Repubs vote no to funds for Infant Formula

Hotshoe

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Feb 15, 2012
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Was working for a disinfectant manufacturing company at the time we retooled 4 lines to make disinfectant, increasing our output by 50% without a cent of taxpayer money. Shocking i know.
These people are nothing but political hacks. Look how many times they specifically stated, kids died with zero proof. They don't care. I'm also sure, they perform their jobs 100%, 100% of the time. They also never return defective items of any sort because that never happens.
 

lurkerlion

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Aug 2, 2011
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Not force them to reopen. Rather cut through the supply chain to get the necessary equipment. It would be using a sledgehammer unnecessarily, but it might get it done quicker. I dunno, just throwing spaghetti around, but the administration tried nothing.
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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The plant didn't kill any kids according to the CDC investigation. But keep that narrative going.

They don't know that.

Abbott says there is no evidence to link its formulas to these illnesses. The FDA and the CDC have not disclosed any information that connects the illnesses and the plant. FDA officials said that the investigation was impeded by having only two of the four sickened babies' clinical samples.​
The CDC analyzed clinical samples from two of the infants and did not find a genetic match to the environmental strains found at the plant. It also said the bacteria from the patient samples were not closely related to one another.​
The FDA and Abbott tested environmental and product samples at the plant. They found five environmental samples containing Cronobacter sakazakii. The product samples tested negative.​
The plant has a pretty bad history of problems. Good to know that instead of spending money fixing the issues at this plant Abbot bought back billions of dollars of it's own stock.
September 2019: The FDA conducts an inspection of the Sturgis plant, with one infraction on testing.​
Sept. 20, 2021: The FDA conducts an inspection of the plant, noting that personnel working directly with formula didn't properly wash their hands when needed and didn't change gloves after touching "non-food" contact surfaces.​
"You did not maintain a building used in the manufacture, processing, packing or holding of infant formula in a clean and sanitary condition," the FDA concludes in its September 2021 report.​
On the same day that FDA inspectors are inside the Sturgis plant, the Minnesota Department of Health alerts the agency that an infant was sickened by a bacteria called Cronobacter sakazakii after drinking formula produced in the Sturgis plant. Investigators later, however, do not find a substantive link between the plant's formula and the child's illness.​
Oct. 20, 2021: In a 34-page document, a whistleblower at the plant alleges to the FDA that Abbott has been releasing untested infant formula, hiding information during past FDA audits and imposing lax cleaning practices. None of these claims have been independently verified. According to Rep. Rosa DeLauro, a Democrat from Connecticut, who later releases the whistleblower report, the FDA interviews that person in late December.​
Feb. 1, 2022: The FDA collects samples at the plant that confirm the presence of the dangerous Cronobacter bacteria and cite several violations, according to an inspection report.
Feb. 17, 2022: The FDA says it is investigating reports of four illnesses in three states, including one baby who died. Abbott announces a voluntary recall of potentially affected products, including Similac, Alimentum and EleCare powdered formulas manufactured in its Sturgis facility.​
Feb. 28, 2022: The FDA announces a second death and Abbott expands its recall.​
 
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bourbon n blues

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Nov 20, 2019
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They don't know that.

Abbott says there is no evidence to link its formulas to these illnesses. The FDA and the CDC have not disclosed any information that connects the illnesses and the plant. FDA officials said that the investigation was impeded by having only two of the four sickened babies' clinical samples.​
The CDC analyzed clinical samples from two of the infants and did not find a genetic match to the environmental strains found at the plant. It also said the bacteria from the patient samples were not closely related to one another.​
The FDA and Abbott tested environmental and product samples at the plant. They found five environmental samples containing Cronobacter sakazakii. The product samples tested negative.​
The plant has a pretty bad history of problems. Good to know that instead of spending money fixing the issues at this plant Abbot bought back billions of dollars of it's own stock.
September 2019: The FDA conducts an inspection of the Sturgis plant, with one infraction on testing.​
Sept. 20, 2021: The FDA conducts an inspection of the plant, noting that personnel working directly with formula didn't properly wash their hands when needed and didn't change gloves after touching "non-food" contact surfaces.​
"You did not maintain a building used in the manufacture, processing, packing or holding of infant formula in a clean and sanitary condition," the FDA concludes in its September 2021 report.​
On the same day that FDA inspectors are inside the Sturgis plant, the Minnesota Department of Health alerts the agency that an infant was sickened by a bacteria called Cronobacter sakazakii after drinking formula produced in the Sturgis plant. Investigators later, however, do not find a substantive link between the plant's formula and the child's illness.​
Oct. 20, 2021: In a 34-page document, a whistleblower at the plant alleges to the FDA that Abbott has been releasing untested infant formula, hiding information during past FDA audits and imposing lax cleaning practices. None of these claims have been independently verified. According to Rep. Rosa DeLauro, a Democrat from Connecticut, who later releases the whistleblower report, the FDA interviews that person in late December.​
Feb. 1, 2022: The FDA collects samples at the plant that confirm the presence of the dangerous Cronobacter bacteria and cite several violations, according to an inspection report.
Feb. 17, 2022: The FDA says it is investigating reports of four illnesses in three states, including one baby who died. Abbott announces a voluntary recall of potentially affected products, including Similac, Alimentum and EleCare powdered formulas manufactured in its Sturgis facility.​
Feb. 28, 2022: The FDA announces a second death and Abbott expands its recall.​
🙄
 
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bdgan

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May 29, 2008
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They don't know that.

Abbott says there is no evidence to link its formulas to these illnesses. The FDA and the CDC have not disclosed any information that connects the illnesses and the plant. FDA officials said that the investigation was impeded by having only two of the four sickened babies' clinical samples.​
The CDC analyzed clinical samples from two of the infants and did not find a genetic match to the environmental strains found at the plant. It also said the bacteria from the patient samples were not closely related to one another.​
The FDA and Abbott tested environmental and product samples at the plant. They found five environmental samples containing Cronobacter sakazakii. The product samples tested negative.​
The plant has a pretty bad history of problems. Good to know that instead of spending money fixing the issues at this plant Abbot bought back billions of dollars of it's own stock.
September 2019: The FDA conducts an inspection of the Sturgis plant, with one infraction on testing.​
Sept. 20, 2021: The FDA conducts an inspection of the plant, noting that personnel working directly with formula didn't properly wash their hands when needed and didn't change gloves after touching "non-food" contact surfaces.​
"You did not maintain a building used in the manufacture, processing, packing or holding of infant formula in a clean and sanitary condition," the FDA concludes in its September 2021 report.​
On the same day that FDA inspectors are inside the Sturgis plant, the Minnesota Department of Health alerts the agency that an infant was sickened by a bacteria called Cronobacter sakazakii after drinking formula produced in the Sturgis plant. Investigators later, however, do not find a substantive link between the plant's formula and the child's illness.​
Oct. 20, 2021: In a 34-page document, a whistleblower at the plant alleges to the FDA that Abbott has been releasing untested infant formula, hiding information during past FDA audits and imposing lax cleaning practices. None of these claims have been independently verified. According to Rep. Rosa DeLauro, a Democrat from Connecticut, who later releases the whistleblower report, the FDA interviews that person in late December.​
Feb. 1, 2022: The FDA collects samples at the plant that confirm the presence of the dangerous Cronobacter bacteria and cite several violations, according to an inspection report.
Feb. 17, 2022: The FDA says it is investigating reports of four illnesses in three states, including one baby who died. Abbott announces a voluntary recall of potentially affected products, including Similac, Alimentum and EleCare powdered formulas manufactured in its Sturgis facility.​
Feb. 28, 2022: The FDA announces a second death and Abbott expands its recall.​
The government should produce baby formula. Then nobody would have any. That would be EQUITY.
 
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rumble_lion

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Do you realize it is extremely easy to make baby formula?

It's regulation and import bans that make it tough.

LdN

Do you realize it is extremely easy to make baby formula?

When you look at the history of Abbot Sturgis plant it appears for them at least be very difficult to make baby formula that isn't contaminated.

It's easy to make baby formula that is tainted with a bunch of different strains of bacteria.
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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The government should produce baby formula. Then nobody would have any. That would be EQUITY.

Nah, pumping up shareholders pocket books is more important. So what if a few babies get sick. They can't even talk to complain about it.
 

LionDeNittany

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May 29, 2001
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Do you realize it is extremely easy to make baby formula?

When you look at the history of Abbot Sturgis plant it appears for them at least be very difficult to make baby formula that isn't contaminated.

It's easy to make baby formula that is tainted with a bunch of different strains of bacteria.

Almost anything you eat has bacteria.

The threshold is way too high. And because of that we will end up with starving kids instead of healthy ones.

Ldn
 
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bdgan

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Nah, pumping up shareholders pocket books is more important. So what if a few babies get sick. They can't even talk to complain about it.
You Libs are disgusting. Every time something goes wrong you accuse companies of putting profits over safety. That's absurd. Companies lose profits if their reputation is destroyed.

I remember Toyota sudden acceleration. Turns out it was floor mats getting pushed against peddles.
 

Hotshoe

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Feb 15, 2012
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They don't know that.

Abbott says there is no evidence to link its formulas to these illnesses. The FDA and the CDC have not disclosed any information that connects the illnesses and the plant. FDA officials said that the investigation was impeded by having only two of the four sickened babies' clinical samples.​
The CDC analyzed clinical samples from two of the infants and did not find a genetic match to the environmental strains found at the plant. It also said the bacteria from the patient samples were not closely related to one another.​
The FDA and Abbott tested environmental and product samples at the plant. They found five environmental samples containing Cronobacter sakazakii. The product samples tested negative.​
The plant has a pretty bad history of problems. Good to know that instead of spending money fixing the issues at this plant Abbot bought back billions of dollars of it's own stock.
September 2019: The FDA conducts an inspection of the Sturgis plant, with one infraction on testing.​
Sept. 20, 2021: The FDA conducts an inspection of the plant, noting that personnel working directly with formula didn't properly wash their hands when needed and didn't change gloves after touching "non-food" contact surfaces.​
"You did not maintain a building used in the manufacture, processing, packing or holding of infant formula in a clean and sanitary condition," the FDA concludes in its September 2021 report.​
On the same day that FDA inspectors are inside the Sturgis plant, the Minnesota Department of Health alerts the agency that an infant was sickened by a bacteria called Cronobacter sakazakii after drinking formula produced in the Sturgis plant. Investigators later, however, do not find a substantive link between the plant's formula and the child's illness.​
Oct. 20, 2021: In a 34-page document, a whistleblower at the plant alleges to the FDA that Abbott has been releasing untested infant formula, hiding information during past FDA audits and imposing lax cleaning practices. None of these claims have been independently verified. According to Rep. Rosa DeLauro, a Democrat from Connecticut, who later releases the whistleblower report, the FDA interviews that person in late December.​
Feb. 1, 2022: The FDA collects samples at the plant that confirm the presence of the dangerous Cronobacter bacteria and cite several violations, according to an inspection report.
Feb. 17, 2022: The FDA says it is investigating reports of four illnesses in three states, including one baby who died. Abbott announces a voluntary recall of potentially affected products, including Similac, Alimentum and EleCare powdered formulas manufactured in its Sturgis facility.​
Feb. 28, 2022: The FDA announces a second death and Abbott expands its recall.​
So, what you have is absolutely nothing. I'm sure, you are 100% in everything you do. Keep reaching, it's beyond pathetic. And all for politics.
 
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pawrestlersintn

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Jan 26, 2013
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Do you realize it is extremely easy to make baby formula?

When you look at the history of Abbot Sturgis plant it appears for them at least be very difficult to make baby formula that isn't contaminated.

It's easy to make baby formula that is tainted with a bunch of different strains of bacteria.
I don't see anything in your history of the plant that they produced contaminated formula. Where does it say that?
 
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LafayetteBear

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Dec 1, 2009
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They don't know that.

Abbott says there is no evidence to link its formulas to these illnesses. The FDA and the CDC have not disclosed any information that connects the illnesses and the plant. FDA officials said that the investigation was impeded by having only two of the four sickened babies' clinical samples.​
The CDC analyzed clinical samples from two of the infants and did not find a genetic match to the environmental strains found at the plant. It also said the bacteria from the patient samples were not closely related to one another.​
The FDA and Abbott tested environmental and product samples at the plant. They found five environmental samples containing Cronobacter sakazakii. The product samples tested negative.​
The plant has a pretty bad history of problems. Good to know that instead of spending money fixing the issues at this plant Abbot bought back billions of dollars of it's own stock.
September 2019: The FDA conducts an inspection of the Sturgis plant, with one infraction on testing.​
Sept. 20, 2021: The FDA conducts an inspection of the plant, noting that personnel working directly with formula didn't properly wash their hands when needed and didn't change gloves after touching "non-food" contact surfaces.​
"You did not maintain a building used in the manufacture, processing, packing or holding of infant formula in a clean and sanitary condition," the FDA concludes in its September 2021 report.​
On the same day that FDA inspectors are inside the Sturgis plant, the Minnesota Department of Health alerts the agency that an infant was sickened by a bacteria called Cronobacter sakazakii after drinking formula produced in the Sturgis plant. Investigators later, however, do not find a substantive link between the plant's formula and the child's illness.​
Oct. 20, 2021: In a 34-page document, a whistleblower at the plant alleges to the FDA that Abbott has been releasing untested infant formula, hiding information during past FDA audits and imposing lax cleaning practices. None of these claims have been independently verified. According to Rep. Rosa DeLauro, a Democrat from Connecticut, who later releases the whistleblower report, the FDA interviews that person in late December.​
Feb. 1, 2022: The FDA collects samples at the plant that confirm the presence of the dangerous Cronobacter bacteria and cite several violations, according to an inspection report.
Feb. 17, 2022: The FDA says it is investigating reports of four illnesses in three states, including one baby who died. Abbott announces a voluntary recall of potentially affected products, including Similac, Alimentum and EleCare powdered formulas manufactured in its Sturgis facility.​
Feb. 28, 2022: The FDA announces a second death and Abbott expands its recall.​
Thanks again for posting actual FACTS, Rumble. We need to remind these RWNJ's of actual facts now and then. I particularly love their ignorant, and therefore asinine, comments, such as this one from LdN:

Do you realize it is extremely easy to make baby formula?

It's regulation and import bans that make it tough.

These RWNJ's a a constant reminder of the old adage that "you can't fix stupid."
 
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rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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You Libs are disgusting. Every time something goes wrong you accuse companies of putting profits over safety. That's absurd. Companies lose profits if their reputation is destroyed.

I remember Toyota sudden acceleration. Turns out it was floor mats getting pushed against peddles.

You Libs are disgusting. Every time something goes wrong you accuse companies of putting profits over safety. That's absurd. Companies lose profits if their reputation is destroyed.

They don't plan to destroy their reputation. The lure of short term profits to too great.
 

Lion8286

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Sep 1, 2008
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Thanks again for posting actual FACTS, Rumble. We need to remind these RWNJ's of actual facts now and then. I particularly love their ignorant, and therefore asinine, comments, such as this one from LdN:



These RWNJ's a a constant reminder of the old adage that "you can't fix stupid."

Still waiting for you to answer my question, LB. It's been a day now, plenty of time to make something up.
 
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rumble_lion

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So, what you have is absolutely nothing. I'm sure, you are 100% in everything you do. Keep reaching, it's beyond pathetic. And all for politics.

I'm just pointing out a bad actor here. Not sure why are up in arms over it.

Why do allow just 4 giant corporations to supply 90% of the baby formula in the US? It's just a crisis waiting to happen.
 

interrobang

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Aug 21, 2016
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Oh no, they got busted for not washing their hands. It must mean everyone is going to die. And it's already been announced that the infant deaths had nothing to do with the formula.

Take a look at your state health department inspections. I bet your favorite restaurant has had violations.
 
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LionDeNittany

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May 29, 2001
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I'm just pointing out a bad actor here. Not sure why are up in arms over it.

Why do allow just 4 giant corporations to supply 90% of the baby formula in the US? It's just a crisis waiting to happen.

Because, like a lot of products, regulation has made scale necessary to compete.

That's what happens with a lot of regulation. To manage the regulation costs you need to be bigger and bigger.

LdN
 
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LafayetteBear

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Still waiting for you to answer my question, LB. It's been a day now, plenty of time to make something up.
What need is there to make anything up, dufus? Read the following linked article for yourself. You will discover that neither the FDA nor Joe Biden caused this shortage. Abbott Laboratories managed that all by itself. To compound things, Abbott has traditionally made roughly 25% of this country's supply of baby formula.

Joe Biden deserves credit for doing something about the shortage. You deserve mockery for your ignorant braying.

 
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rumble_lion

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Oh no, they got busted for not washing their hands. It must mean everyone is going to die. And it's already been announced that the infant deaths had nothing to do with the formula.

Take a look at your state health department inspections. I bet your favorite restaurant has had violations.

I know it's difficult for a multi billion dollar corporation to make sure it's employees wash their hands and all but they are making food for new born babies to maybe they can put forth a little bit of effort? Is that too much to ask?
 

Lion8286

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Sep 1, 2008
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What need is there to make anything up, dufus? Read the following linked article for yourself. You will discover that neither the FDA nor Joe Biden caused this shortage. Abbott Laboratories managed that all by itself. To compound things, Abbott has traditionally made roughly 25% of this country's supply of baby formula.

Joe Biden deserves credit for doing something about the shortage. You deserve mockery for your ignorant braying.


Hey DOOFUS.

Again, answer my question. Why do the democrats want to give the FDA $28M more of taxpayer money just to do what they are already paid to do??
 
Last edited:

rumble_lion

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Because, like a lot of products, regulation has made scale necessary to compete.

That's what happens with a lot of regulation. To manage the regulation costs you need to be bigger and bigger.

LdN

Ahhh, so the problem with the baby formula is too many regulations? If we just get rid of all these pesky food regulation then big corporation could finally compete?

Somalia doesn't have any regulations, heck they don't even have a functioning government and yet somehow it's not a paradise.
 

interrobang

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Aug 21, 2016
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I know it's difficult for a multi billion dollar corporation to make sure it's employees wash their hands and all but they are making food for new born babies to maybe they can put forth a little bit of effort? Is that too much to ask?
It is difficult. Health code violations happen everywhere.
 
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Lion8286

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Why do you believe they are babies?

Why do you believe they are not?

You still haven't answered my question above. You can't construct a proper sentence.

"Why do ________allow just 4 giant corporations to supply 90% of the baby formula in the US?"
 

LionDeNittany

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May 29, 2001
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Ahhh, so the problem with the baby formula is too many regulations? If we just get rid of all these pesky food regulation then big corporation could finally compete?

Somalia doesn't have any regulations, heck they don't even have a functioning government and yet somehow it's not a paradise.

No one said no regulations.

LdN
 
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PaoliLion

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Nov 2, 2003
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The repubs/cons only say no = no ideas on how to improve anything.


WASHINGTON — House GOP leaders were among the 192 Republicans who voted against providing $28 million in aid to the Food and Drug Administration to address the shortage of baby formula — within days of criticizing President Biden for not doing enough on the issue.

House minority leader Kevin McCarthy of California, whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana, and conference chair Elise Stefanik of New York voted late Wednesday against the measure to provide new FDA funding, which the House approved on a largely party-line vote of 231 to 192. Twelve Republicans broke ranks and joined with Democrats in backing the money.

Republicans are “for profit” at all costs. That simply means “pricing gouging is a ‘good thing’”
 
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