Test scores lower for teachers

bourbon n blues

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Nov 20, 2019
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https://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/future-teachers-are-scoring-way-low-sat/ Years ago I read somewhere that the test scores on average were the lowest for students entering the colleges of journalism and education. This article talks majors. Currently at PSU's main campus we have these colleges :

Future Teachers Are Scoring Way Low on the SAT​





1 ¾ min
The College Board just released a report on the results of the 2016 SAT test.
One startling feature of the report included a historical timeline of students’ critical reading scores over the last 40-plus years. In 1972, this score was 530. By 2016 it had fallen to 494.
SAT Critical Reading Decline

There are undoubtedly many drivers behind this decline. But another section of the report may shed light on one of those factors, namely, the quality of teachers in our schools.
According to the report, the 2016 SAT test takers named 38 different areas of study – from engineering to psychology – as their intended majors in college. Out of curiosity, I averaged the reading, writing, and math scores of the students in each of these majors and then organized them to see which subject area had the students with the highest SAT scores.
Not surprisingly, students intending to go into multi/interdisciplinary studies or mathematics achieved the top scores.
The frightening part, however, is where education majors fall on the spectrum. Out of 38 majors, the SAT scores of those intending to be teachers rank at number 26.
It’s a common observation that countries which have the best scores on international achievement tests like the PISA exam place great emphasis on recruiting talented and bright individuals to teach in their classrooms. After seeing the SAT scores of those who are heading into education as a career, one has to wonder why the U.S. education system doesn’t seem to be doing the same.
One also has to wonder: would America experience greater rigor in her classrooms if teachers received more training in the subjects they will be teaching – such as math, English, and science – instead of simply receiving training on the latest philosophies and pedagogy techniques? After all, the students pursing math, science, and English hold some of the top SAT scores. Shouldn’t we make it easier and more attractive for those individuals to pass their knowledge on to the next generation?
 
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bourbon n blues

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Nov 20, 2019
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A science major and gifted from what they told me whatever that meant. They didn't disclose our scores .
 

Aardvark86

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Jan 23, 2018
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https://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/future-teachers-are-scoring-way-low-sat/ Years ago I read somewhere that the test scores on average were the lowest for students entering the colleges of journalism and education. This article talks majors. Currently at PSU's main campus we have these colleges :

Future Teachers Are Scoring Way Low on the SAT​





1 ¾ min
The College Board just released a report on the results of the 2016 SAT test.
One startling feature of the report included a historical timeline of students’ critical reading scores over the last 40-plus years. In 1972, this score was 530. By 2016 it had fallen to 494.
SAT Critical Reading Decline

There are undoubtedly many drivers behind this decline. But another section of the report may shed light on one of those factors, namely, the quality of teachers in our schools.
According to the report, the 2016 SAT test takers named 38 different areas of study – from engineering to psychology – as their intended majors in college. Out of curiosity, I averaged the reading, writing, and math scores of the students in each of these majors and then organized them to see which subject area had the students with the highest SAT scores.
Not surprisingly, students intending to go into multi/interdisciplinary studies or mathematics achieved the top scores.
The frightening part, however, is where education majors fall on the spectrum. Out of 38 majors, the SAT scores of those intending to be teachers rank at number 26.
It’s a common observation that countries which have the best scores on international achievement tests like the PISA exam place great emphasis on recruiting talented and bright individuals to teach in their classrooms. After seeing the SAT scores of those who are heading into education as a career, one has to wonder why the U.S. education system doesn’t seem to be doing the same.
One also has to wonder: would America experience greater rigor in her classrooms if teachers received more training in the subjects they will be teaching – such as math, English, and science – instead of simply receiving training on the latest philosophies and pedagogy techniques? After all, the students pursing math, science, and English hold some of the top SAT scores. Shouldn’t we make it easier and more attractive for those individuals to pass their knowledge on to the next generation?
As the old saying goes, those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. Those who can't teach, teach gym.

...and I say that as the child of two teachers.
 

bourbon n blues

Well-Known Member
Nov 20, 2019
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As the old saying goes, those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. Those who can't teach, teach gym.

...and I say that as the child of two teachers.
I've had excellent teachers, btw, I graduated from high school the year the DOEducation started, I think there might be some correlation there. My best friend's wife is an excellent math teacher and her daughters know what a B is allegedly, though she's never had one. Kid is starting her rounds in med school now, while her sister is in bioengineering at PSU.
My high school teachers were excellent overall they cared and they did a great job. My sister had similar teachers. She graduated 1987 btw. she can attest to the same thing you referenced, we all saw the types who were majoring in say bio or chemistry and before you know it it's teaching. My Chem E buddy laughed about the guy who went from Chem E to chemistry to teaching chemistry.
Things haven't changed much since then.
 

PaoliLion

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Nov 2, 2003
11,135
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https://www.intellectualtakeout.org/blog/future-teachers-are-scoring-way-low-sat/ Years ago I read somewhere that the test scores on average were the lowest for students entering the colleges of journalism and education. This article talks majors. Currently at PSU's main campus we have these colleges :

Future Teachers Are Scoring Way Low on the SAT​





1 ¾ min
The College Board just released a report on the results of the 2016 SAT test.
One startling feature of the report included a historical timeline of students’ critical reading scores over the last 40-plus years. In 1972, this score was 530. By 2016 it had fallen to 494.
SAT Critical Reading Decline

There are undoubtedly many drivers behind this decline. But another section of the report may shed light on one of those factors, namely, the quality of teachers in our schools.
According to the report, the 2016 SAT test takers named 38 different areas of study – from engineering to psychology – as their intended majors in college. Out of curiosity, I averaged the reading, writing, and math scores of the students in each of these majors and then organized them to see which subject area had the students with the highest SAT scores.
Not surprisingly, students intending to go into multi/interdisciplinary studies or mathematics achieved the top scores.
The frightening part, however, is where education majors fall on the spectrum. Out of 38 majors, the SAT scores of those intending to be teachers rank at number 26.
It’s a common observation that countries which have the best scores on international achievement tests like the PISA exam place great emphasis on recruiting talented and bright individuals to teach in their classrooms. After seeing the SAT scores of those who are heading into education as a career, one has to wonder why the U.S. education system doesn’t seem to be doing the same.
One also has to wonder: would America experience greater rigor in her classrooms if teachers received more training in the subjects they will be teaching – such as math, English, and science – instead of simply receiving training on the latest philosophies and pedagogy techniques? After all, the students pursing math, science, and English hold some of the top SAT scores. Shouldn’t we make it easier and more attractive for those individuals to pass their knowledge on to the next generation?

This is relatively straight-forward. If you pay teachers more, smarter people would enter the field. Teaching is effectively a min wage job.

Unrelated. Teaching and nursing are also the top fields / destinations for young Republicans.
 

mijowe

Well-Known Member
Aug 6, 2021
272
100
1
The author lacks critical statistic thinking. While she spreads the drop in reading scores out over 40 years the reality is numbers dropped relatively quickly from 530 in 1972 to 502 by 1980 and hovered around 500 thru 2016. The data hasn't changed much in the last 36.

She then ties the drop to the quality of teachers. She can't tell you if the teacher's critical reading skills have dropped from 1972 to 1980 to 2016 because the data is not in this report. It is possible that the teachers have always ranked the same, the 482/26th ranking is status quo.

I was going to ask why she chose to report 2016 scores when 2021 (and all the years in between ) are available. But then I saw the article was written in 2016, way to be timely on posting this.

For Education:
2021 scores are ERW 526 / Math 507
2020 scores are ERW 519 / Math503
Prospective teachers thriving in a pandemic!


 

PSUEngineer89

Well-Known Member
Aug 14, 2021
3,958
6,217
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Most high school teachers did not understand even Algebra.

Yet, for them, it’s all good, no work, all half days, summers off, pensions.