OT - hotels in Paris and Cannes

Nitwit

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Jul 18, 2001
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All knowing board - I'm looking for hotel recommendions in Paris - probably want to stay on the left bank in districts 5 or 6. Main plus for me would be to be in a great neighborhood of restaurants, shops, galleries, etc. and I would want air conditioning and wifi. (4 star or above) For Cannes, I haven't been there before, but would like a hotel with a good water view and again convenient to walk through neighborhoods of cafes, etc. Anyone with first hand experiences, please provide your recommendations.
 
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anon_xdc8rmuek44eq

Guest
All knowing board - I'm looking for hotel recommendions in Paris - probably want to stay on the left bank in districts 5 or 6. Main plus for me would be to be in a great neighborhood of restaurants, shops, galleries, etc. and I would want air conditioning and wifi. (4 star or above) For Cannes, I haven't been there before, but would like a hotel with a good water view and again convenient to walk through neighborhoods of cafes, etc. Anyone with first hand experiences, please provide your recommendations.

Wife and I always stay right off of Blvd. St. Germain in the heart of the 6th at one of two hotels:

Hotel de Buci:

http://www.buci-hotel.com/?lang=en

Artus Hotel

http://www.artushotel.com/

Both are right off of Blvd. St. Germain (on Rue de Buci) and less than a block from Cafe de Flore, Les Deux Magots, the Mabillion Metro station, and all the great restaurants, cafes, cocktail bars, and shops the Left Bank has to offer. I will say this area can get a bit noisy at night - there are a lot of great bars and cafes open late in the area and if you linger around Cafe de Flore for a bit you'll see models and other rich/fancy celebrity types heading to Club Montana (we like to get some champagne and watch all the 'normal' folks try to get in, only to be rejected time after time...oh, and we saw Karl Lagerfeld buy a paper at a local stand one night like it was no big deal). But, the noise never bothered me. We have stayed at one other, more well known hotel in the area (Hotel Lutetia) and while it was fine, it wasn't as convenient as the other two.

Hotel de Buci and Artus Hotel are owned by the same company, and while they're on the same street, Hotel de Buci is done in a more traditional, Louis XIV style decor, compared to the more modern, boutique-y Artus Hotel. Both have smaller, European style rooms, and very small elevators. But, the staff are always super accommodating, everything is clean and well kept (including the mini bar), and the location is unmatched. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend either not knowing your personal preferences at this point.

Hotel Lutetia is bigger and more well known, but it's not as centrally located (though it's a good location - just not as 'convenient' as the other two) and the rooms didn't feel as comfortable (even though they were bigger). They also have a fantastic well regarded restaurant on the premises in case you do not want to wander too far.

Hotel Lutetia

http://lutetia-hotel.parishotelinn.com/en/

Happy to help with anything else related to your trip to Paris! Sorry I can't comment on Cannes - have never been (but, have been to Nice a few times...).
 
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Nitwit

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Your're the man Midnighter, thank you. Hotel de Buci is pretty much what I had in mind. I prefer that type of decor to the more modern hotels. Was wondering if you've ever heard of the Melia Colbert in the Odean St. Michel neighborhood? It looks intriguing based on the trip advisor write up, but other than that I don't know anything about it. I know there are a million small hotels in Paris.

So when you're in the St. Germain area, what restaurants or cafes do you recommend? Not looking for loud bars, I'm way too old for that.

Thanks again
 
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tgar

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We have stayed at the Marriott Trocadero twice with a fabulous little courtyard and a fantastic Gin Bar. The rooms here are more American and the Hotel is situated in the 16th snail segment. Just a couple of blocks to the Arc and in the other direction, the Eiffel Tower is a short distance. Great Cafes and restaurants, jazz, shopping, and museums galore. Victor Hugo did his writing here.

This a wonderful walking area and you will most certainly walk here often. While this is a very Parisian area, where Midnighter suggests is even more so. ( and you will end up in that area often as well ).

Paris is truly one of the great walking city's, I hope you are going in the spring when all of the city is in bloom ( I have only been in the fall, would love to go sometime in May )

We always do a pretty good job of figuring everything out but used Viator to get a personal front of the line tour of the Louvre. We also used them for a fantastic afternoon walk through the old Jewish Section visiting a dozen or so pastry, chocolate and specialty shoppes, decadent. I like walking tours in very small groups where the guide has a very vast amount of knowledge and pride in what is being discussed.

Enjoy.
 
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anon_xdc8rmuek44eq

Guest
Your're the man Midnighter, thank you. Hotel de Buci is pretty much what I had in mind. I prefer that type of decor to the more modern hotels. Was wondering if you've ever heard of the Melia Colbert in the Odean St. Michel neighborhood? It looks intriguing based on the trip advisor write up, but other than that I don't know anything about it. I know there are a million small hotels in Paris.

So when you're in the St. Germain area, what restaurants or cafes do you recommend? Not looking for loud bars, I'm way too old for that.

Thanks again

Sorry - don't know much about the hotels or neighborhoods you mentioned; sort of a creature of habit when it comes to Paris and every time we think of trying to stay somewhere new, we cave to staying at places we know and are comfortable with. We are toying with the idea of staying at the Ritz for our 10 year anniversary, but that would take us to the much busier, more touristy Right Bank which I don't know as well.

As to places to eat, we definitely have our favorites. Most are within walking distance to Rue de Buci too.

Our favorite local steak frites place is le Relais de l’Entrecôte, and there are a few locations throughout Paris (and one in NYC - which I'm happy to say is just as good) but there is one about a block and half from Rue de Buci. You'll see a good mix of locals and tourists alike, and there will be a line forming around 5:45pm (dinner starts at 6:00pm). I will say I've waited in line multiple times, and it's worth it. The only thing on the menu is steak frites, so when you order all they ask is 'How do you want your meat?'. And it's served with a 'secret' sauce that is very herbal/buttery, so if that's not your bag tell them you don't want it (otherwise, the steak and frites will come smothered in it, and it's fantastic!). You'll get a fresh salad with walnuts, with a traditional dijon mustard sauce and French bread prior to your meal (save the bread to sop up the delicious sauce the steak is served with), and when the steak comes, you get one plate, and then a re-fill once you're finished for about 23.00 Euro. A bottle of their house wine is about the same, which I find to be very reasonable. Finish dinner with one of their spectacular desserts (I always go for the profiteroles) and voila!

http://relaisennr.cluster011.ovh.net/?page_id=396

dba79f_a2d71fd0acd643359a2fd2d0e60308ec.jpg_srz_820_380_85_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srz


For lunch, we love the Brittany style buckwheat crepes at the Little Breizh, also within a short walk to Hotel de Buci. Their lunch special is a savory crepe and a beverage (we typically get the traditional dry, boozy cider) for about 13 Euro. It can get busy as there is seating for only about 15 or so, but if you get there before the rush there typically isn't a wait.

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaura...eviews-Little_Breizh-Paris_Ile_de_France.html

breizh-cafe.jpg


For a 'fancier' dinner, we have two favorites - Le Coupe Chou, which is a nice walk from Rue de Buci, but doable. Wife and I eat here every time we're in Paris because the ambience is amazing and cozy, the food is very good, and we got engaged here. It's a family owned place with traditional rustic French comfort food offerings, and everything I've had has been great. I will say we always start with the oeuf en cocotte (which is some kind of egg/butter/cheese pot you stir and dip your bread in) - and it's amazing.

http://www.lecoupechou.com/

le-coupe-chou.jpg


oeufs-cocottes.jpg


Our other go to, which is a bit too far to walk but a short cab drive away, is Josephine Chez Dumonet (or Chez Josephine). It's very traditional French cuisine and gets filled up nearly every night - you will definitely need reservations (don't be afraid to book early - the meal can take a good amount of time and they'll typically offer a complimentary glass of wine, small plate such as spargel with hollandaise sauce when in season, or an amuse bouche at some point during or before the meal). The last time we were there I got the pork shank - and it was ridiculous - though they're known for their beef bourguignon.

http://www.chez-josephine.fr/

056%2B-%2BJosephine%2BChez%2BDumonet%2B%25282%2529.JPG


7601440852_6421824d4f.jpg


Other places to visit or have a drink at are Cafe de Flore and Les Deux Magots - two traditional, but very popular/touristy - cafes where people watching is the thing to do. They're open late so if you want a cocktail, glass of wine or champagne, or small bite it's the place to go. The food isn't spectacular, but you won't be there for that anyway. Go there around noon, bring a writing pad, order a tall white wine, and pretend to be Hemingway. They're both right next to the oldest church in paris - the Cathedral St. Germain des Pres - which is striking at night (and there is an awesome sweet crepe stand out in front that is perfect for after drinks on the walk home).

caf_de_flore_paris-670x300.jpg


5057217011_9fab395036_b.jpg


706c3c0f_original.jpg


Another cool place to visit is Cafe Procope, which has been open since 1686. Only visited for a glass of champagne one night, but it's been around forever and everyone whose anyone has been there (Benjamin Franklin, Voltaire, Hemingway, etc.). Worth visiting for the history alone, though I hear the food is good too.

Le_Procope_Cafe_Procope.jpg


The other great thing about St. Germain is that if you tire of awesome French/Italian/European cuisine and want a beer and a place to watch American college football, there is a Canadian sports bar called 'The Moose' within walking distance as well. We watched that dreadful Illinois game from two years ago here before dinner. The food is very 'sports bar' food - nachos, chicken tenders, burgers, etc., but they have a good beer selection and tons of TVs with every sport imaginable on. English speaking waitresses too, so that's a nice bonus.

http://www.mooseparis.com/

chris-ogrady-moose-paris.jpg


And though not in St. Germain, if re-opened I would recommend taking a trip to The Ritz to Bar Hemingway for a before or after dinner drink. Reservations not required, but we went early one night and didn't have a problem getting a seat. The cocktails are expensive (25 Euro each), but it's a good place to go when dressed up a bit, and typically is regarded as one of the best bars in the world. It's been under renovation (the entire Ritz has) for some time, so not sure if it has re-opened or not. If it has, GO.

750x422


6a00d8345200d669e201538fc8b3cb970b-pi
 
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Nitwit

Well-Known Member
Jul 18, 2001
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Pennsylvania
Great info, merci boucoup. I'll be sure to take in a few of those recommendations. My only other trip to Paris we stayed in the Trocadero area about half way between the Arc de Triumphe and the river. Had a nice view of the Eiffel Tower at night. We did the most visited sites, so this time I was more looking for a great area to hang out, go to a few of the smaller museums, and get a feeling for the Parisian life before hopping onto a high speed train bound for Nice. We will transfer most likely to Cannes for a week before flying home. If your ever down in Ocean City, i'll make you a nice French Martini.
 
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anon_xdc8rmuek44eq

Guest
Great info, merci boucoup. I'll be sure to take in a few of those recommendations. My only other trip to Paris we stayed in the Trocadero area about half way between the Arc de Triumphe and the river. Had a nice view of the Eiffel Tower at night. We did the most visited sites, so this time I was more looking for a great area to hang out, go to a few of the smaller museums, and get a feeling for the Parisian life before hopping onto a high speed train bound for Nice. We will transfer most likely to Cannes for a week before flying home. If your ever down in Ocean City, i'll make you a nice French Martini.

Deal! And if you discover something new and noteworthy in Paris, please share! Would also love to hear a re-cap of your trip when it's over.
 

Peetz Pool Boy

Well-Known Member
Jun 11, 2014
7,248
3,866
1
Sorry - don't know much about the hotels or neighborhoods you mentioned; sort of a creature of habit when it comes to Paris and every time we think of trying to stay somewhere new, we cave to staying at places we know and are comfortable with. We are toying with the idea of staying at the Ritz for our 10 year anniversary, but that would take us to the much busier, more touristy Right Bank which I don't know as well.

As to places to eat, we definitely have our favorites. Most are within walking distance to Rue de Buci too.

Our favorite local steak frites place is le Relais de l’Entrecôte, and there are a few locations throughout Paris (and one in NYC - which I'm happy to say is just as good) but there is one about a block and half from Rue de Buci. You'll see a good mix of locals and tourists alike, and there will be a line forming around 5:45pm (dinner starts at 6:00pm). I will say I've waited in line multiple times, and it's worth it. The only thing on the menu is steak frites, so when you order all they ask is 'How do you want your meat?'. And it's served with a 'secret' sauce that is very herbal/buttery, so if that's not your bag tell them you don't want it (otherwise, the steak and frites will come smothered in it, and it's fantastic!). You'll get a fresh salad with walnuts, with a traditional dijon mustard sauce and French bread prior to your meal (save the bread to sop up the delicious sauce the steak is served with), and when the steak comes, you get one plate, and then a re-fill once you're finished for about 23.00 Euro. A bottle of their house wine is about the same, which I find to be very reasonable. Finish dinner with one of their spectacular desserts (I always go for the profiteroles) and voila!

http://relaisennr.cluster011.ovh.net/?page_id=396

dba79f_a2d71fd0acd643359a2fd2d0e60308ec.jpg_srz_820_380_85_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srz


For lunch, we love the Brittany style buckwheat crepes at the Little Breizh, also within a short walk to Hotel de Buci. Their lunch special is a savory crepe and a beverage (we typically get the traditional dry, boozy cider) for about 13 Euro. It can get busy as there is seating for only about 15 or so, but if you get there before the rush there typically isn't a wait.

http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaura...eviews-Little_Breizh-Paris_Ile_de_France.html

breizh-cafe.jpg


For a 'fancier' dinner, we have two favorites - Le Coupe Chou, which is a nice walk from Rue de Buci, but doable. Wife and I eat here every time we're in Paris because the ambience is amazing and cozy, the food is very good, and we got engaged here. It's a family owned place with traditional rustic French comfort food offerings, and everything I've had has been great. I will say we always start with the oeuf en cocotte (which is some kind of egg/butter/cheese pot you stir and dip your bread in) - and it's amazing.

http://www.lecoupechou.com/

le-coupe-chou.jpg


oeufs-cocottes.jpg


Our other go to, which is a bit too far to walk but a short cab drive away, is Josephine Chez Dumonet (or Chez Josephine). It's very traditional French cuisine and gets filled up nearly every night - you will definitely need reservations (don't be afraid to book early - the meal can take a good amount of time and they'll typically offer a complimentary glass of wine, small plate such as spargel with hollandaise sauce when in season, or an amuse bouche at some point during or before the meal). The last time we were there I got the pork shank - and it was ridiculous - though they're known for their beef bourguignon.

http://www.chez-josephine.fr/

056%2B-%2BJosephine%2BChez%2BDumonet%2B%25282%2529.JPG


7601440852_6421824d4f.jpg


Other places to visit or have a drink at are Cafe de Flore and Les Deux Magots - two traditional, but very popular/touristy - cafes where people watching is the thing to do. They're open late so if you want a cocktail, glass of wine or champagne, or small bite it's the place to go. The food isn't spectacular, but you won't be there for that anyway. Go there around noon, bring a writing pad, order a tall white wine, and pretend to be Hemingway. They're both right next to the oldest church in paris - the Cathedral St. Germain des Pres - which is striking at night (and there is an awesome sweet crepe stand out in front that is perfect for after drinks on the walk home).

caf_de_flore_paris-670x300.jpg


5057217011_9fab395036_b.jpg


706c3c0f_original.jpg


Another cool place to visit is Cafe Procope, which has been open since 1686. Only visited for a glass of champagne one night, but it's been around forever and everyone whose anyone has been there (Benjamin Franklin, Voltaire, Hemingway, etc.). Worth visiting for the history alone, though I hear the food is good too.

Le_Procope_Cafe_Procope.jpg


The other great thing about St. Germain is that if you tire of awesome French/Italian/European cuisine and want a beer and a place to watch American college football, there is a Canadian sports bar called 'The Moose' within walking distance as well. We watched that dreadful Illinois game from two years ago here before dinner. The food is very 'sports bar' food - nachos, chicken tenders, burgers, etc., but they have a good beer selection and tons of TVs with every sport imaginable on. English speaking waitresses too, so that's a nice bonus.

http://www.mooseparis.com/

chris-ogrady-moose-paris.jpg


And though not in St. Germain, if re-opened I would recommend taking a trip to The Ritz to Bar Hemingway for a before or after dinner drink. Reservations not required, but we went early one night and didn't have a problem getting a seat. The cocktails are expensive (25 Euro each), but it's a good place to go when dressed up a bit, and typically is regarded as one of the best bars in the world. It's been under renovation (the entire Ritz has) for some time, so not sure if it has re-opened or not. If it has, GO.

750x422


6a00d8345200d669e201538fc8b3cb970b-pi
I don't have many idols, but you are one of my "travel idols".

That said, Paris is a large city and has a multitude of interesting places outside of St. Germaine. I understand your and wife's attraction to what is familiar, but life (and Paris) are an adventure....sometimes pleasant, other times not so much.
 
A

anon_xdc8rmuek44eq

Guest
I don't have many idols, but you are one of my "travel idols".

That said, Paris is a large city and has a multitude of interesting places outside of St. Germaine. I understand your and wife's attraction to what is familiar, but life (and Paris) are an adventure....sometimes pleasant, other times not so much.

Agree - think we'll make an effort to do a bit more exploring next time. I will say when I was younger and living in Germany I stayed in other parts of Paris, which weren't terrible despite being a good metro ride away from the 'better' parts of Paris.