Renewable Energy Will Never Supply Our Needs?

bdgan

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May 29, 2008
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Tell us about these subsidies, and be specific.
Libs keep talking about the depletion allowance which is little more than depreciation that can be claimed by any company.

Cost depletion can be illustrated in this way:

An oil company invests $15 million in a property with an estimated oil reserve life of 15 years. The company deducts approximately $1,000,000 ($15 million/15 years) from taxable earnings each year until the initial investment is recouped in tax benefits.

The only legitimate controversy IMO is when companies use a percentage depletion which can result in deducting more than the original cost. This is offered to incentivize companies to keep working old wells that aren't so productive.
 
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KnightWhoSaysNit

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Libs keep talking about the depletion allowance which is little more than depreciation that can be claimed by any company.

Cost depletion can be illustrated in this way:

An oil company invests $15 million in a property with an estimated oil reserve life of 15 years. The company deducts approximately $1,000,000 ($15 million/15 years) from taxable earnings each year until the initial investment is recouped in tax benefits.

The only legitimate controversy IMO is when companies use a percentage depletion which can result in deducting more than the original cost. This is offered to incentivize companies to keep working old wells that aren't so productive.

You should have let him answer. I would have enjoyed that.
 

bdgan

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You should have let him answer. I would have enjoyed that.
That's the problem. Libs hear buzzwords like loopholes and tax breaks for the rich but those are words. There are parts of the tax code I disagree with and we could have an honest conversation about those things. Unfortunately libs don't know enough (or don't want to know enough) to discuss things intelligently.

It reminds me of when Obama said the tax code encourages companies to send jobs offshore but he would never weed explain how that was true. Apparently because they can deduct severance costs.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

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Solar panels are nuclear fusion powered.

When we make them in the USA, including the supply chain in their manufacture, then I will be 100% on board. Until then it is another Democrat-led national security risk. I would classify food and energy the same way I would classify any essential part within our military industrial complex.
 

PaoliLion

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Wind turbines generated more than 2,000 gigawatt-hours of electricity in the U.S. on Tuesday, March 29, more than was provided by nuclear and coal power plants that day. Wind power, which is renewable and does not release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, still trailed the electricity produced by natural gas, but it was the first time in U.S. history that wind turbines outperformed nuclear and coal power.

wait what..........

It also contributed ~65% of what natural gas did

It felt like yesterday that the yayhoos were arguing about how bad wind power was - turns out that the power industry isn’t as stupid as the folks on this board
 

rumble_lion

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Nuclear power is the greenest form of energy at the moment, and it's not a we thing. It's a them thing. these environmental zealots have been fighting it since I can recall and I was born in the early 60s
There is plenty of us more than willing to increase nuclear energy usage, them is the issue.

It's just way to expensive. Wind and solar are far cheaper now and getting cheaper every year.
When we make them in the USA, including the supply chain in their manufacture, then I will be 100% on board. Until then it is another Democrat-led national security risk. I would classify food and energy the same way I would classify any essential part within our military industrial complex.

I can see why importing oil is a national security risk as you consume the oil when you use it so you need to continuously import more. Solar panels last at least 25 years. I can't see how that is a big risk.

Also solar panels are made in the US.

1. Hanwha Q CELLS​

Hanwha Q CELLS, which was founded in 1999, is a subsidiary of South Korea-based Hanwha Solutions with a regional headquarters office in Irvine, California.

The Tier 1 company currently operates a 1.7 gigawatt (GW) solar panel manufacturing plant in Dalton, Georgia that began production in February 2019. Through its parent company, the business announced a $160 million investment in REC Silicon. The investment, which was announced in 2021, will help Q CELLS acquire low-carbon materials for solar cells and wafers.

Q CELLS offers high-performance mono passivated emitter and rear contact (PERC) solar panels for residential applications within the Q.PEAK DUO Series. The company also develops utility-scale solar projects across the U.S.

We recommend the Q.PEAK DUO BLK ML-G9 solar panel from Q CELLS, due to its high efficiency and performance in low-light conditions. This durable solar panel is ideal for areas that experience snowy and windy weather.

2. Jinko Solar​

Jinko Solar is a Shanghai, China-based solar panel manufacturing company. Founded in 2006, the Tier 1 business has a global footprint, consisting of six production plants and 15 subsidiaries. In the U.S., the company manufactures solar panels in Jacksonville, Florida.

Jinko Solar produces 400-watt and higher diamond half-cell solar panels under the Eagle Series.

Research and development (R&D) is a primary focus of Jinko Solar’s operations. In fact, the company’s R&D team holds numerous world records in the crystalline silicon solar panel category. Over the years, the business has made several notable donations to local communities and groups across the US.

Jinko Solar’s EAGLE 4 JKM390M-6RL3B polycrystalline panel is a top recommendation for home solar systems due to long-term reliability and consistent performance.

3. Silfab Solar​

Silfab Solar serves the North American solar market through its headquarters in Ontario, Canada. In the U.S., the company manufactures solar panels in Bellingham and Burlington, Washington. These sites have a combined manufacturing capacity of 800 megawatts (MW).

The business offers back-contact mono PERC solar panels under the Prime and Elite series for residential homeowners.

Silfab has over 40 years of experience in the solar industry, as well as an ongoing partnership with Titan Solar Power since 2018, which focuses on expanding residential solar installations. Through various investments, Silfab has been growing operations and solar module production.

The Silfab Elite SIL-380 solar panel is a top product for small to large residential installations. The high-quality panel boasts a sleek appearance that works well for a wide variety of rooftops.

4. Mission Solar​

Mission Solar Energy (Mission Solar) manufactures solar panels in San Antonio, Texas. Founded in 2013, the company has grown to meet the demands of both residential and commercial customers. OCI Company, which is based in South Korea, is the parent company of Mission Solar.

The company specializes in p-type monocrystalline PERC solar panels. These products offer high performance and are certified to standard regulations for reliability. The business does not offer inverters or battery storage products.

Mission Solar is an up and coming U.S. solar manufacturing company with a promising future. To date, the company has made a positive impact in the San Antonio area through robust job creation and business opportunities.

The MSE330SR8K is the best solar panel from Mission Solar due to reliable construction and high power output. This panel features an all-black design, helping it blend in with modern homes.

5. Solaria​

Solaria makes solar panels in its 40 MW manufacturing plant located in Fremont, California. The business initially started developing panels for utility projects, and then shifted its focus to serve the residential solar market. Founded in 2000, Solaria currently holds more than 250 patents related to solar panel technology.

This solar manufacturer specializes in shingled monocrystalline solar panels for homes. These panels are densely packed with cells in an overlapping configuration, helping the units exceed 20% efficiency during use. Solaria's success hinges on developing high-performance solar panels under the PowerXT series. It does not offer battery storage or inverters.

Solaria’s PowerXT-400R-PM is a top solar panel for homeowners looking for a high-quality product with a sleek, all-black appearance. The 400-watt panel comes with a 30-year warranty for reliability, which translates to peace of mind for homeowners.
 

PSUEngineer89

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Aug 14, 2021
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Just let the market decide.

Really, it is that simple.

We don’t need liberal arts majors telling us which source of energy is best.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

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Jul 19, 2010
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It's just way to expensive. Wind and solar are far cheaper now and getting cheaper every year.


I can see why importing oil is a national security risk as you consume the oil when you use it so you need to continuously import more. Solar panels last at least 25 years. I can't see how that is a big risk.

Also solar panels are made in the US.

1. Hanwha Q CELLS​

Hanwha Q CELLS, which was founded in 1999, is a subsidiary of South Korea-based Hanwha Solutions with a regional headquarters office in Irvine, California.

The Tier 1 company currently operates a 1.7 gigawatt (GW) solar panel manufacturing plant in Dalton, Georgia that began production in February 2019. Through its parent company, the business announced a $160 million investment in REC Silicon. The investment, which was announced in 2021, will help Q CELLS acquire low-carbon materials for solar cells and wafers.

Q CELLS offers high-performance mono passivated emitter and rear contact (PERC) solar panels for residential applications within the Q.PEAK DUO Series. The company also develops utility-scale solar projects across the U.S.

We recommend the Q.PEAK DUO BLK ML-G9 solar panel from Q CELLS, due to its high efficiency and performance in low-light conditions. This durable solar panel is ideal for areas that experience snowy and windy weather.

2. Jinko Solar​

Jinko Solar is a Shanghai, China-based solar panel manufacturing company. Founded in 2006, the Tier 1 business has a global footprint, consisting of six production plants and 15 subsidiaries. In the U.S., the company manufactures solar panels in Jacksonville, Florida.

Jinko Solar produces 400-watt and higher diamond half-cell solar panels under the Eagle Series.

Research and development (R&D) is a primary focus of Jinko Solar’s operations. In fact, the company’s R&D team holds numerous world records in the crystalline silicon solar panel category. Over the years, the business has made several notable donations to local communities and groups across the US.

Jinko Solar’s EAGLE 4 JKM390M-6RL3B polycrystalline panel is a top recommendation for home solar systems due to long-term reliability and consistent performance.

3. Silfab Solar​

Silfab Solar serves the North American solar market through its headquarters in Ontario, Canada. In the U.S., the company manufactures solar panels in Bellingham and Burlington, Washington. These sites have a combined manufacturing capacity of 800 megawatts (MW).

The business offers back-contact mono PERC solar panels under the Prime and Elite series for residential homeowners.

Silfab has over 40 years of experience in the solar industry, as well as an ongoing partnership with Titan Solar Power since 2018, which focuses on expanding residential solar installations. Through various investments, Silfab has been growing operations and solar module production.

The Silfab Elite SIL-380 solar panel is a top product for small to large residential installations. The high-quality panel boasts a sleek appearance that works well for a wide variety of rooftops.

4. Mission Solar​

Mission Solar Energy (Mission Solar) manufactures solar panels in San Antonio, Texas. Founded in 2013, the company has grown to meet the demands of both residential and commercial customers. OCI Company, which is based in South Korea, is the parent company of Mission Solar.

The company specializes in p-type monocrystalline PERC solar panels. These products offer high performance and are certified to standard regulations for reliability. The business does not offer inverters or battery storage products.

Mission Solar is an up and coming U.S. solar manufacturing company with a promising future. To date, the company has made a positive impact in the San Antonio area through robust job creation and business opportunities.

The MSE330SR8K is the best solar panel from Mission Solar due to reliable construction and high power output. This panel features an all-black design, helping it blend in with modern homes.

5. Solaria​

Solaria makes solar panels in its 40 MW manufacturing plant located in Fremont, California. The business initially started developing panels for utility projects, and then shifted its focus to serve the residential solar market. Founded in 2000, Solaria currently holds more than 250 patents related to solar panel technology.

This solar manufacturer specializes in shingled monocrystalline solar panels for homes. These panels are densely packed with cells in an overlapping configuration, helping the units exceed 20% efficiency during use. Solaria's success hinges on developing high-performance solar panels under the PowerXT series. It does not offer battery storage or inverters.

Solaria’s PowerXT-400R-PM is a top solar panel for homeowners looking for a high-quality product with a sleek, all-black appearance. The 400-watt panel comes with a 30-year warranty for reliability, which translates to peace of mind for homeowners.


Are you telling me that the solar panels from these companies are completely sourced within the USA, right down to the rare earth metals? (I don't think so.)

Please tell us where the materials are mined and manufactured.
 

rumble_lion

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Aug 7, 2011
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Just let the market decide.

Really, it is that simple.

We don’t need liberal arts majors telling us which source of energy is best.

The market is deciding.

Renewable energy power plants continue to dominate new power capacity additions in the United States. In December, approximately 80% of new power capacity in the country came from renewables, following an even bigger month of November in which the split was 90% for renewables. For the full year, renewables accounted for 83–84% of new power capacity.​
 
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interrobang

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Aug 21, 2016
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The market is deciding.

Renewable energy power plants continue to dominate new power capacity additions in the United States. In December, approximately 80% of new power capacity in the country came from renewables, following an even bigger month of November in which the split was 90% for renewables. For the full year, renewables accounted for 83–84% of new power capacity.​

But how many of those are Solyndras?
 
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rumble_lion

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Are you telling me that the solar panels from these companies are completely sourced within the USA, right down to the rare earth metals? (I don't think so.)

Please tell us where the materials are mined and manufactured.

I'm sure they are sourced with the USA about as much as anything is.

I'm sure you don't support this of course:

The President will issue a directive, authorizing the use of the Defense Production Act to secure American production of critical materials to bolster our clean energy economy by reducing our reliance on China and other countries for the minerals and materials that will power our clean energy future.​
Specifically, the DPA will be authorized to support the production and processing of minerals and materials used for large capacity batteries–such as lithium, nickel, cobalt, graphite, and manganese—and the Department of Defense will implement this authority using strong environmental, labor, community, and tribal consultation standards.​
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

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I'm sure they are sourced with the USA about as much as anything is.

I'm sure you don't support this of course:

The President will issue a directive, authorizing the use of the Defense Production Act to secure American production of critical materials to bolster our clean energy economy by reducing our reliance on China and other countries for the minerals and materials that will power our clean energy future.​
Specifically, the DPA will be authorized to support the production and processing of minerals and materials used for large capacity batteries–such as lithium, nickel, cobalt, graphite, and manganese—and the Department of Defense will implement this authority using strong environmental, labor, community, and tribal consultation standards.​

So that's what goes into a solar cell? Or would that be a battery? And isn't this a subsidy?

By the way, when comparing fossil fuels to renewables please use an apples to apples comparison. Renewables do not run at "capacity." In fact one can often drive by a windmill that is not turning. What happens to a solar cell when it snows?
 

rumble_lion

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But how many of those are Solyndras?

Did you know that Solyndra did accomplish the goals set out for it?

The idea behind Solyndra was to come up with a process for making solar panels without using polysilicon which was very expensive at the time. They did accomplish that goal but unfortunately for them the Chinese starting producing tons of cheap polysilicon.

Between 2009 and mid-2011 the price of polysilicon, the key ingredient for most competing technologies, dropped by about 89%. This precipitous drop in the cost of raw materials for Solyndra's competitors rendered CIGS technology incapable of competing, and other factors​
 

rumble_lion

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So that's what goes into a solar cell? Or would that be a battery? And isn't this a subsidy?

By the way, when comparing fossil fuels to renewables please use an apples to apples comparison. Renewables do not run at "capacity." In fact one can often drive by a windmill that is not turning. What happens to a solar cell when it snows?

So that's what goes into a solar cell? Or would that be a battery? And isn't this a subsidy?

Let me see if I understand your views here. If we produce it ourselves that bad because of subsidies. But if we import then that is bad because we are depending on foreign country for critical materials.

I'd say let the free market decide but then you go right back to importing it from lower cost countries. So there you go.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

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So that's what goes into a solar cell? Or would that be a battery? And isn't this a subsidy?

Let me see if I understand your views here. If we produce it ourselves that bad because of subsidies. But if we import then that is bad because we are depending on foreign country for critical materials.

I'd say let the free market decide but then you go right back to importing it from lower cost countries. So there you go.

In the end, renewables are not economic, right? We should be able to make it here at a competitive cost against other forms of domestic energy. But it seems that we can't.

Again, I wouldn't be so opposed if it were not for the fact that this enriches China while making our country even more vulnerable. And unless the Chinese change, it will do nothing for the ultimate goal claimed by the Democrats (deal with climate change). China, Russia, India, etc. do not care about climate change. They care about economics and power.

Why should we pay more for energy, with the resulting inflation, to clean up the atmosphere when what we are doing does next to nothing to clean up the atmosphere?
 

rumble_lion

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In the end, renewables are not economic, right? We should be able to make it here at a competitive cost against other forms of domestic energy. But it seems that we can't.

Again, I wouldn't be so opposed if it were not for the fact that this enriches China while making our country even more vulnerable. And unless the Chinese change, it will do nothing for the ultimate goal claimed by the Democrats (deal with climate change). China, Russia, India, etc. do not care about climate change. They care about economics and power.

Why should we pay more for energy, with the resulting inflation, to clean up the atmosphere when what we are doing does next to nothing to clean up the atmosphere?

In the end, renewables are not economic, right? We should be able to make it here at a competitive cost against other forms of domestic energy. But it seems that we can't.

If that is the standard you want to keep then we will need to stop making about 95% of the stuff we currently make. These MBA's for the last 40 years have been pushing outsourcing just about everything to increase profits. Now that Covid has wreaked havoc on these supply chains that sometimes stretch all around the world, maybe companies are rethinking things.
 

rumble_lion

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In the end, renewables are not economic, right? We should be able to make it here at a competitive cost against other forms of domestic energy. But it seems that we can't.

Again, I wouldn't be so opposed if it were not for the fact that this enriches China while making our country even more vulnerable. And unless the Chinese change, it will do nothing for the ultimate goal claimed by the Democrats (deal with climate change). China, Russia, India, etc. do not care about climate change. They care about economics and power.

Why should we pay more for energy, with the resulting inflation, to clean up the atmosphere when what we are doing does next to nothing to clean up the atmosphere?

And, of course, we'll completely ignore the disposal issues of damaged or deactivated turbines.

Where is there a disposal problem with turbines?

Wind turbine components are essentially 100% recyclable. Their different parts are dismantled, sorted and then sent through specialised recovery channels. The concrete used for their foundations is reused on other sites, steel and aluminium are sent to foundries or steelworks, and fibreglass from turbine blades is reused for other products, such as fire hydrants. In Port-La-Nouvelle (Aude), ENGIE decommissioned the first wind farm to be connected to France’s national grid, recycling over 96% of its components.
 

rumble_lion

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Solar panels, also known as photovoltaic or PV panels, are made to last more than 25 years. In fact, many solar panels installed as early as the 1980s are still working at expected capacity. Not only are solar panels remarkably reliable, solar panel longevity has increased dramatically over the last 20 years. In addition to decades of effective performance, many solar manufacturers back their products with performance guarantees in their warranties.

Keep in mind that expected solar panel life expectancy doesn’t mean the panels on your roof will stop producing electricity after a couple of decades. It just means their energy production will decrease by what solar panel manufacturers consider optimal to meet the average American family’s energy needs.

As with most technologies, solar panels will naturally produce less energy over time. This reduced power output is called the degradation rate. The median solar panel degradation rate is about 0.5%, which simply means that a solar panel’s energy production will decrease at a rate of 0.5% per year.3 After 20 years, your panels should still be working at about 90% of its original output.
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

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In the end, renewables are not economic, right? We should be able to make it here at a competitive cost against other forms of domestic energy. But it seems that we can't.

If that is the standard you want to keep then we will need to stop making about 95% of the stuff we currently make. These MBA's for the last 40 years have been pushing outsourcing just about everything to increase profits. Now that Covid has wreaked havoc on these supply chains that sometimes stretch all around the world, maybe companies are rethinking things.

You skirted my point. I'll try to be more clear: Why should we subsidize something that will not have a material effect on climate but that will make us less competitive economically? (i.e., cause more inflation or a higher tax burden)

Importing the stuff for "green" is backing out our own energy production. That is an economic negative. And again, the Chinese do not care about climate change. Nor do most of the countries in Asia.

Simply put, I think this whole thing is stupid and just another Democrat-led hot button topic to energize their electorate. They need to stay emotional about something.

Is the climate changing? Yes. Can we do something about it without Asia being on board? An emphatic NO.
 
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DJ Spanky

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Where is there a disposal problem with turbines?

Wind turbine components are essentially 100% recyclable.

That's a crock of shit.

1200x-1.jpg


Wind Turbine Blades Can’t Be Recycled, So They’re Piling Up in Landfills
 

rumble_lion

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  • GE Renewable Energy announced Tuesday a multi-year agreement with Veolia North America for the first U.S. wind turbine blade recycling program of its kind.
  • The majority of blades from onshore turbines that GE changes out during repowering efforts will be shredded and used to replace raw materials for cement manufacturing, creating a "circular economy for composite materials," Anne McEntee, CEO of GE Renewable Energy's Digital Services, said in a statement. In Europe, such recycling processes have grown to commercial scale, and GE plans to deploy the program at scale quickly.
  • The process will make wind turbines fully recyclable, while reducing carbon dioxide emissions from cement production by a net 27%, according to environmental impact analysis by Quantis U.S. The reprocessed blade has a net-positive environmental impact by replacing coal or other raw materials in the cement production process, according to GE.
 

DJ Spanky

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Yeah, and I've also heard the turbine fairies are going to change the turbine blades into moondust and unicorns.

Get back to me when something real is implemented and actually working.

In the meantime I'll just talk about how harnessed fusion power is going to provide us with unlimited energy. They're close, it's gonna happen any day now. Any day.
 

ao5884

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Wind turbines generated more than 2,000 gigawatt-hours of electricity in the U.S. on Tuesday, March 29, more than was provided by nuclear and coal power plants that day. Wind power, which is renewable and does not release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, still trailed the electricity produced by natural gas, but it was the first time in U.S. history that wind turbines outperformed nuclear and coal power.

wait what..........
The wind stopped....now what?
 

ao5884

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Oct 1, 2019
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The market is deciding.

Renewable energy power plants continue to dominate new power capacity additions in the United States. In December, approximately 80% of new power capacity in the country came from renewables, following an even bigger month of November in which the split was 90% for renewables. For the full year, renewables accounted for 83–84% of new power capacity.​
 

KnightWhoSaysNit

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Yeah, I don't think so.

@rumble_lion it seems you punted when we got down to the economic part, i.e., energy is part of national security. It is a major driver for inflation. NG is a reason we did not have inflation during the latter half of the 2010s. It's a reason Trump had growth without inflation by unleashing the industry. Add tax cuts and personal wealth grew. Solar is not cost-competitive with US energy production (i.e., natural gas). And finally, it does nothing for climate change since most of the rest of the world is not on board.

I still love the EV thing. Great performance and simplicity, but the battery technology is not here yet. It's not cost-competitive with an ICE. If it was competitive I would be buying one for sure.

We should be pursuing battery technology development and production. But solar panels and windmills are not a solution for generation unless we are interested in having a lower standard of living and rolling blackouts. All it will take is an arctic cold front during the winter with some snow. Short daylight hours and a loss of wind and suddenly people freeze and can't travel. Those heat pumps won't work. Homeowners with electric will be consuming resistance heat. This is why if you want to eliminate fossil fuels nuclear is the only practical solution.

In sum, we are putting ourselves at a competitive disadvantage by not using our own resources for marginal energy consumption. This isn't complicated. If solar and wind are justified they would need no subsidies, effectively hiding the cost and burying it into everything we buy.

If solar made sense China would be deploying solar farms on the margin instead of coal-fired power plants. Producers like Russia would implement solar instead of consuming their oil.

What we have right now is a market-interrupted bounce created by political action. What we got is inflation and lower living standards.
 
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LafayetteBear

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This is pretty cool.

West Virginia’s largest solar farm will sit on the site of the 5,800-acre Hobet Mine, one of the state’s largest former coal mines, which went bankrupt in 2015.​
The solar farm will be situated on 3,000 acres of the site, which straddles Boone and Lincoln counties in the southwestern part of the state, near Charleston. It will power an adjacent 2,800-acre site that will host industry, lodging, hospitality, and recreation, and the whole site will be known as SunPark. The solar farm is the first phase of the project.​
The 250-megawatt solar farm is spearheaded by SEVA WV.​
Wait, a large solar array installed on the site of a former coal mine?! In West Virginia?! Bwahahahaha! The noise you hear is the sound of Trump Cultist heads exploding.

Pandazapper is likely to submit a lengthy rant about this. If he doesn’t stroke out first.
 
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LafayetteBear

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Nuclear power is the greenest form of energy at the moment, and it's not a we thing. It's a them thing. these environmental zealots have been fighting it since I can recall and I was born in the early 60s
There is plenty of us more than willing to increase nuclear energy usage, them is the issue.
I think they should store the spent fuel rods under DUHrbon’s house. What could possibly be wrong with that? After all, nuclear power is the “greenest form of energy.”
 
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rumble_lion

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Nuclear power is the greenest form of energy at the moment, and it's not a we thing. It's a them thing. these environmental zealots have been fighting it since I can recall and I was born in the early 60s
There is plenty of us more than willing to increase nuclear energy usage, them is the issue.

I don't have a problem with nuclear power but it does have some high hurdles to overcome.

Construction cost and build times are outrageous. We just don't have a lot of knowledge on how to build these plants because very few are ever built. So you end up with massive cost overruns and delays. It's not cost competitive with really anything at this point.

Location, location, location. Nobody wants a nuke plant near where they live.

Disposal of nuclear waste. Storing spent fuel on site in cooled pools of water is not a solution.
 

rumble_lion

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Wait, a large solar array installed on the site of a former coal mine?! In West Virginia?! Bwahahahaha! The noise you hear is the sound of Trump Cultist heads exploding.

Pandazapper is likely to submit a lengthy rant about this. If he doesn’t stroke out first.

There is more....

The Kentucky Coal Mining Museum in Benham, owned by Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College, is switching to solar power to save money. The museum, which memorializes Kentucky’s history in coal mining, is modernizing with a new form of cheaper energy.​
Communications director Brandon Robinson told CNN affiliate WYMT that the project “will help save at least eight to ten thousand dollars, off the energy costs on this building alone.”​
 

royboy

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Lewisville, NC

...rising metal prices, as the cost of steel, copper, and fuel for the equipment used to install wind turbines increases.

For example, according to the International Energy Agency, the average wind turbine uses approximately 2,900 kilograms (6,393 pounds) of copper per megawatt of installed capacity. This means that the copper used in a 1 MW wind turbine would have cost $16.877 in December of 2019, but now costs $30,000.