russian sanctions

junior1

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May 29, 2001
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seems as if the sanctions imposed upon russia are not having the desired/stated effect. According to news reports, since imposition of the sanctions, the russians are raking in more cash on oil sales than before imposition of the sanctions. Greedy russians.

Maybe as a means to get back at them and reduce their cash intake, we could take off the sanctions. At the same time we would be eliminating "Putin's tax hike" and our gas prices would go down. Seems like a good plan
 

rll1957

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Feb 5, 2003
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Maybe cutting the ties to Russia and using the gas and oil from America wasn’t so stupid remember the German diplomats mocking trump
 
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Ski

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seems as if the sanctions imposed upon russia are not having the desired/stated effect. According to news reports, since imposition of the sanctions, the russians are raking in more cash on oil sales than before imposition of the sanctions. Greedy russians.

Maybe as a means to get back at them and reduce their cash intake, we could take off the sanctions. At the same time we would be eliminating "Putin's tax hike" and our gas prices would go down. Seems like a good plan

Sanctions have more of an effect than just dollars and cents. They may be flush with cash, but they don't have access to critical components from the West for their advanced weapon systems. Sanctions don't have to single handedly win the war to be part of an overall effective strategy:

By the end of the year, the Russian Federation will almost run out of shells, artillery and armored vehicles - mass media


KATERYNA TYSHCHENKO — WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31, 2022, 5:07 P.M

By the end of 2022, there will be an acute shortage of shells, artillery and armored vehicles in Russia.

Source : The Insider

Literally : "Half a year of war for Russia led not only to colossal irreparable losses in manpower, but also to a huge waste of weapons and military equipment: there are already very few guided missiles, shells for artillery and armored vehicles will be exhausted by the end of the year, and the state of military aviation [does] not allows for a full-scale air campaign.

Due to sanctions, Russia cannot continue full-scale industrial production of weapons and replenish its rapidly depleting stockpiles."

Details : According to the publication's analysis, during six months of aggression against Ukraine, Russia had to spend at least 7 million shells, without taking into account the losses of front-line warehouses as a result of Ukrainian strikes.

"If the intensity of the war is maintained at the current level, Moscow will face a real ammunition shortage by the end of 2022 and will be forced to reduce the use of artillery in order to save money," the text says.

The author also notes the problem of barrel wear. At the same time, if the guides on the reactive systems of volley fire with proper maintenance have a long service life, then the barrels of rifled artillery guns, as well as tank guns, wear out much faster.

As the publication writes, by the end of 2022, the wear and tear of artillery itself will lead to a sharp decrease in its effectiveness.

Thus, the expected projectile famine should coincide with the growing shortage of artillery pieces.

At the same time, as The Insider writes, "things are not going smoothly" in the production of artillery and ammunition.

"Being cut off from supplies of Western equipment, spare parts and materials and at the same time limited in terms of human capital and labor productivity, Russian manufacturers of artillery and ammunition will inevitably face in the near future not so much stagnation as production cuts," the text says.

Also, the shortage of long-range missiles is growing in the Russian Federation. However, Russia masks this deficit by shelling Ukrainian cities with long-range rocket artillery and using S-300/S-400 air defense/anti-aircraft systems to strike ground targets.

It is unlikely that Russian industry has the potential for a serious increase in missile production due not only to the embargo on the supply of equipment and personnel restrictions, but also due to relatively low labor productivity, the text says.

A possible shortage of armored vehicles is also mentioned. "Even taking into account the delivery of relatively fresh, even if not new, armored vehicles from military units and storage bases, the lion's share of them will have to be repaired until the end of 2022 to maintain the high intensity of hostilities, provided that they are not destroyed," he writes. edition.

It notes that the situation in aviation, "at first glance, looks better." Today, taking into account losses and damage, Russia is still able to keep about 400 combat aircraft of various types and about 360 helicopters near the borders, although not all of them are attack.

"However, Russia has been unable to conduct a full-scale air campaign since the beginning of the war, and now its capabilities for such a campaign have only decreased," the article says.
 
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Obliviax

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Sanctions have more of an effect than just dollars and cents. They may be flush with cash, but they don't have access to critical components from the West for their advanced weapon systems. Sanctions don't have to single handedly win the war to be part of an overall effective strategy:

By the end of the year, the Russian Federation will almost run out of shells, artillery and armored vehicles - mass media


KATERYNA TYSHCHENKO — WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 31, 2022, 5:07 P.M

By the end of 2022, there will be an acute shortage of shells, artillery and armored vehicles in Russia.

Source : The Insider

Literally : "Half a year of war for Russia led not only to colossal irreparable losses in manpower, but also to a huge waste of weapons and military equipment: there are already very few guided missiles, shells for artillery and armored vehicles will be exhausted by the end of the year, and the state of military aviation [does] not allows for a full-scale air campaign.

Due to sanctions, Russia cannot continue full-scale industrial production of weapons and replenish its rapidly depleting stockpiles."

Details : According to the publication's analysis, during six months of aggression against Ukraine, Russia had to spend at least 7 million shells, without taking into account the losses of front-line warehouses as a result of Ukrainian strikes.

"If the intensity of the war is maintained at the current level, Moscow will face a real ammunition shortage by the end of 2022 and will be forced to reduce the use of artillery in order to save money," the text says.

The author also notes the problem of barrel wear. At the same time, if the guides on the reactive systems of volley fire with proper maintenance have a long service life, then the barrels of rifled artillery guns, as well as tank guns, wear out much faster.

As the publication writes, by the end of 2022, the wear and tear of artillery itself will lead to a sharp decrease in its effectiveness.

Thus, the expected projectile famine should coincide with the growing shortage of artillery pieces.

At the same time, as The Insider writes, "things are not going smoothly" in the production of artillery and ammunition.

"Being cut off from supplies of Western equipment, spare parts and materials and at the same time limited in terms of human capital and labor productivity, Russian manufacturers of artillery and ammunition will inevitably face in the near future not so much stagnation as production cuts," the text says.

Also, the shortage of long-range missiles is growing in the Russian Federation. However, Russia masks this deficit by shelling Ukrainian cities with long-range rocket artillery and using S-300/S-400 air defense/anti-aircraft systems to strike ground targets.

It is unlikely that Russian industry has the potential for a serious increase in missile production due not only to the embargo on the supply of equipment and personnel restrictions, but also due to relatively low labor productivity, the text says.

A possible shortage of armored vehicles is also mentioned. "Even taking into account the delivery of relatively fresh, even if not new, armored vehicles from military units and storage bases, the lion's share of them will have to be repaired until the end of 2022 to maintain the high intensity of hostilities, provided that they are not destroyed," he writes. edition.

It notes that the situation in aviation, "at first glance, looks better." Today, taking into account losses and damage, Russia is still able to keep about 400 combat aircraft of various types and about 360 helicopters near the borders, although not all of them are attack.

"However, Russia has been unable to conduct a full-scale air campaign since the beginning of the war, and now its capabilities for such a campaign have only decreased," the article says.
i have to disagree with all of the above statements. the Russians, as a people, are incredibly competent at making due with what they have. They didn't defeat the Germans in 1944 due to superior equipment but in mass production of all things. They simply overwhelmed the Germans with numbers. This is where the single-thread communist system is better than our free markets. Putin will simply throw numbers at the problem. I am willing to bet that there is an all-out effort to switch manufacturing to weapons. They will violate every copyright and patent and build their own. Why not? I know of no materials that we restrict them. As to talent, we've seen talent can be bought. Especially today when you don't have to physically be there. I am pretty sure that people in the west are getting a premium price for helping the Russians get information and know-how via Zoom and Google Conference for a handsome salary.

That article reads like someone that studied December 2021 and has no visibility into what can change so quickly if Putin deems it necessary in wartime.
 

Ski

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May 29, 2001
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i have to disagree with all of the above statements. the Russians, as a people, are incredibly competent at making due with what they have. They didn't defeat the Germans in 1944 due to superior equipment but in mass production of all things. They simply overwhelmed the Germans with numbers. This is where the single-thread communist system is better than our free markets. Putin will simply throw numbers at the problem. I am willing to bet that there is an all-out effort to switch manufacturing to weapons. They will violate every copyright and patent and build their own. Why not? I know of no materials that we restrict them. As to talent, we've seen talent can be bought. Especially today when you don't have to physically be there. I am pretty sure that people in the west are getting a premium price for helping the Russians get information and know-how via Zoom and Google Conference for a handsome salary.

That article reads like someone that studied December 2021 and has no visibility into what can change so quickly if Putin deems it necessary in wartime.

I seem to remember substantial amounts of ships delivering war supplies to Arkhangelsk and other Russian ports during WW-II. Their stuff was moved around on ~200,000 Studebaker trucks also not manufactured in Russia. "The Studebaker deserves a monument like those everywhere to the famous T-34 tank,” wrote artilleryman Ilya Maryasin.

Agree with Russia throwing numbers at military situations. The Russians have always had sufficient geographical space to absorb attacks and withstand them until the Russian winter comes to their rescue. Their tactics have not changed since WW-II. Shoot massive quantities of artillery at the enemy reducing everything standing to rubble, send waves of troops as often as needed to capture the rubble. Rinse and repeat.

This won't work as well with high-tech weaponry. If they could have stolen the IP easily to build their own things like the electronic circuitry in their precision guided weapons they would have done so already. Hell, they had the ones they obtained from the West to reverse engineer and still they struggle with production to the point of having to modify S-300 and S-400 air defense systems to hit ground targets.

It is a battle of wills. The West and Ukraine will make this a slog and try to bleed Russia to the point of saying Uncle. The side willing to stay the course the longest will be the ultimate victor. Maybe not militarily, but politically, which is what really matters. Vietnam won few battles but won the war.

Putin has political realities to live with even as a dictator. Stalin was defending the Motherland from an external attack. He had no worries about the Russian people's will to execute a bloody war. Putin started a war against a supposed "brother" peoples to the Russians which was advertised as a "Special Military Operation". We will see how long the Russian people will support this war as more and more Russian blood is spilled in a conflict many believe was unnecessary.
 
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The Spin Meister

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Nov 27, 2012
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An altered state
i have to disagree with all of the above statements. the Russians, as a people, are incredibly competent at making due with what they have. They didn't defeat the Germans in 1944 due to superior equipment but in mass production of all things. They simply overwhelmed the Germans with numbers. This is where the single-thread communist system is better than our free markets. Putin will simply throw numbers at the problem. I am willing to bet that there is an all-out effort to switch manufacturing to weapons. They will violate every copyright and patent and build their own. Why not? I know of no materials that we restrict them. As to talent, we've seen talent can be bought. Especially today when you don't have to physically be there. I am pretty sure that people in the west are getting a premium price for helping the Russians get information and know-how via Zoom and Google Conference for a handsome salary.

That article reads like someone that studied December 2021 and has no visibility into what can change so quickly if Putin deems it necessary in wartime.
They succeeded largely due to the US Lend Lease program. We sent them huge amounts of materials, including aircraft.

Modern weapons use a lot computer chips. Have no idea their capacity to make their own. Probably fairly robust ay resmarter than we are and no better than to depend on a potential enemy for critical supplies.
 

Obliviax

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Aug 21, 2001
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They succeeded largely due to the US Lend Lease program. We sent them huge amounts of materials, including aircraft.

Modern weapons use a lot computer chips. Have no idea their capacity to make their own. Probably fairly robust ay resmarter than we are and no better than to depend on a potential enemy for critical supplies.
true....but the russians beat the germans on the ground IMHO. They beat them with T34s and ground troops. Most of the lend lease tanks didn't get to the soviets until after 1943, when the Soviets were kicking the Nazi's butts all over eastern Europe.

But I do agree, lendlease saved them early and did provide much needed air cover. Looks like about 35% of their aircraft were lendlease.