two extremely unusual Model S collisions resulted in underbody damage that led to car fires. These incidents, unfortunately, received more national headlines than the other 200,000 gasoline car fires that happened last year in North America alone. In both cases, the occupants walked away unharmed, thanks to the car’s safety features. The onboard computer warned the occupants to exit the vehicles, which they did well before any fire was noticeable.​
An EV fire is like a “detonation” and is likely much less survivable than that of an ICE vehicle.

That's really, really terrible. All you need to do now is provide evidence for your claim.
 

rumble_lion

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It’s the omission of facts. And believe me, you’re not upsetting my world view I’m the least.

Like the fact the ICE cars catch on fire far more often then EV's? Oh wait that would be a fact the you omitted.