Replacement Theory is now mainstream

2lion70

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2004
15,655
5,077
1
Now about 1 in 3 US citizens believe in this racist nonsense led by Fox News and the Reoub party;

A 180-page online screed attributed to the white man accused of killing 10 people at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on Saturday has brought a once-fringe white extremist conspiracy theory into the spotlight. But the underpinnings of the "great replacement" conspiracy theory, which has been iterated on over time to appeal to wider audiences, has penetrated a much more mainstream portion of American society. A recent poll, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that one in three American adults now believes in a version of replacement theory.

The speed with which this false narrative has tipped into American discourse since a French ethnonationalist first coined the term roughly a decade ago has stunned even extremism experts who have tracked the spread of hate-filled ideologies. They cite the failure of major social media platforms to effectively moderate such content, the role of Fox News hosts in amplifying these ideas, and the uptake of the conspiracy's language by some elected Republican officials.

Demographic change​

Between 2010 and 2020, the percentage of Americans who identified as "white only" declined by more than 10 percent, from 72 to 62 percent. During that same decade, several Western European countries saw record influxes of migrants from Muslim nations. It is against the backdrop of this demographic change that replacement rhetoric has accelerated in recent years.

Sponsor Message


"In the U.S., [it's] often called 'white genocide.' In Europe, [it's] called 'Eurabia,' " said Cynthia Miller-Idriss, professor and director of the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at American University.

The baseless theories claim that these population shifts are orchestrated by elite power holders. In the U.S., Miller-Idriss said white nationalists ascribe the plot to Jews who they believe are bringing in immigrants and promoting interracial marriage to suppress whites. In Europe, the false narrative blames elite politicians for a growing Muslim population. Miller-Idriss said the coining of the term "great replacement" in France marked a key moment in the growth of these beliefs.

"It has unified and really spread [the conspiracies] online in memes and videos and in a lot of propaganda," she said. "It capitalized on a moment when you're not just reading written propaganda or sharing it in a newsletter or in a small group in a backwoods militia. But it's circulating in these dark online spaces where this [alleged] Buffalo shooter writes he was exposed and radicalized."

From there, the conspiracy theories migrated toward progressively less fringe conservative media platforms, said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

"We have literally watched as ideas that originate on white supremacist message boards, or like the dark web – the places that are very difficult to get to – move," said Greenblatt. "They literally jump to [internet message boards like] 4chan and 8chan, which are much more accessible, [then] they jump to web sites like The Daily Caller or Breitbart, and then they jump to Tucker Carlson's talking points or Laura Ingraham's talking points, or other AM radio DJs' talking points. And then you have theoretically mainstream Republican politicians repeating some of this stuff."

Carlson and Ingraham are Fox News hosts.

"Sanitizing" the message​

Although the roots of the "great replacement" are firmly planted in the organized white supremacist movement, a version of the baseless conspiracy has spread among a wider swath of Americans with some minor tweaking of language. Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, said that Carlson has framed the issue around voter replacement.

"What he says is that the Democrats are importing immigrants and that they are replacing Americans," said Gertz. "But no one should really be confused by what he is trying to do. The specific cases that he's talking about are Central American immigrants, they are immigrants from Africa, they are immigrants from the Middle East."


Tucker Carlson speaks at a convention in Esztergom, Hungary on August 7, 2021.
Janos Kummer/Getty Images
Greenblatt, whose organization has repeatedly called on Fox News to fire Carlson, said figures such as Carlson have sought language that might be palatable to more Americans. In moving away from white nationalist terms like "white genocide" and "Jewish cabal," they have repackaged the conspiracy as one driven by political partisanship.

"It has been an intentional effort ... to take these ideas and to try to sanitize them ... so they could bring their ideas into the mainstream," said Greenblatt.

Fox News declined to comment in response to questions from NPR about the role that critics say Carlson and Ingraham have played in stoking fears over replacement.

Greenblatt, Gertz and Miller-Idriss say claims of an orchestrated "immigrant invasion" have gained legitimacy through the endorsement of some elected Republicans, most notably former President Donald Trump. But they note that the messaging has continued after Trump left office.

"Elise Stefanik has pushed the same thing," said Gertz, referring to the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives. "This is moving steadily into mainstream Republican politics."

How to fight a pervasive conspiracy theory?​

The document believed to have been written by the suspected gunman in the Buffalo attack does not ascribe his radicalization to Fox News or rhetoric of politicians. Rather, he describes it as taking place on the same internet chat boards that were early to adopt the language of the racist "great replacement" conspiracy theory, such as 4chan.

"[Those are] still, I think, the spaces and places we should be most worried about," said Miller-Idriss.

Still, Miller-Idriss and other extremism experts say the mainstreaming of "replacement" theory remains alarming. Greenblatt said it isn't enough to condemn the violence, because speech that dehumanizes other people – whether Blacks, immigrants or Jews – can inspire violence.

"What I would suggest is that people in positions of authority, who have platforms, should use those platforms responsibly and call out this kind of ugliness and cease the incitement immediately because it's too dangerous to do otherwise," he said.

In the wake of the tragedy, much attention is focusing on whether stricter gun laws might have prevented it, the role of social media, whether the suspected gunman had a history of mental health problems, and whether law enforcement authorities missed early red flags.

"But all of that really doesn't make a difference if [individuals] in the end don't have a basic understanding of the legacy of racism, of structural racism [and of] systemic racism in this country," said Miller-Idriss.

She said that many young people observe the racial disparities in American society and will seek out answers to them. The document believed to be linked to the suspect pulls data from dubious online sources to support spurious claims of biological racism and crime rates.

"They may not be talking about it from good academic sources or good learning sources," Miller-Idriss said, "but they're going to be hearing about it in dark online spaces instead."
 

Lion8286

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
15,015
21,682
1
Now about 1 in 3 US citizens believe in this racist nonsense led by Fox News and the Reoub party;

A 180-page online screed attributed to the white man accused of killing 10 people at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on Saturday has brought a once-fringe white extremist conspiracy theory into the spotlight. But the underpinnings of the "great replacement" conspiracy theory, which has been iterated on over time to appeal to wider audiences, has penetrated a much more mainstream portion of American society. A recent poll, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that one in three American adults now believes in a version of replacement theory.

The speed with which this false narrative has tipped into American discourse since a French ethnonationalist first coined the term roughly a decade ago has stunned even extremism experts who have tracked the spread of hate-filled ideologies. They cite the failure of major social media platforms to effectively moderate such content, the role of Fox News hosts in amplifying these ideas, and the uptake of the conspiracy's language by some elected Republican officials.

Demographic change​

Between 2010 and 2020, the percentage of Americans who identified as "white only" declined by more than 10 percent, from 72 to 62 percent. During that same decade, several Western European countries saw record influxes of migrants from Muslim nations. It is against the backdrop of this demographic change that replacement rhetoric has accelerated in recent years.

Sponsor Message


"In the U.S., [it's] often called 'white genocide.' In Europe, [it's] called 'Eurabia,' " said Cynthia Miller-Idriss, professor and director of the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at American University.

The baseless theories claim that these population shifts are orchestrated by elite power holders. In the U.S., Miller-Idriss said white nationalists ascribe the plot to Jews who they believe are bringing in immigrants and promoting interracial marriage to suppress whites. In Europe, the false narrative blames elite politicians for a growing Muslim population. Miller-Idriss said the coining of the term "great replacement" in France marked a key moment in the growth of these beliefs.

"It has unified and really spread [the conspiracies] online in memes and videos and in a lot of propaganda," she said. "It capitalized on a moment when you're not just reading written propaganda or sharing it in a newsletter or in a small group in a backwoods militia. But it's circulating in these dark online spaces where this [alleged] Buffalo shooter writes he was exposed and radicalized."

From there, the conspiracy theories migrated toward progressively less fringe conservative media platforms, said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

"We have literally watched as ideas that originate on white supremacist message boards, or like the dark web – the places that are very difficult to get to – move," said Greenblatt. "They literally jump to [internet message boards like] 4chan and 8chan, which are much more accessible, [then] they jump to web sites like The Daily Caller or Breitbart, and then they jump to Tucker Carlson's talking points or Laura Ingraham's talking points, or other AM radio DJs' talking points. And then you have theoretically mainstream Republican politicians repeating some of this stuff."

Carlson and Ingraham are Fox News hosts.

"Sanitizing" the message​

Although the roots of the "great replacement" are firmly planted in the organized white supremacist movement, a version of the baseless conspiracy has spread among a wider swath of Americans with some minor tweaking of language. Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, said that Carlson has framed the issue around voter replacement.

"What he says is that the Democrats are importing immigrants and that they are replacing Americans," said Gertz. "But no one should really be confused by what he is trying to do. The specific cases that he's talking about are Central American immigrants, they are immigrants from Africa, they are immigrants from the Middle East."


Tucker Carlson speaks at a convention in Esztergom, Hungary on August 7, 2021.
Janos Kummer/Getty Images
Greenblatt, whose organization has repeatedly called on Fox News to fire Carlson, said figures such as Carlson have sought language that might be palatable to more Americans. In moving away from white nationalist terms like "white genocide" and "Jewish cabal," they have repackaged the conspiracy as one driven by political partisanship.

"It has been an intentional effort ... to take these ideas and to try to sanitize them ... so they could bring their ideas into the mainstream," said Greenblatt.

Fox News declined to comment in response to questions from NPR about the role that critics say Carlson and Ingraham have played in stoking fears over replacement.

Greenblatt, Gertz and Miller-Idriss say claims of an orchestrated "immigrant invasion" have gained legitimacy through the endorsement of some elected Republicans, most notably former President Donald Trump. But they note that the messaging has continued after Trump left office.

"Elise Stefanik has pushed the same thing," said Gertz, referring to the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives. "This is moving steadily into mainstream Republican politics."

How to fight a pervasive conspiracy theory?​

The document believed to have been written by the suspected gunman in the Buffalo attack does not ascribe his radicalization to Fox News or rhetoric of politicians. Rather, he describes it as taking place on the same internet chat boards that were early to adopt the language of the racist "great replacement" conspiracy theory, such as 4chan.

"[Those are] still, I think, the spaces and places we should be most worried about," said Miller-Idriss.

Still, Miller-Idriss and other extremism experts say the mainstreaming of "replacement" theory remains alarming. Greenblatt said it isn't enough to condemn the violence, because speech that dehumanizes other people – whether Blacks, immigrants or Jews – can inspire violence.

"What I would suggest is that people in positions of authority, who have platforms, should use those platforms responsibly and call out this kind of ugliness and cease the incitement immediately because it's too dangerous to do otherwise," he said.

In the wake of the tragedy, much attention is focusing on whether stricter gun laws might have prevented it, the role of social media, whether the suspected gunman had a history of mental health problems, and whether law enforcement authorities missed early red flags.

"But all of that really doesn't make a difference if [individuals] in the end don't have a basic understanding of the legacy of racism, of structural racism [and of] systemic racism in this country," said Miller-Idriss.

She said that many young people observe the racial disparities in American society and will seek out answers to them. The document believed to be linked to the suspect pulls data from dubious online sources to support spurious claims of biological racism and crime rates.

"They may not be talking about it from good academic sources or good learning sources," Miller-Idriss said, "but they're going to be hearing about it in dark online spaces instead."

From barely mentioned to mainstream in 3 days. That's a new libtard record, 2Lyin.
 

MarkPSU

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
4,610
2,188
1
Maybe 1 out of a hundred thousand conservatives ever heard of it and even fewer would subscribe to it. Just another well devised political talking point by the left. Got it hand it to them though. They are masters of creating these issues.
 

bourbon n blues

Well-Known Member
Nov 20, 2019
19,147
21,717
1
Maybe 1 out of a hundred thousand conservatives ever heard of it and even fewer would subscribe to it. Just another well devised political talking point by the left. Got it hand it to them though. They are masters of creating these issues.
Because they have morons like him to buy this bs.
 
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junior1

Well-Known Member
May 29, 2001
5,260
5,088
1
Now about 1 in 3 US citizens believe in this racist nonsense led by Fox News and the Reoub party;

A 180-page online screed attributed to the white man accused of killing 10 people at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on Saturday has brought a once-fringe white extremist conspiracy theory into the spotlight. But the underpinnings of the "great replacement" conspiracy theory, which has been iterated on over time to appeal to wider audiences, has penetrated a much more mainstream portion of American society. A recent poll, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that one in three American adults now believes in a version of replacement theory.

The speed with which this false narrative has tipped into American discourse since a French ethnonationalist first coined the term roughly a decade ago has stunned even extremism experts who have tracked the spread of hate-filled ideologies. They cite the failure of major social media platforms to effectively moderate such content, the role of Fox News hosts in amplifying these ideas, and the uptake of the conspiracy's language by some elected Republican officials.

Demographic change​

Between 2010 and 2020, the percentage of Americans who identified as "white only" declined by more than 10 percent, from 72 to 62 percent. During that same decade, several Western European countries saw record influxes of migrants from Muslim nations. It is against the backdrop of this demographic change that replacement rhetoric has accelerated in recent years.

Sponsor Message


"In the U.S., [it's] often called 'white genocide.' In Europe, [it's] called 'Eurabia,' " said Cynthia Miller-Idriss, professor and director of the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at American University.

The baseless theories claim that these population shifts are orchestrated by elite power holders. In the U.S., Miller-Idriss said white nationalists ascribe the plot to Jews who they believe are bringing in immigrants and promoting interracial marriage to suppress whites. In Europe, the false narrative blames elite politicians for a growing Muslim population. Miller-Idriss said the coining of the term "great replacement" in France marked a key moment in the growth of these beliefs.

"It has unified and really spread [the conspiracies] online in memes and videos and in a lot of propaganda," she said. "It capitalized on a moment when you're not just reading written propaganda or sharing it in a newsletter or in a small group in a backwoods militia. But it's circulating in these dark online spaces where this [alleged] Buffalo shooter writes he was exposed and radicalized."

From there, the conspiracy theories migrated toward progressively less fringe conservative media platforms, said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

"We have literally watched as ideas that originate on white supremacist message boards, or like the dark web – the places that are very difficult to get to – move," said Greenblatt. "They literally jump to [internet message boards like] 4chan and 8chan, which are much more accessible, [then] they jump to web sites like The Daily Caller or Breitbart, and then they jump to Tucker Carlson's talking points or Laura Ingraham's talking points, or other AM radio DJs' talking points. And then you have theoretically mainstream Republican politicians repeating some of this stuff."

Carlson and Ingraham are Fox News hosts.

"Sanitizing" the message​

Although the roots of the "great replacement" are firmly planted in the organized white supremacist movement, a version of the baseless conspiracy has spread among a wider swath of Americans with some minor tweaking of language. Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, said that Carlson has framed the issue around voter replacement.

"What he says is that the Democrats are importing immigrants and that they are replacing Americans," said Gertz. "But no one should really be confused by what he is trying to do. The specific cases that he's talking about are Central American immigrants, they are immigrants from Africa, they are immigrants from the Middle East."


Tucker Carlson speaks at a convention in Esztergom, Hungary on August 7, 2021.
Janos Kummer/Getty Images
Greenblatt, whose organization has repeatedly called on Fox News to fire Carlson, said figures such as Carlson have sought language that might be palatable to more Americans. In moving away from white nationalist terms like "white genocide" and "Jewish cabal," they have repackaged the conspiracy as one driven by political partisanship.

"It has been an intentional effort ... to take these ideas and to try to sanitize them ... so they could bring their ideas into the mainstream," said Greenblatt.

Fox News declined to comment in response to questions from NPR about the role that critics say Carlson and Ingraham have played in stoking fears over replacement.

Greenblatt, Gertz and Miller-Idriss say claims of an orchestrated "immigrant invasion" have gained legitimacy through the endorsement of some elected Republicans, most notably former President Donald Trump. But they note that the messaging has continued after Trump left office.

"Elise Stefanik has pushed the same thing," said Gertz, referring to the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives. "This is moving steadily into mainstream Republican politics."

How to fight a pervasive conspiracy theory?​

The document believed to have been written by the suspected gunman in the Buffalo attack does not ascribe his radicalization to Fox News or rhetoric of politicians. Rather, he describes it as taking place on the same internet chat boards that were early to adopt the language of the racist "great replacement" conspiracy theory, such as 4chan.

"[Those are] still, I think, the spaces and places we should be most worried about," said Miller-Idriss.

Still, Miller-Idriss and other extremism experts say the mainstreaming of "replacement" theory remains alarming. Greenblatt said it isn't enough to condemn the violence, because speech that dehumanizes other people – whether Blacks, immigrants or Jews – can inspire violence.

"What I would suggest is that people in positions of authority, who have platforms, should use those platforms responsibly and call out this kind of ugliness and cease the incitement immediately because it's too dangerous to do otherwise," he said.

In the wake of the tragedy, much attention is focusing on whether stricter gun laws might have prevented it, the role of social media, whether the suspected gunman had a history of mental health problems, and whether law enforcement authorities missed early red flags.

"But all of that really doesn't make a difference if [individuals] in the end don't have a basic understanding of the legacy of racism, of structural racism [and of] systemic racism in this country," said Miller-Idriss.

She said that many young people observe the racial disparities in American society and will seek out answers to them. The document believed to be linked to the suspect pulls data from dubious online sources to support spurious claims of biological racism and crime rates.

"They may not be talking about it from good academic sources or good learning sources," Miller-Idriss said, "but they're going to be hearing about it in dark online spaces instead."
So now npr is a reliable source😞
I never heard of replacement theory until the fall shooting but now it’s mainstream. People are nuts!
 
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LionDeNittany

Well-Known Member
May 29, 2001
44,681
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DFW, TX
This is the first I have heard of this. So my question is this. Who is actually spreading this conspiracy theory?.....hmm.

Exactly.

According to @2lion70 this board is full of 'Trumpers'.

Where are all the RT posts from the last 6 months?

This is a pretty standard left tactic.
Group those who want a secure border with a murderer/racist.

you've seen their posts. Secure border won't stop drugs. Won't help crime. It was always racist but now it's also a crazy conspiracy theory.

LdN
 
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m.knox

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 20, 2003
103,093
56,004
1
Now about 1 in 3 US citizens believe in this racist nonsense led by Fox News and the Reoub party;

A 180-page online screed attributed to the white man accused of killing 10 people at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on Saturday has brought a once-fringe white extremist conspiracy theory into the spotlight. But the underpinnings of the "great replacement" conspiracy theory, which has been iterated on over time to appeal to wider audiences, has penetrated a much more mainstream portion of American society. A recent poll, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that one in three American adults now believes in a version of replacement theory.

The speed with which this false narrative has tipped into American discourse since a French ethnonationalist first coined the term roughly a decade ago has stunned even extremism experts who have tracked the spread of hate-filled ideologies. They cite the failure of major social media platforms to effectively moderate such content, the role of Fox News hosts in amplifying these ideas, and the uptake of the conspiracy's language by some elected Republican officials.

Demographic change​

Between 2010 and 2020, the percentage of Americans who identified as "white only" declined by more than 10 percent, from 72 to 62 percent. During that same decade, several Western European countries saw record influxes of migrants from Muslim nations. It is against the backdrop of this demographic change that replacement rhetoric has accelerated in recent years.

Sponsor Message


"In the U.S., [it's] often called 'white genocide.' In Europe, [it's] called 'Eurabia,' " said Cynthia Miller-Idriss, professor and director of the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at American University.

The baseless theories claim that these population shifts are orchestrated by elite power holders. In the U.S., Miller-Idriss said white nationalists ascribe the plot to Jews who they believe are bringing in immigrants and promoting interracial marriage to suppress whites. In Europe, the false narrative blames elite politicians for a growing Muslim population. Miller-Idriss said the coining of the term "great replacement" in France marked a key moment in the growth of these beliefs.

"It has unified and really spread [the conspiracies] online in memes and videos and in a lot of propaganda," she said. "It capitalized on a moment when you're not just reading written propaganda or sharing it in a newsletter or in a small group in a backwoods militia. But it's circulating in these dark online spaces where this [alleged] Buffalo shooter writes he was exposed and radicalized."

From there, the conspiracy theories migrated toward progressively less fringe conservative media platforms, said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

"We have literally watched as ideas that originate on white supremacist message boards, or like the dark web – the places that are very difficult to get to – move," said Greenblatt. "They literally jump to [internet message boards like] 4chan and 8chan, which are much more accessible, [then] they jump to web sites like The Daily Caller or Breitbart, and then they jump to Tucker Carlson's talking points or Laura Ingraham's talking points, or other AM radio DJs' talking points. And then you have theoretically mainstream Republican politicians repeating some of this stuff."

Carlson and Ingraham are Fox News hosts.

"Sanitizing" the message​

Although the roots of the "great replacement" are firmly planted in the organized white supremacist movement, a version of the baseless conspiracy has spread among a wider swath of Americans with some minor tweaking of language. Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, said that Carlson has framed the issue around voter replacement.

"What he says is that the Democrats are importing immigrants and that they are replacing Americans," said Gertz. "But no one should really be confused by what he is trying to do. The specific cases that he's talking about are Central American immigrants, they are immigrants from Africa, they are immigrants from the Middle East."


Tucker Carlson speaks at a convention in Esztergom, Hungary on August 7, 2021.
Janos Kummer/Getty Images
Greenblatt, whose organization has repeatedly called on Fox News to fire Carlson, said figures such as Carlson have sought language that might be palatable to more Americans. In moving away from white nationalist terms like "white genocide" and "Jewish cabal," they have repackaged the conspiracy as one driven by political partisanship.

"It has been an intentional effort ... to take these ideas and to try to sanitize them ... so they could bring their ideas into the mainstream," said Greenblatt.

Fox News declined to comment in response to questions from NPR about the role that critics say Carlson and Ingraham have played in stoking fears over replacement.

Greenblatt, Gertz and Miller-Idriss say claims of an orchestrated "immigrant invasion" have gained legitimacy through the endorsement of some elected Republicans, most notably former President Donald Trump. But they note that the messaging has continued after Trump left office.

"Elise Stefanik has pushed the same thing," said Gertz, referring to the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives. "This is moving steadily into mainstream Republican politics."

How to fight a pervasive conspiracy theory?​

The document believed to have been written by the suspected gunman in the Buffalo attack does not ascribe his radicalization to Fox News or rhetoric of politicians. Rather, he describes it as taking place on the same internet chat boards that were early to adopt the language of the racist "great replacement" conspiracy theory, such as 4chan.

"[Those are] still, I think, the spaces and places we should be most worried about," said Miller-Idriss.

Still, Miller-Idriss and other extremism experts say the mainstreaming of "replacement" theory remains alarming. Greenblatt said it isn't enough to condemn the violence, because speech that dehumanizes other people – whether Blacks, immigrants or Jews – can inspire violence.

"What I would suggest is that people in positions of authority, who have platforms, should use those platforms responsibly and call out this kind of ugliness and cease the incitement immediately because it's too dangerous to do otherwise," he said.

In the wake of the tragedy, much attention is focusing on whether stricter gun laws might have prevented it, the role of social media, whether the suspected gunman had a history of mental health problems, and whether law enforcement authorities missed early red flags.

"But all of that really doesn't make a difference if [individuals] in the end don't have a basic understanding of the legacy of racism, of structural racism [and of] systemic racism in this country," said Miller-Idriss.

She said that many young people observe the racial disparities in American society and will seek out answers to them. The document believed to be linked to the suspect pulls data from dubious online sources to support spurious claims of biological racism and crime rates.

"They may not be talking about it from good academic sources or good learning sources," Miller-Idriss said, "but they're going to be hearing about it in dark online spaces instead."

I never heard of it until a couple days ago. Obviously, it is nonsense.

We all know tuck and tape is THE national priority right now. Even made Jen Sack-ee cry.
 

BoulderFish

Well-Known Member
Oct 31, 2016
10,280
7,347
1
Now about 1 in 3 US citizens believe in this racist nonsense led by Fox News and the Reoub party;

A 180-page online screed attributed to the white man accused of killing 10 people at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on Saturday has brought a once-fringe white extremist conspiracy theory into the spotlight. But the underpinnings of the "great replacement" conspiracy theory, which has been iterated on over time to appeal to wider audiences, has penetrated a much more mainstream portion of American society. A recent poll, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that one in three American adults now believes in a version of replacement theory.

The speed with which this false narrative has tipped into American discourse since a French ethnonationalist first coined the term roughly a decade ago has stunned even extremism experts who have tracked the spread of hate-filled ideologies. They cite the failure of major social media platforms to effectively moderate such content, the role of Fox News hosts in amplifying these ideas, and the uptake of the conspiracy's language by some elected Republican officials.

Demographic change​

Between 2010 and 2020, the percentage of Americans who identified as "white only" declined by more than 10 percent, from 72 to 62 percent. During that same decade, several Western European countries saw record influxes of migrants from Muslim nations. It is against the backdrop of this demographic change that replacement rhetoric has accelerated in recent years.

Sponsor Message


"In the U.S., [it's] often called 'white genocide.' In Europe, [it's] called 'Eurabia,' " said Cynthia Miller-Idriss, professor and director of the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at American University.

The baseless theories claim that these population shifts are orchestrated by elite power holders. In the U.S., Miller-Idriss said white nationalists ascribe the plot to Jews who they believe are bringing in immigrants and promoting interracial marriage to suppress whites. In Europe, the false narrative blames elite politicians for a growing Muslim population. Miller-Idriss said the coining of the term "great replacement" in France marked a key moment in the growth of these beliefs.

"It has unified and really spread [the conspiracies] online in memes and videos and in a lot of propaganda," she said. "It capitalized on a moment when you're not just reading written propaganda or sharing it in a newsletter or in a small group in a backwoods militia. But it's circulating in these dark online spaces where this [alleged] Buffalo shooter writes he was exposed and radicalized."

From there, the conspiracy theories migrated toward progressively less fringe conservative media platforms, said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

"We have literally watched as ideas that originate on white supremacist message boards, or like the dark web – the places that are very difficult to get to – move," said Greenblatt. "They literally jump to [internet message boards like] 4chan and 8chan, which are much more accessible, [then] they jump to web sites like The Daily Caller or Breitbart, and then they jump to Tucker Carlson's talking points or Laura Ingraham's talking points, or other AM radio DJs' talking points. And then you have theoretically mainstream Republican politicians repeating some of this stuff."

Carlson and Ingraham are Fox News hosts.

"Sanitizing" the message​

Although the roots of the "great replacement" are firmly planted in the organized white supremacist movement, a version of the baseless conspiracy has spread among a wider swath of Americans with some minor tweaking of language. Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, said that Carlson has framed the issue around voter replacement.

"What he says is that the Democrats are importing immigrants and that they are replacing Americans," said Gertz. "But no one should really be confused by what he is trying to do. The specific cases that he's talking about are Central American immigrants, they are immigrants from Africa, they are immigrants from the Middle East."


Tucker Carlson speaks at a convention in Esztergom, Hungary on August 7, 2021.
Janos Kummer/Getty Images
Greenblatt, whose organization has repeatedly called on Fox News to fire Carlson, said figures such as Carlson have sought language that might be palatable to more Americans. In moving away from white nationalist terms like "white genocide" and "Jewish cabal," they have repackaged the conspiracy as one driven by political partisanship.

"It has been an intentional effort ... to take these ideas and to try to sanitize them ... so they could bring their ideas into the mainstream," said Greenblatt.

Fox News declined to comment in response to questions from NPR about the role that critics say Carlson and Ingraham have played in stoking fears over replacement.

Greenblatt, Gertz and Miller-Idriss say claims of an orchestrated "immigrant invasion" have gained legitimacy through the endorsement of some elected Republicans, most notably former President Donald Trump. But they note that the messaging has continued after Trump left office.

"Elise Stefanik has pushed the same thing," said Gertz, referring to the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives. "This is moving steadily into mainstream Republican politics."

How to fight a pervasive conspiracy theory?​

The document believed to have been written by the suspected gunman in the Buffalo attack does not ascribe his radicalization to Fox News or rhetoric of politicians. Rather, he describes it as taking place on the same internet chat boards that were early to adopt the language of the racist "great replacement" conspiracy theory, such as 4chan.

"[Those are] still, I think, the spaces and places we should be most worried about," said Miller-Idriss.

Still, Miller-Idriss and other extremism experts say the mainstreaming of "replacement" theory remains alarming. Greenblatt said it isn't enough to condemn the violence, because speech that dehumanizes other people – whether Blacks, immigrants or Jews – can inspire violence.

"What I would suggest is that people in positions of authority, who have platforms, should use those platforms responsibly and call out this kind of ugliness and cease the incitement immediately because it's too dangerous to do otherwise," he said.

In the wake of the tragedy, much attention is focusing on whether stricter gun laws might have prevented it, the role of social media, whether the suspected gunman had a history of mental health problems, and whether law enforcement authorities missed early red flags.

"But all of that really doesn't make a difference if [individuals] in the end don't have a basic understanding of the legacy of racism, of structural racism [and of] systemic racism in this country," said Miller-Idriss.

She said that many young people observe the racial disparities in American society and will seek out answers to them. The document believed to be linked to the suspect pulls data from dubious online sources to support spurious claims of biological racism and crime rates.

"They may not be talking about it from good academic sources or good learning sources," Miller-Idriss said, "but they're going to be hearing about it in dark online spaces instead."

It's really quite frightening that you can't see how that article (the author of that article) is manipulating you.
 
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WPTLION

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Jan 7, 2002
2,751
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Now about 1 in 3 US citizens believe in this racist nonsense led by Fox News and the Reoub party;

A 180-page online screed attributed to the white man accused of killing 10 people at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on Saturday has brought a once-fringe white extremist conspiracy theory into the spotlight. But the underpinnings of the "great replacement" conspiracy theory, which has been iterated on over time to appeal to wider audiences, has penetrated a much more mainstream portion of American society. A recent poll, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that one in three American adults now believes in a version of replacement theory.

The speed with which this false narrative has tipped into American discourse since a French ethnonationalist first coined the term roughly a decade ago has stunned even extremism experts who have tracked the spread of hate-filled ideologies. They cite the failure of major social media platforms to effectively moderate such content, the role of Fox News hosts in amplifying these ideas, and the uptake of the conspiracy's language by some elected Republican officials.

Demographic change​

Between 2010 and 2020, the percentage of Americans who identified as "white only" declined by more than 10 percent, from 72 to 62 percent. During that same decade, several Western European countries saw record influxes of migrants from Muslim nations. It is against the backdrop of this demographic change that replacement rhetoric has accelerated in recent years.

Sponsor Message


"In the U.S., [it's] often called 'white genocide.' In Europe, [it's] called 'Eurabia,' " said Cynthia Miller-Idriss, professor and director of the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at American University.

The baseless theories claim that these population shifts are orchestrated by elite power holders. In the U.S., Miller-Idriss said white nationalists ascribe the plot to Jews who they believe are bringing in immigrants and promoting interracial marriage to suppress whites. In Europe, the false narrative blames elite politicians for a growing Muslim population. Miller-Idriss said the coining of the term "great replacement" in France marked a key moment in the growth of these beliefs.

"It has unified and really spread [the conspiracies] online in memes and videos and in a lot of propaganda," she said. "It capitalized on a moment when you're not just reading written propaganda or sharing it in a newsletter or in a small group in a backwoods militia. But it's circulating in these dark online spaces where this [alleged] Buffalo shooter writes he was exposed and radicalized."

From there, the conspiracy theories migrated toward progressively less fringe conservative media platforms, said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

"We have literally watched as ideas that originate on white supremacist message boards, or like the dark web – the places that are very difficult to get to – move," said Greenblatt. "They literally jump to [internet message boards like] 4chan and 8chan, which are much more accessible, [then] they jump to web sites like The Daily Caller or Breitbart, and then they jump to Tucker Carlson's talking points or Laura Ingraham's talking points, or other AM radio DJs' talking points. And then you have theoretically mainstream Republican politicians repeating some of this stuff."

Carlson and Ingraham are Fox News hosts.

"Sanitizing" the message​

Although the roots of the "great replacement" are firmly planted in the organized white supremacist movement, a version of the baseless conspiracy has spread among a wider swath of Americans with some minor tweaking of language. Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, said that Carlson has framed the issue around voter replacement.

"What he says is that the Democrats are importing immigrants and that they are replacing Americans," said Gertz. "But no one should really be confused by what he is trying to do. The specific cases that he's talking about are Central American immigrants, they are immigrants from Africa, they are immigrants from the Middle East."


Tucker Carlson speaks at a convention in Esztergom, Hungary on August 7, 2021.
Janos Kummer/Getty Images
Greenblatt, whose organization has repeatedly called on Fox News to fire Carlson, said figures such as Carlson have sought language that might be palatable to more Americans. In moving away from white nationalist terms like "white genocide" and "Jewish cabal," they have repackaged the conspiracy as one driven by political partisanship.

"It has been an intentional effort ... to take these ideas and to try to sanitize them ... so they could bring their ideas into the mainstream," said Greenblatt.

Fox News declined to comment in response to questions from NPR about the role that critics say Carlson and Ingraham have played in stoking fears over replacement.

Greenblatt, Gertz and Miller-Idriss say claims of an orchestrated "immigrant invasion" have gained legitimacy through the endorsement of some elected Republicans, most notably former President Donald Trump. But they note that the messaging has continued after Trump left office.

"Elise Stefanik has pushed the same thing," said Gertz, referring to the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives. "This is moving steadily into mainstream Republican politics."

How to fight a pervasive conspiracy theory?​

The document believed to have been written by the suspected gunman in the Buffalo attack does not ascribe his radicalization to Fox News or rhetoric of politicians. Rather, he describes it as taking place on the same internet chat boards that were early to adopt the language of the racist "great replacement" conspiracy theory, such as 4chan.

"[Those are] still, I think, the spaces and places we should be most worried about," said Miller-Idriss.

Still, Miller-Idriss and other extremism experts say the mainstreaming of "replacement" theory remains alarming. Greenblatt said it isn't enough to condemn the violence, because speech that dehumanizes other people – whether Blacks, immigrants or Jews – can inspire violence.

"What I would suggest is that people in positions of authority, who have platforms, should use those platforms responsibly and call out this kind of ugliness and cease the incitement immediately because it's too dangerous to do otherwise," he said.

In the wake of the tragedy, much attention is focusing on whether stricter gun laws might have prevented it, the role of social media, whether the suspected gunman had a history of mental health problems, and whether law enforcement authorities missed early red flags.

"But all of that really doesn't make a difference if [individuals] in the end don't have a basic understanding of the legacy of racism, of structural racism [and of] systemic racism in this country," said Miller-Idriss.

She said that many young people observe the racial disparities in American society and will seek out answers to them. The document believed to be linked to the suspect pulls data from dubious online sources to support spurious claims of biological racism and crime rates.

"They may not be talking about it from good academic sources or good learning sources," Miller-Idriss said, "but they're going to be hearing about it in dark online spaces instead."
Well---this guy started it. Oh look he was a democrat. Funny how it's always the dems accusing the reps of doing what they are actually doing.
 
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WPTLION

Well-Known Member
Jan 7, 2002
2,751
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Exactly.

According to @2lion70 this board is full of 'Trumpers'.

Where are all the RT posts from the last 6 months?

This is a pretty standard left tactic.
Group those who want a secure border with a murderer/racist.

you've seen their posts. Secure border won't stop drugs. Won't help crime. It was always racist but now it's also a crazy conspiracy theory.

LdN
LdN aren't you aware of our special board here that we talk about this stuff in secret?
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
106,451
54,520
1
Now about 1 in 3 US citizens believe in this racist nonsense led by Fox News and the Reoub party;

A 180-page online screed attributed to the white man accused of killing 10 people at a Tops Friendly Market in Buffalo on Saturday has brought a once-fringe white extremist conspiracy theory into the spotlight. But the underpinnings of the "great replacement" conspiracy theory, which has been iterated on over time to appeal to wider audiences, has penetrated a much more mainstream portion of American society. A recent poll, conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, found that one in three American adults now believes in a version of replacement theory.

The speed with which this false narrative has tipped into American discourse since a French ethnonationalist first coined the term roughly a decade ago has stunned even extremism experts who have tracked the spread of hate-filled ideologies. They cite the failure of major social media platforms to effectively moderate such content, the role of Fox News hosts in amplifying these ideas, and the uptake of the conspiracy's language by some elected Republican officials.

Demographic change​

Between 2010 and 2020, the percentage of Americans who identified as "white only" declined by more than 10 percent, from 72 to 62 percent. During that same decade, several Western European countries saw record influxes of migrants from Muslim nations. It is against the backdrop of this demographic change that replacement rhetoric has accelerated in recent years.

Sponsor Message


"In the U.S., [it's] often called 'white genocide.' In Europe, [it's] called 'Eurabia,' " said Cynthia Miller-Idriss, professor and director of the Polarization and Extremism Research and Innovation Lab at American University.

The baseless theories claim that these population shifts are orchestrated by elite power holders. In the U.S., Miller-Idriss said white nationalists ascribe the plot to Jews who they believe are bringing in immigrants and promoting interracial marriage to suppress whites. In Europe, the false narrative blames elite politicians for a growing Muslim population. Miller-Idriss said the coining of the term "great replacement" in France marked a key moment in the growth of these beliefs.

"It has unified and really spread [the conspiracies] online in memes and videos and in a lot of propaganda," she said. "It capitalized on a moment when you're not just reading written propaganda or sharing it in a newsletter or in a small group in a backwoods militia. But it's circulating in these dark online spaces where this [alleged] Buffalo shooter writes he was exposed and radicalized."

From there, the conspiracy theories migrated toward progressively less fringe conservative media platforms, said Jonathan Greenblatt, CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League.

"We have literally watched as ideas that originate on white supremacist message boards, or like the dark web – the places that are very difficult to get to – move," said Greenblatt. "They literally jump to [internet message boards like] 4chan and 8chan, which are much more accessible, [then] they jump to web sites like The Daily Caller or Breitbart, and then they jump to Tucker Carlson's talking points or Laura Ingraham's talking points, or other AM radio DJs' talking points. And then you have theoretically mainstream Republican politicians repeating some of this stuff."

Carlson and Ingraham are Fox News hosts.

"Sanitizing" the message​

Although the roots of the "great replacement" are firmly planted in the organized white supremacist movement, a version of the baseless conspiracy has spread among a wider swath of Americans with some minor tweaking of language. Matthew Gertz, a senior fellow at Media Matters for America, said that Carlson has framed the issue around voter replacement.

"What he says is that the Democrats are importing immigrants and that they are replacing Americans," said Gertz. "But no one should really be confused by what he is trying to do. The specific cases that he's talking about are Central American immigrants, they are immigrants from Africa, they are immigrants from the Middle East."


Tucker Carlson speaks at a convention in Esztergom, Hungary on August 7, 2021.
Janos Kummer/Getty Images
Greenblatt, whose organization has repeatedly called on Fox News to fire Carlson, said figures such as Carlson have sought language that might be palatable to more Americans. In moving away from white nationalist terms like "white genocide" and "Jewish cabal," they have repackaged the conspiracy as one driven by political partisanship.

"It has been an intentional effort ... to take these ideas and to try to sanitize them ... so they could bring their ideas into the mainstream," said Greenblatt.

Fox News declined to comment in response to questions from NPR about the role that critics say Carlson and Ingraham have played in stoking fears over replacement.

Greenblatt, Gertz and Miller-Idriss say claims of an orchestrated "immigrant invasion" have gained legitimacy through the endorsement of some elected Republicans, most notably former President Donald Trump. But they note that the messaging has continued after Trump left office.

"Elise Stefanik has pushed the same thing," said Gertz, referring to the third-highest ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives. "This is moving steadily into mainstream Republican politics."

How to fight a pervasive conspiracy theory?​

The document believed to have been written by the suspected gunman in the Buffalo attack does not ascribe his radicalization to Fox News or rhetoric of politicians. Rather, he describes it as taking place on the same internet chat boards that were early to adopt the language of the racist "great replacement" conspiracy theory, such as 4chan.

"[Those are] still, I think, the spaces and places we should be most worried about," said Miller-Idriss.

Still, Miller-Idriss and other extremism experts say the mainstreaming of "replacement" theory remains alarming. Greenblatt said it isn't enough to condemn the violence, because speech that dehumanizes other people – whether Blacks, immigrants or Jews – can inspire violence.

"What I would suggest is that people in positions of authority, who have platforms, should use those platforms responsibly and call out this kind of ugliness and cease the incitement immediately because it's too dangerous to do otherwise," he said.

In the wake of the tragedy, much attention is focusing on whether stricter gun laws might have prevented it, the role of social media, whether the suspected gunman had a history of mental health problems, and whether law enforcement authorities missed early red flags.

"But all of that really doesn't make a difference if [individuals] in the end don't have a basic understanding of the legacy of racism, of structural racism [and of] systemic racism in this country," said Miller-Idriss.

She said that many young people observe the racial disparities in American society and will seek out answers to them. The document believed to be linked to the suspect pulls data from dubious online sources to support spurious claims of biological racism and crime rates.

"They may not be talking about it from good academic sources or good learning sources," Miller-Idriss said, "but they're going to be hearing about it in dark online spaces instead."
I am old enough to remember when the Black guy was killing white people in NY or Wisconsin that that left on this board was telling us the media would cover it equally.
 

BoulderFish

Well-Known Member
Oct 31, 2016
10,280
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From barely mentioned to mainstream in 3 days. That's a new libtard record, 2Lyin.

You see what they did there, right?

This article was straight-up, 100% propaganda.

They started with this "great replacement theory" (or whatever) that is presumably, legitimately a conspiracy theory - A pretty gross one at that.

Then, they took a conservative talking point - one that may or may not be true, but is based on some undeniable truths, and is one that liberals have trouble denying, but they really don't want people to believe - and said, "Hey look! This thing that Rs are telling you, it's really just that really ugly conspiracy theory! OMG look at Rs mainstreaming that ugly conspiracy theory!"

But of course the R talking point, regardless of whether you believe it or not, absolutely is not the same thing - frankly, it's not even close - as this "great replacement theory."

The author assumes most people will be able to see though that, so they throw in there that it's really the same thing, but "sanitized."

That gives the uncritical reader the freedom to believe, if they would like, what they can plainly see isn't true.

Then throw in the use of the word "baseless" with conspiracy. It isn't enough to call it a "conspiracy." It's a "baseless conspiracy." That makes it a matter of fact that this isn't just a conspiracy theory - It's so roll-your-eyes ridiculous that only the lowest of low IQs could possibly buy it. And "since you're not one of those lowest of the low IQs, reader of the article (2lion70), you don't even have to bother with looking at this any more closely."

Fascinating.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
8,190
7,763
1
To me, the real "Replacement Theory" is associated with the influx of hispanics across the southern border. If you lived most of your life in Texas you would have seen your area change from English/white to Hispanic/brown.

Enter the Democratic Party, who has decided to use weakness at the border to their advantage. If you are the opposing party (Republican) you see their border policy as support for a form of voter "replacement."

All of this other stuff that might be associated with the Buffalo shooter is nonsense, but it would not surprise us to see the Democratic Party attempt to link the two under one "Replacement Theory" umbrella, to provide cover for what they are doing at the border.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
106,451
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1
You see what they did there, right?

This article was straight-up, 100% propaganda.

They started with this "great replacement theory" (or whatever) that is presumably, legitimately a conspiracy theory - A pretty gross one at that.

Then, they took a conservative talking point - one that may or may not be true, but is based on some undeniable truths, and is one that liberals have trouble denying, but they really don't want people to believe - and said, "Hey look! This thing that Rs are telling you, it's really just that really ugly conspiracy theory! OMG look at Rs mainstreaming that ugly conspiracy theory!"

But of course the R talking point, regardless of whether you believe it or not, absolutely is not the same thing - frankly, it's not even close - as this "great replacement theory."

The author assumes most people will be able to see though that, so they throw in there that it's really the same thing, but "sanitized."

That gives the uncritical reader the freedom to believe, if they would like, what they can plainly see isn't true.

Then throw in the use of the word "baseless" with conspiracy. It isn't enough to call it a "conspiracy." It's a "baseless conspiracy." That makes it a matter of fact that this isn't just a conspiracy theory - It's so roll-your-eyes ridiculous that only the lowest of low IQs could possibly buy it. And "since you're not one of those lowest of the low IQs, reader of the article (2lion70), you don't even have to bother with looking at this any more closely."

Fascinating.
..and, understand, that it is designed to divide races for political gain. The very division that they are pretending to eschew in the article, they are fomenting with this kind of broad brush talk. evil personified.
 

2lion70

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2004
15,655
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So now npr is a reliable source😞
I never heard of replacement theory until the fall shooting but now it’s mainstream. People are nuts!
Charlottesville and the shooting in El Paso, Tree of Life.....
When you watch Fox you get a daily dose of RT.
 

2lion70

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2004
15,655
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1
To me, the real "Replacement Theory" is associated with the influx of hispanics across the southern border. If you lived most of your life in Texas you would have seen your area change from English/white to Hispanic/brown.

Enter the Democratic Party, who has decided to use weakness at the border to their advantage. If you are the opposing party (Republican) you see their border policy as support for a form of voter "replacement."

All of this other stuff that might be associated with the Buffalo shooter is nonsense, but it would not surprise us to see the Democratic Party attempt to link the two under one "Replacement Theory" umbrella, to provide cover for what they are doing at the border.
You have been brainwashed by Fox and the Repubs. A very sad situation. Once again saying lies over and over will convince the weak-minded of any conspiracy.
I'm sure you are happy in your ignorance.
 
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Treelion66

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Nov 14, 2018
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Exactly. Someone prove to me that this isn't the motive.

We have every reason to distrust everything coming out of the mouth of the Left. They have a record of lying.
Like the right doesn’t? Seriously… its just you’re too dumb and indoctrinated to understand.
 
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2lion70

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2004
15,655
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You see what they did there, right?

This article was straight-up, 100% propaganda.

They started with this "great replacement theory" (or whatever) that is presumably, legitimately a conspiracy theory - A pretty gross one at that.

Then, they took a conservative talking point - one that may or may not be true, but is based on some undeniable truths, and is one that liberals have trouble denying, but they really don't want people to believe - and said, "Hey look! This thing that Rs are telling you, it's really just that really ugly conspiracy theory! OMG look at Rs mainstreaming that ugly conspiracy theory!"

But of course the R talking point, regardless of whether you believe it or not, absolutely is not the same thing - frankly, it's not even close - as this "great replacement theory."

The author assumes most people will be able to see though that, so they throw in there that it's really the same thing, but "sanitized."

That gives the uncritical reader the freedom to believe, if they would like, what they can plainly see isn't true.

Then throw in the use of the word "baseless" with conspiracy. It isn't enough to call it a "conspiracy." It's a "baseless conspiracy." That makes it a matter of fact that this isn't just a conspiracy theory - It's so roll-your-eyes ridiculous that only the lowest of low IQs could possibly buy it. And "since you're not one of those lowest of the low IQs, reader of the article (2lion70), you don't even have to bother with looking at this any more closely."

Fascinating.
The article presented very factual information. You have been brainwashed to think only what you see/hear on Fox and other right wing conspiracy outlets.
RT was formed in France to explain how all the Arab immigrants were sent by a cabal of no good people like the Jews. The idea espoused imply states the 'others' are going to overwhelm the whites. Does this sound like a daily dose of Fox?
 

Lion8286

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
15,015
21,682
1
Charlottesville and the shooting in El Paso, Tree of Life.....
When you watch Fox you get a daily dose of RT.

It appears libtards like 2Lyin and Paoli watch much more Fox News than most conservatives do.
 

2lion70

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2004
15,655
5,077
1
It appears libtards like 2Lyin and Paoli watch much more Fox News than most conservatives do.
I watch enough Fox to see what their bias is on topics. I can then see how totally slanted they are - they are trying to destroy our country.
The majority of people who accept RT as being true are Foxers.
 

Lion8286

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
15,015
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I watch enough Fox to see what their bias is on topics. I can then see how totally slanted they are - they are trying to destroy our country.
The majority of people who accept RT as being true are Foxers.

Interesting how you never mentioned "Replacement Theory" before today and now, all of a sudden, it's mainstream.

Funny how often these things happen with the Dims.
 

WPTLION

Well-Known Member
Jan 7, 2002
2,751
2,337
1
The article presented very factual information. You have been brainwashed to think only what you see/hear on Fox and other right wing conspiracy outlets.
RT was formed in France to explain how all the Arab immigrants were sent by a cabal of no good people like the Jews. The idea espoused imply states the 'others' are going to overwhelm the whites. Does this sound like a daily dose of Fox?
No it doesn't MORON---only a racist Democrat even thinks that. Youreally are a ****TARD
 

WPTLION

Well-Known Member
Jan 7, 2002
2,751
2,337
1
I watch enough Fox to see what their bias is on topics. I can then see how totally slanted they are - they are trying to destroy our country.
The majority of people who accept RT as being true are Foxers.
Ok ASSHOLE---please explain what is on fox that is trying to destroy our country.

I'll give you a hint---it's anytime they cover Biden!
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
8,190
7,763
1
I watch enough Fox to see what their bias is on topics. I can then see how totally slanted they are - they are trying to destroy our country.
The majority of people who accept RT as being true are Foxers.

You back up your opinions with ...... nothing.

Meanwhile, here is a fact: Millions are crossing our southern border, and your political party is doing nothing to stop it. In fact they are aiding in the illegal distribution of those people throughout the country.

How about if you start posting some facts.
 

2lion70

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2004
15,655
5,077
1

The article is long, no pictures, but gives a real concise history of RT. The last section even details how RT is now mainstream in the Repub party.

Fox spreads distrust of all 'mainstream media' that is often echoed here and on other outlets. They slant everything to make our government look bad - they even say we can't trust our government and it's agencies.
 

Lion8286

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
15,015
21,682
1
The article is long, no pictures, but gives a real concise history of RT. The last section even details how RT is now mainstream in the Repub party.

Mainstream! lol.

I have some swampland in Florida you might be interested in, 2Lyin.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

Well-Known Member
Jul 19, 2010
8,190
7,763
1

The article is long, no pictures, but gives a real concise history of RT. The last section even details how RT is now mainstream in the Repub party.

Fox spreads distrust of all 'mainstream media' that is often echoed here and on other outlets. They slant everything to make our government look bad - they even say we can't trust our government and it's agencies.

So this is the logic:
  1. There are people who espouse RT (that has no clear definition to match anything said by prominent Republicans).
  2. Some right wing radicals espouse RT (perhaps with a broad paint brush that could be aligned with "white supremacy").
  3. The Republican Party is right wing.
  4. Leftwing conclusion: RT is now "mainstream" in the Republican Party. (Never mind that RT has no definition and depends on the person using the term.)
And you wonder why conservatives on this board have problems with arguments put forth by leftists here. Leftists have some basic problems with logic, or they don't care and would rather lie and deceive for their cause.
 

2lion70

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Gold Member
Jul 1, 2004
15,655
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Replacement theory has become mainstream among Republicans​

Meanwhile, the rhetoric of replacement theory has become increasingly prominent among some Republicans. Party members have espoused tenets of replacement theory, and some have supported it by name, to help bolster anti-immigration sentiments and policies.

Throughout his presidency, Donald Trump repeatedly employed the arguments and tropes that form the basis of replacement theory — that white people were facing “white genocide” as a result of an “invasion” from foreigners. “We don’t want what is happening with immigration in Europe to happen with us!” Trump tweeted in 2018. The former president’s latest presidential campaign posted more than 2,000 ads that featured the word “invasion,” according to a New York Times analysis.

Following Trump’s fearmongering that a migrant caravan of Central Americans was on its way to the US’s southern border, other lawmakers adopted the language. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) has repeatedly tweeted about an invasion that lawmakers need to take action against.

Former Iowa Rep. Steve King, who was in Congress from 2003 to 2021, constantly voiced fears about replacement. In 2017 he tweeted, “We can’t restore our civilization with someone else’s babies,” once retweeted a Nazi sympathizer’s fears about migration, and celebrated Hungary’s authoritarian leader Viktor Orbán for denouncing “mixing cultures.”

Fox News’ Tucker Carlson has perhaps become the foremost champion of replacement theory on the right. In about 400 episodes of his show since 2016, according to a New York Times analysis, he shared ideas about replacement. He even used the idea to defend the people who carried out the January 6, 2021 insurrection at the US Capitol. “In political terms, this policy is called the great replacement, the replacement of legacy Americans with more obedient people from faraway countries,” Carlson said on his program last year in response to the Haitian migrants who arrived at the border.

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) defended Carlson’s interpretation of replacement theory on Twitter, saying the news host was “correct” in his analysis of “what is happening to America.”

There’s some evidence that these ideas are resonating with Americans. A large poll conducted by the Associated Press and NORC in late 2021 found that about one in three US adults thinks that there is a plot underway to replace US-born Americans with immigrants. Republicans were more likely than Democrats to believe that native-born Americans are losing economic, political, and cultural influence because of immigration.

Replacement theory has a long history, but no longer lies dormant — if it ever did — in the past, or in the black holes of the internet. The conspiracy allows white supremacist violence to remain “the most persistent and lethal threat” in America, as long as the country fails to root it out.
 

Hotshoe

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Gold Member
Feb 15, 2012
24,939
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Lmao. Your party is crashing. Look in the mirror. How's your gas prices? Funny, you never have the balls to respond. I wonder why.
 
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KnightWhoSaysNit

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Jul 19, 2010
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So you’re telling me the right doesn’t lie? Boy, you really are dumb and indoctrinated. Do you want facts or “alternative facts”? 😂

I want facts. Not your opinion when you are making a claim about me.

Did I make the claim that the "right" doesn't lie? Well that is a loaded sentence. For one, I never made that claim, yet you counter with it. That's called a "straw man."

Are there right-wingers who lie? Of course.

But the worst lies -- THE RELEVANT LIES -- are coming out of the Left.

For example, our biggest problem right now is inflation. Yet the Administration and Congress blame corporations for inflation, not their money printing, spending, and regulatory policies. If corporations were the cause of inflation, why then was there little inflation prior to the Dems taking office? Are corporations raising prices as a conspiracy against Democrats?

Second major lie: The border is under control (while hundreds of thousands per month cross).

Third major lie: Country suffers from "systemic racism." Whites are privileged and blacks are oppressed.

Fourth major lie: White Supremacy is our biggest domestic security concern.

Edit: One more lie that I just saw reported on TV: Biden says that "the GOP wants to raise taxes and lower income." Ironically, that is exactly the result of Biden's inflation, a problem for which he not only offers no solution, but who makes it worse via policies since taking office.

Should I go on? Tell us how "right wing" lies are impacting Americans today. Nothing comes close in comparison. You won't be able to do it. You'll just offer a vague opinion.
 
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KnightWhoSaysNit

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Replacement theory has become mainstream among Republicans​

Meanwhile, the rhetoric of replacement theory has become increasingly prominent among some Republicans. Party members have espoused tenets of replacement theory, and some have supported it by name, to help bolster anti-immigration sentiments and policies.

Throughout his presidency, Donald Trump repeatedly employed the arguments and tropes that form the basis of replacement theory — that white people were facing “white genocide” as a result of an “invasion” from foreigners. “We don’t want what is happening with immigration in Europe to happen with us!” Trump tweeted in 2018. The former president’s latest presidential campaign posted more than 2,000 ads that featured the word “invasion,” according to a New York Times analysis.

Following Trump’s fearmongering that a migrant caravan of Central Americans was on its way to the US’s southern border, other lawmakers adopted the language. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) has repeatedly tweeted about an invasion that lawmakers need to take action against.

Former Iowa Rep. Steve King, who was in Congress from 2003 to 2021, constantly voiced fears about replacement. In 2017 he tweeted, “We can’t restore our civilization with someone else’s babies,” once retweeted a Nazi sympathizer’s fears about migration, and celebrated Hungary’s authoritarian leader Viktor Orbán for denouncing “mixing cultures.”

Fox News’ Tucker Carlson has perhaps become the foremost champion of replacement theory on the right. In about 400 episodes of his show since 2016, according to a New York Times analysis, he shared ideas about replacement. He even used the idea to defend the people who carried out the January 6, 2021 insurrection at the US Capitol. “In political terms, this policy is called the great replacement, the replacement of legacy Americans with more obedient people from faraway countries,” Carlson said on his program last year in response to the Haitian migrants who arrived at the border.

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) defended Carlson’s interpretation of replacement theory on Twitter, saying the news host was “correct” in his analysis of “what is happening to America.”

There’s some evidence that these ideas are resonating with Americans. A large poll conducted by the Associated Press and NORC in late 2021 found that about one in three US adults thinks that there is a plot underway to replace US-born Americans with immigrants. Republicans were more likely than Democrats to believe that native-born Americans are losing economic, political, and cultural influence because of immigration.

Replacement theory has a long history, but no longer lies dormant — if it ever did — in the past, or in the black holes of the internet. The conspiracy allows white supremacist violence to remain “the most persistent and lethal threat” in America, as long as the country fails to root it out.

You still have not refuted how a porous southern border -- a policy of this administration -- will not cause dilution of the current citizenry. If someone wants to make the claim that this is "replacement theory," it could hardly be proven false. In other words, contrary to what this administration has been doing, they are not lying.
 
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Hotshoe

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You still have not refuted how a porous southern border -- a policy of this administration -- will not cause dilution of the current citizenry. If someone wants to make the claim that this is "replacement theory," it could hardly be proven false. In other words, contrary to what this administration has been doing, they are not lying.
He's dishonest as hell. We have lost twice as many to fentanyl in one year, vs what we lost in 20 years in Vietnam. They are fking clueless.