Naomi Osaka refusing post match interviews at French Open ...

Midnighter2

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When did her mental illness make it unbearable to field questions from the media? Apparently she had no difficulty taking with the media previously when she was discussing her support for BLM and “social justice” issues.

I don't think she said she 'couldn't' do interviews - just that it was very uncomfortable and stressful.
 

Aardvark86

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When did her mental illness make it unbearable to field questions from the media? Apparently she had no difficulty taking with the media previously when she was discussing her support for BLM and “social justice” issues.
Probably about the time you figured you ought to go to the er to get that wrist checked out because the swelling hadn’t gone down.
 

Erial_Lion

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When did her mental illness make it unbearable to field questions from the media? Apparently she had no difficulty taking with the media previously when she was discussing her support for BLM and “social justice” issues.
Mental health isn’t quite as black and white as you portray...it’s not like one day she’s perfect, and the next day she’s awful. And how would you know that she had “no difficulty” in speaking to the media previously? (Or are you just so blinded by the fact that she uses her platform to advance social causes that she believes in that you need to cast her in a negative light?)
 

Obliviax

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Bottom line, the issue could have been minimized and/or mitigated completely if both Roland Garros and Osaka's team chose to communicate directly with each other directly rather than using social media.
Agreed. I do wonder what is more powerful and/or lucrative now. I am not a tennis fan and had no idea who she was. Now, she is the kim kardashian of woman's tennis. Perhaps this is all just a death twitch from the MSM and they simply can no longer handle their diminishing impact on things.
 

DELion

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1950 called. It wants it's antiquated thinking about mental illness back.
It's always quaint when people invoke ageism to try and bolster their point. Sorry, but there is nothing antiquated about contractual law. The contracts are written to protect all parties. If she wanted a mental health clause, she would have had to negotiate it. She should have consulted with her lawyers before announcing she was skipping the media interviews. Maybe if she had, they could have worked with the French Open officials to come to some reasonable agreement - like forfeiting any and all potential prize money in exchange for skipping interviews. Fairness has to be considered at some point. It would be a competitive advantage for one player to skip the media while the others honor their obligation, as uncomfortable as it might be for them.
 

thewholebit

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No idea who this person is, yet I support them. I’m sure you’ve all seen in the same media today Madonna being canonized because her son is wearing a dress.
 

NJPSU

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The idea that a sport will dry up and die if a player doesn't do a post game interview is ridiculous. This is especially true in today's age where a player can go to twitter or social media and speak directly to a fan if they so choose.

Networks don't make money from post game interviews. They make money selling commercials during the competition. I've probably watched 30 seconds of Saquon Barkley interview footage in my entire life. Who cares?

The other thing is there is zero risk that the majority of athletes will go into a shell and not want their persona out there for public consumption. Most athletes can't get enough of the spotlight. Leave the girl alone and let her play.
 

NittPicker

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pa108

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That article/statement doesnt change the facts.

Professional athletes are entertainers. Even though they may think they get paid for "balling", they are entertainers, just like circus fire-eaters, raps stars, and the Philharmonic. They are paid, directly or indirectly, by the people who enjoy watching their expertise.

If interacting with the media (as a conduit to their fans) is part of the deal, then its part of the deal.
 

dailybuck777

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That article/statement doesnt change the facts.

Professional athletes are entertainers. Even though they may think they get paid for "balling", they are entertainers, just like circus fire-eaters, raps stars, and the Philharmonic. They are paid, directly or indirectly, by the people who enjoy watching their expertise.

If interacting with the media (as a conduit to their fans) is part of the deal, then its part of the deal.
Interviews are simply part of her job. If she can't do interviews she can't do her job. If the players don't want to do interviews they can negotiate a contract giving them that right. Presumably they will make less money. If this is such an important issue then the players should be happy to renegotiate and take less money. Players can't have it both ways.
 

Obliviax

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That article/statement doesnt change the facts.

Professional athletes are entertainers. Even though they may think they get paid for "balling", they are entertainers, just like circus fire-eaters, raps stars, and the Philharmonic. They are paid, directly or indirectly, by the people who enjoy watching their expertise.

If interacting with the media (as a conduit to their fans) is part of the deal, then its part of the deal.
I agree with that, the problem is that the definition of "the media" no longer is exclusive to the three networks (ABC, NBC and CBS) along with a handful of newspaper outlets. "Media" today includes twitter, facebook and insta. The bottom line is that today's athletes probably make more money and PR on social media than the MSM. Also, the MSM was outraged until she invoked the "I am a victim of mental illness and depression" card and the media backed down like crazy.

this is just another death pang from the media. They are losing their grip and, hence, their revenue stream. This athlete no longer gives a shit about Sports Illustrated or ESPN. She, on purpose or by mistake, has elevated her brand by refusing to do media interviews. I never heard of her until this week and today, she is all over the news (however you define "news" today). She is Kardashianizing professional tennis.

You are right, she is simply a performer. But that performer can now align with and control her twitter feed to fame and fortune beyond the gating factor that the MSM is today. I am willing to bet that leBron James, Jacob deGrom, Rory McElroy and Patrick Mahomes are watching very, very closely.
 

LionDeNittany

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I agree with that, the problem is that the definition of "the media" no longer is exclusive to the three networks (ABC, NBC and CBS) along with a handful of newspaper outlets. "Media" today includes twitter, facebook and insta. The bottom line is that today's athletes probably make more money and PR on social media than the MSM. Also, the MSM was outraged until she invoked the "I am a victim of mental illness and depression" card and the media backed down like crazy.

this is just another death pang from the media. They are losing their grip and, hence, their revenue stream. This athlete no longer gives a shit about Sports Illustrated or ESPN. She, on purpose or by mistake, has elevated her brand by refusing to do media interviews. I never heard of her until this week and today, she is all over the news (however you define "news" today). She is Kardashianizing professional tennis.

You are right, she is simply a performer. But that performer can now align with and control her twitter feed to fame and fortune beyond the gating factor that the MSM is today. I am willing to bet that leBron James, Jacob deGrom, Rory McElroy and Patrick Mahomes are watching very, very closely.

I think you are way out in left field here.

The majors make money on two things... one, tv rights. Two tickets and concessions.

TV rights include post match interviews. Tv is the networks or a large TV conglomerate like Disney.

Nowhere in this does some make believe perception of traditional media losing their grip come in.

LdN
 

Obliviax

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I think you are way out in left field here.

The majors make money on two things... one, tv rights. Two tickets and concessions.

TV rights include post match interviews. Tv is the networks or a large TV conglomerate like Disney.

Nowhere in this does some make believe perception of traditional media losing their grip come in.

LdN
..and why should she care how the majors make money? All she cares about is how she makes money.

I've never heard of this woman in my life. I am not a tennis fan but will, occasionally, watch a major. She is now front page news and known to anyone who watches the six o'clock news. Her PR and "Q rating" is off the charts compared to two weeks ago. The "media" was doing her no favors. People will watch the french open is she des or does not do the interviews.
 
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Obliviax

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Because the topic is her declining press conferences while playing in majors.

She can stop playing tennis and do whatever she wants.

LdN
OK...honestly, even at the height, I wouldn't have cared if she did a post match interview. I doubt too many other people do either. Maybe they could have asked her what her views on the microeconomics of Brexit are? How strong her cat cut is set at? More than likely, they would have asked "how does it feel to win?" or "tell us your thoughts?" or "what did you think of the linesperson's out call in the second set?" She could respond "really, happy...relieved" and "I am just happy to be out there competing", "my opponent was so good, hats off to her...I fought through my adversity...this is an example to the kids out there....I had humble beginnings...I overcame an abusive relationship....make sure you see my Addidas logo and I am repping them for $10m per year...

The bottom line is that athletes are moving to own their own brand, their own PR. This is just another step in that direction. The team sports have player union contracts.

I am reminded of an athlete being fined $5,000 for showing up late to practice. He laid out $5k from his roll of cash to his coach and said "this is for today". he then laid out another $5k and said "and this is for the next time".

that is where we are.
 

LionDeNittany

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OK...honestly, even at the height, I wouldn't have cared if she did a post match interview. I doubt too many other people do either. Maybe they could have asked her what her views on the microeconomics of Brexit are? How strong her cat cut is set at? More than likely, they would have asked "how does it feel to win?" or "tell us your thoughts?" or "what did you think of the linesperson's out call in the second set?" She could respond "really, happy...relieved" and "I am just happy to be out there competing", "my opponent was so good, hats off to her...I fought through my adversity...this is an example to the kids out there....I had humble beginnings...I overcame an abusive relationship....make sure you see my Addidas logo and I am repping them for $10m per year...

The bottom line is that athletes are moving to own their own brand, their own PR. This is just another step in that direction. The team sports have player union contracts.

I am reminded of an athlete being fined $5,000 for showing up late to practice. He laid out $5k from his roll of cash to his coach and said "this is for today". he then laid out another $5k and said "and this is for the next time".

that is where we are.

That is all wonderful. But like demonstrated with Venus Williams' obnoxious comments yesterday, the press conferences are massive and produce more than the matches in many cases.

How many people saw Venus get stomped by some qualifier? Very few.

How many saw her comments? Probably 100 million.

LdN
 

Obliviax

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That is all wonderful. But like demonstrated with Venus Williams' obnoxious comments yesterday, the press conferences are massive and produce more than the matches in many cases.

How many people saw Venus get stomped by some qualifier? Very few.

How many saw her comments? Probably 100 million.

LdN
all good....kind of a cart and horse issue. Sport is the mechanism that makes them media stars but, at some point, the fact that they can hit a yellow ball better than anyone on the planet becomes secondary. Do they make more money winning events or from PR? At some point, it tips over. And how to keep focus on sport and not what outfit you've got to wear that day is interesting to me.

Regardless, my position is that the players don't need the MSM like they once used to. I didn't hear Venus' comments or hear of her game.
 

NJPSU

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I think you are way out in left field here.

The majors make money on two things... one, tv rights. Two tickets and concessions.

TV rights include post match interviews. Tv is the networks or a large TV conglomerate like Disney.

Nowhere in this does some make believe perception of traditional media losing their grip come in.

LdN
I was considering going to the White Out game against Auburn but only if Franklin does his post game press conference with the media. Also there's no way I'm watching the opener on TV against Wisconsin if Sean Clifford doesn't talk to Penn Live after the game. I mean if I can't hear the post game PC with Dave Jones what's the point of even watching the game?

(This is all tongue in cheek in case it wasn't obvious)
 
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Midnighter2

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I was considering going to the White Out game against Auburn but only if Franklin does his post game press conference with the media. Also there's no way I'm watching the opener on TV against Wisconsin if Sean Clifford doesn't talk to Penn Live after the game. I mean if I can't hear the post game PC with Dave Jones what's the point of even watching the game?

(This is all tongue in cheek in case it wasn't obvious)

If it were truly about getting interviews/insight after a match, you could have the press submit questions and have someone screen them for Osaka to answer (via statement or whatever). Some people like the press and messing with them; I mean, how many times did Lynch show up and do nothing only because he had to? And the press *still* asked him dumb questions. It’s about spectacle and creating controversy to sell papers; no one cares what Osaka was thinking when she hit a risky drop shot from the baseline down 40-15 in the third; they want to ask her about her anxiety, depression, Serena, etc.
 

NittanyChris

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SLUPSU

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all good....kind of a cart and horse issue. Sport is the mechanism that makes them media stars but, at some point, the fact that they can hit a yellow ball better than anyone on the planet becomes secondary. Do they make more money winning events or from PR? At some point, it tips over. And how to keep focus on sport and not what outfit you've got to wear that day is interesting to me.

Regardless, my position is that the players don't need the MSM like they once used to. I didn't hear Venus' comments or hear of her game.

You might be interested to know that Osaka is the highest-paid female athlete ever ($60 million one-year earnings, 55 million from endorsements).

 
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PSU Blue

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I just now checked for her 2020 earnings: $3.4m in winnings plus $34m in endorsements.
Agent get's 20% and tennis coach some percentage of winnings. But she earned her money. And tennis players have to pay for all their travel and hotels. She is essentially a sole proprietor.
 

lazydave841

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Do they make more money winning events or from PR?

You gotta win events enough in the first place for the PR to even matter. If the 257th ranked woman refused to interview, she'd probably have to borrow money to pay the fines and eventually find another revenue source.
 
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PSU Blue

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Generally speaking it’s their league or governing or sanctioning body of their sport. I can’t think of any professional sport where an individual athlete does not have a league, governing or sanctioning body.
It's the WTA and they don't do $hit for their players.
 

Obliviax

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You gotta win events enough in the first place for the PR to even matter. If the 257th ranked woman refused to interview, she'd probably have to borrow money to pay the fines and eventually find another revenue source.
agreed. I know people that speed because a traffic ticket is like pocket change to them.
 
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Obliviax

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If it were truly about getting interviews/insight after a match, you could have the press submit questions and have someone screen them for Osaka to answer (via statement or whatever). Some people like the press and messing with them; I mean, how many times did Lynch show up and do nothing only because he had to? And the press *still* asked him dumb questions. It’s about spectacle and creating controversy to sell papers; no one cares what Osaka was thinking when she hit a risky drop shot from the baseline down 40-15 in the third; they want to ask her about her anxiety, depression, Serena, etc.
totally agree and well stated. Really, and I don't know Osaka's personal details, but why put up with the Washington Post or SI when you can go strait to the public with tweets, Instagram, youtube and facebook? (assuming they don't deplatform you).

Change sucks for those who own power from the old constructs.
 
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PSU Blue

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You gotta win events enough in the first place for the PR to even matter. If the 257th ranked woman refused to interview, she'd probably have to borrow money to pay the fines and eventually find another revenue source.
They make tenfold more money from their endorsements, especially for the bonus of placing in an event. I worked in sports for 6 years with the 2nd largest tennis agency in the world.
 
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lazydave841

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They make tenfold more money from their endorsements, especially for the bonus of placing in an event. I worked in sports for 6 years with the 2nd largest tennis agency in the world.

How much endorsement money is the 257th ranked woman getting though?
 

NittPicker

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They make tenfold more money from their endorsements, especially for the bonus of placing in an event. I worked in sports for 6 years with the 2nd largest tennis agency in the world.
Federer is three years into a 10 year, $300 million deal with Uniqlo. Let that sink in. He'll retire before the deal expires and still be getting $30 million/year from that alone. Not bad for making a few commercials and wearing free clothes.
 

Midnighter2

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Barely anything, usually free accessories from Nike (or pick a sponsor). You really have to come from wealth to make in professional tennis.

Ehhhhh…..

williams-sistersgetty-c6ba78506ff75a40f5c89bd59cfb532b3ca02442.jpg
 

PSU Blue

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Ehhhhh…..

williams-sistersgetty-c6ba78506ff75a40f5c89bd59cfb532b3ca02442.jpg
Exception to the rule, they have freak-like genetics, good work ethic that their father fine tuned into cutting edge work ethic, a father that understood the system and found (with a little help) a superior coach at like 7. Much can be said the same of soccer, pay to play. But if you are a freak and someone finds you, the academies will pick up the bill. Most tennis players in Europe are from wealth, but I hear you on the Williams sisters. I met them in what used to be called The Lipton in Key Biscayne around 1999, very nice girls at the time.
 

Midnighter2

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Exception to the rule, they have freak-like genetics, good work ethic that their father fine tuned into cutting edge work ethic, a father that understood the system and found (with a little help) a superior coach at like 7. Much can be said the same of soccer, pay to play. But if you are a freak and someone finds you, the academies will pick up the bill. Most tennis papers in Europe are from wealth, but I hear you on the Williams sisters. I met the in what used to be called The Lipton in Key Biscayne around 1999, very nice girls at the time.

Lipton used to be one of my favorite tournaments - but, I get you about the 'cost' barrier for most to become 'elite' at tennis (best equipment, court time, lessons, tournament fees, etc.) - very similar to golf in that respect.

And interesting to note Naomi Osaka (and her older sister, also a pro tennis player) is basically a product of the Richard Williams path to pro tennis - her dad - a non-tennis player - coached his daughters on public courts until they were noticed after moving to Florida (Naomi at 15) and swept up by an academy.
 
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