More to ignore, Book 81.......

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Former President Trump tore into Fox News’ flagship morning program on Monday, lashing out at its hosts for their coverage of his polling as he eyes another run for president in 2024.

“Fox and Freinds] just really botched my poll numbers, no doubt on purpose,” Trump wrote in a post on Truth Social, the social network platforming he started after leaving office. “That show has been terrible— gone to the ‘dark side.’ They quickly quote the big Turning Point Poll victory of almost 60 points over the number two Republican, and then hammer me with outliers.”

Trump was referencing the network’s coverage of a new Turning Point USA poll, released on Sunday and showing the former president well ahead of every other potential Republican primary challenger.

“That is a little different than a couple of other polls we’ve seen over the past couple of weeks,” host Steve Doocy said, referencing other national polling that has shown Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) ahead of Trump in several age demographics. “So it’s like the young people who are activists at that [TPUSA] event like the former president, but looking at these other polls, different answer.”

Co-host Brian Kilmeade added “if you look state by state, Ron DeSantis is showing tremendous strength in New Hampshire, Michigan and Florida.”

Trump, in his comments blasting the network, referenced “RINO Paul Ryan,” who he called “one of the weakest and worst Speakers EVER,” and suggested the former congressman “must be running the place.”

Ryan sits on the board of Fox Corp., which is owned by Rupert Murdoch and operates Fox News Channel and its various other media properties.

Trump’s comments come as Murdoch-owned newspapers the New York Post and Wall Street Journal have criticized Trump, editorializing that he is unworthy of another stint in the White House, and failed as president during the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

While discussing the recent Jan. 6 hearings on Capitol Hill over which she has presided, Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), a frequent Trump foil, named checked Murdoch while she argued some conservative media might have soured on Trump.

During his time as president, Trump routinely touted Fox’s morning program, appearing live via phone often and live tweeting his thoughts on various segments.

Last week, Ainsley Earhardt, the show’s third co-host, said in reaction to news made by the Jan. 6 hearings that Congress should also probe the riots that broke out during protests for racial justice across the country during the summer of 2020.
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Former President Donald Trump was reluctant to give a speech on January 7, 2021, that strongly condemned the violence at the US Capitol the day before and crossed out key lines in a draft, according to a new video released by the House January 6 committee that includes interview footage and the draft document.

Democratic Rep. Elaine Luria of Virginia released the new video Monday on Twitter. The video includes clips of interviews with Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner and others stating that they believed Trump needed to make a statement on January 7.

"We felt like it was important to further call for de-escalation," said Kushner, who helped write the draft of the January 7 speech.

The video shows the draft with lines crossed out. Trump's daughter Ivanka, in an interview with the committee, identified handwriting on the document as her father's. On the draft, a line that said those who broke the law "belong in jail" was crossed out and someone wrote by hand "will pay."

According to the committee, other lines that were crossed out read: "I am directing the Department of Justice to ensure all lawbreakers are prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law. We must send a clear message not with mercy but with JUSTICE. Legal consequences must be swift and firm."

The other line crossed out referred to the rioters who stormed the Capitol: "I want it to be very clear you do not represent me."

When asked about why Trump wanted the lines crossed out, Kushner said: "I don't know."

Trump's former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone told the committee: "In my view, he needed to express very clearly that the people who committed violent acts, went into the Capitol, did what they did, should be prosecuted and should be arrested."

Trump's former director of the presidential personnel office, John McEntee, testified to the committee that Kushner had told him to help "nudge this along" if Trump asked about the January 7 speech.

"He knew since I'm always with him that, 'Hey, if he asks your opinion, you know, try to nudge this along. This will help cool everything down,'" McEntee said.

McEntee said he understood Trump to be reluctant to give the speech because of "the fact that somebody has to tell me to nudge it along."

Former Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson said she understood that the people around Trump believed he needed to make a statement on January 7, 2021, in order to quell talk of the 25th Amendment from being invoked.

"From what I understood at the time, and for what the reports were coming in, there was a large concern of 25th Amendment potentially being invoked, and there were concerns about what would happen in the Senate if the 25th was invoked." Hutchinson testified to the committee.

In addition to those feeling that Trump needed to do more to condemn the violence that occurred on January 6, Hutchinson said that some people in the White House were worried about what would happen to Trump in the final 15 days of his presidency if he didn't make a statement, and therefore needed this speech "as cover."

 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Google translation:Orcs are building a pontoon crossing in the area of the Daryevsky bridge over the Ingulets River in the Kherson region. The bridge itself was recently damaged as a result of the work of our fighters. Rashists seriously think that the pontoon crossing will help them.

 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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On CNN Monday, former Defense Secretary Mark Esper, a longtime member of the Trump administration, made clear he does not support his former boss and does not believe he should hold the presidency again.

A key reason, said Esper, is that he does not "put country first."

"You served during a tumultuous time in the Trump administration, you were fired in November, November 9th of 2020," said anchor Brianna Keilar. "As you're watching these January 6th hearings, what are you thinking?"

"Well, I wish I was able to see more of them, but like many Americans, I found myself stuck on airplanes or airports," said Esper. "Each hearing, as I read in the paper, the facts are startling. I've been saying, shocking but not surprising. It's an important service they were providing to recount what happened on January 6th and the days and weeks leading up to it. It's important for us to understand our history, and that there be accountability."

"You've said you won't vote for him again, you've urged others not to," said Keilar. "What's your biggest worry about what happens if President Trump is elected again?"

"Well, no, I won't support him," said Esper. "I've argued to my Republican colleagues that you can find the same type of conservative, traditional Republican policies but without — without all of the baggage, the coarseness and everything else because we need a Republican leader that cannot just unite the party but unite the country. My concern about Donald Trump trying to run for office again is he doesn't put country first and that's a problem for me, a major problem. I think he has to put country first, leaders need to lead and bring people together and he just doesn't have that capability."
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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The 'constitutional sheriff' movement used to be about guns. Now it's about election hoaxes
Hunter

One of the many, many, many reasons to fear for the safety of democracy in the United States is that there is something called a "constitutional sheriffs" movement, which continues not to be laughed out of existence despite all practitioners of the theory being absolute whackadoodles. The good news is that it's relatively small. The bad news is that, like every other conspiracy movement of the last few decades, it's now being folded into general-form Republicanism and, especially, the fascist wing of the party.
.........
The fascist think tank Claremont Institute, for example—the place that brought us the first attempted presidential coup in our nation's history—may currently be battling to restore its reputation after unleashing coup-plotter John Eastman on the country along with a host of fraudsters and the brazenly fascist Charlie Kirk, last year "launched a program to bring sheriffs to California for a week-long training on the Constitution and 'the Roots of Radical Leftist Ideology,'" The Washington Post just noted.


The New York Times now brings us a few photos and tidbits from this month's Las Vegas meetup of the so-called Constitutional Sheriffs and Peace Officers Association, headed by the notorious crackpot Richard Mack. The group hosted the election conspiracy theory-promoting Mike MyPillow Lindell, the "True the Vote" conspiracy peddlers, and a gaggle of the "constitutional" sheriffs currently getting themselves in trouble in their home states for using the power of their offices to "investigate" the fraud conspiracy that they cannot find but are certain exists.

What's new here, then, is that while the theory of "constitutional sheriffs" has been around for a while, propped up by anti-federal-government screwballs in the western states who continue to be furious that they can't personally annex whatever federal lands and resources they want to lay claim on. It's now a movement that is partnering tightly with other anti-democracy and pro-fascist groups to gain a bit of authority. It's shifted focus to become a movement specifically centered around 2020 fraud hoaxes, and is becoming part and parcel of that same MyPillow crowd. But, you know, with their own armories.

The Times has some quotes from election officials and others who actually have to deal with these crackpots, along with speculation on where this may be going next, now that both some of the sheriffs and a
lot of Republicans are mulling the use of deputies to "monitor" polling locations—a common tactic of the Jim Crow era. But as we watch this crackpot movement be steadily absorbed into what passes for mainstream Republicanism these days, here are a few things to keep in mind.
........
First, and I cannot emphasize this enough: This is a small movement of absolute crackpots with guns strapped to their hips. The entire premise of the constitutional sheriff "movement," as invented by Richard Mack and a bare handful of similar cranks, is that your county sheriff is the Ultimate Decider of American Law. Why? Because screw you, that's why. It's a theory based solely on a far-right need to deny federal government authority when it comes to (1) anything related to guns, or (2) most things related to cattle. After inhaling a lifetime of rangeland dust, this is the product those far-right brains produced.

The whole premise of the movement is that it is your local sheriff who decides what laws are and aren't constitutional. As a reminder, the United States’ three branches, which are co-equal, work like this: Congress can pass laws. The Executive Branch can write regulations. The Supreme Court can rule on the constitutionality of all of it.

And, under the “constitutional sheriff” theory, if your own local sheriff disagrees with any of that, they can just ... erase it, declaring that,
Actually, the Constitution says something different in Itchy Sand County, because sheriffs and only sheriffs have the power to tell everyone else in the United States government to go to hell. It's a theory so absurd and meritless that it is best equated to the old "sovereign citizen" idea, which asserts that any random citizen of the country can declare themselves an independent country and therefore doesn't have to pay taxes or obey speed limits anymore.

It is
bizarre. It is ridiculous. It's what you get when a sheriff decides they really liked the Bundy Ranch standoff—wherein a gaggle of local criminals organized an armed revolt against the federal workers tasked with evicting half-starved cattle from restricted federal rangeland—and thinks, “I should use my tiny morsel of public power to encourage other crooks to do this, too.” Richard Mack and the other adherents are laughable figures: incoherent bullshit artists obsessed with their own self-importance. For 10 years, this little movement got nowhere because even the rest of the American far-right was mostly embarrassed to be seen with them.

The "constitutional sheriff" movement is an offshoot of the far-right anti-government militia movement. It was founded from the start on not obeying
gun laws handed down by the federal government. That's the "constitutional" question each of the sheriffs around the country who ally with the movement all focus on; there's nobody in the group obsessed with a supposedly "constitutional" right to build a meth lab or smuggle fentanyl across state lines. Doesn't happen.

Nope, it's just anti-government, gun-stockpiling, unregulated militia whackjobs with badges.

It's also a movement of sheriffs who are ... how are we going to put this.....Not exceptionally bright? As one can imagine, these are people willing to reinterpret all of history and reality in order to come to the conclusion that
Actually, sheriffs outrank the entire United States government. They are people with inventive imaginations and no particular tether to reality. These are the precise sorts of gullibles who are predisposed to other baseless, outlandish, and dangerous conspiracy theories, and it should be completely unsurprising that those who have associated themselves with far-right militia hokum also fell hook, line, and sinker for whatever fraud claims Rudy Giuliani, Sidney Powell, or other hoax-promoters burped out on tv.

Italian satellites? Bamboo ballots? Sure. Once you've convinced yourself you're the decider of all laws, it only stands to reason that, uh, Italy would be using any means at their disposal to take that away from you.

But the other thing to remember about the new "constitutional sheriff" shift into election conspiracy theories rather than gun fetishes is that it's predictably racist. Yes, as stunning as this news is, we shall try to absorb it: It turns out that far-right conservative sheriffs might be a
little bit racist. The reveal is in plain sight: All of these conspiracy theories are proposed by other racists to explain why the votes in not-conservative American cities should be treated as fraudulent, but all the votes for Trump in their own rural counties are surely legitimate.

"Some sheriffs from rural Trump-voting counties said they hadn’t observed major problems to fix in their own counties, but supported more sheriff involvement overall," reports the Times.

Hmm. Go on.

"Richard Vaughn, a sheriff in rural Grayson County in Virginia, said he wanted officers to be involved in observing vote counts, and would support election investigations 'in areas where there are allegations.' 'A lot of people are losing confidence,' he added."

Ah. Areas where there are "allegations." And where are those areas? Well, the Trump team spelled that out pretty clearly in their various bullshit lawsuits. The areas with "allegations" are Democratic-voting cities in swing states, places like Detroit and Philadelphia. Cities with a lot of Black Democrats were deemed suspicious solely because they voted against Trump in very large numbers. If Trump's clan of hoax-inventors wanted to overturn the election results in those states, they needed to invent reasons to explain how those votes, specifically, were the "suspicious" ones.

Yeah, this is a whole lot of ick. But this little constitutional sheriff movement has evolved from a formerly mockable gaggle of gun-toting, pro-militia, office-holding weirdos to, well, the exact same thing—but now focused on promoting election hoaxes alongside Captain MyPillow and various fascism-promoting think tanks and activist groups.

It's like the QAnon movement: The Trump years have seen every group of far-right conspiracy-minded , conspiracy theorists, the professionally paranoid, the aspirationally paranoid—all of them have coalesced into one big ball of hostile delusion. The collapse of conservative ideology, after too many failures in a row, left the Republican base disillusioned and looking for enemies to blame. And, lo and behold, the enemies turned out to be absolutely everybody who isn't them.
 
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Ten Thousan Marbles

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A Pennsylvania man who had pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has died by suicide.

Mark Roderick Aungst, 47, of South Williamsport, died on Wednesday. Lycoming County coroner Charles E. Kiessling, Jr., confirmed Aungst’s death to Law&Crime.

Court filings show that Aungst had pleaded guilty in June to one count of parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building, a misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in jail and a $5,000 fine. He had come to Washington on a chartered bus from Pennsylvania to the Capitol in order to attend Donald Trump’s so-called “Stop the Steal” rally.

Aungst and his co-defendant, Tammy Bronsburg, admitted to entering the building at around 2:45 p.m., some 30 minutes after the initial breach, and leaving 30 seconds later. They re-entered the building at around 3:05 p.m. and spent about 10 minutes inside, taking pictures and video. They encountered law enforcement and were told to leave. Neither had been accused of assault or property destruction.

Aungst’s plea agreement did not contemplate a sentence range, but many Jan. 6 defendants who have pleaded guilty to this charge have received sentences significantly below the statutory maximum.

His sentencing was set for Sept. 27.

Bronsburg has also pleaded guilty to the parading and picketing charge. Her sentencing is set for the same September date.

Aungst, a gas field well service technician, is survived by his mother, a daughter and three siblings, PennLive reported.

His lawyer did not immediately respond to Law&Crime’s request for comment.

Aungst’s death is believed to be the third suicide among Jan. 6 defendants. Christopher Stanton Georgia, 53, of Fulton County, Georgia, died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound days after the Capitol siege. He had been charged with unlawful entry, a misdemeanor. Matthew Perna, 37, apparently died by suicide in February, weeks ahead of his sentencing on felony obstruction and other charges to which he had pleaded guilty.

Perna’s co-defendant, Stephen Michael Ayres, 39, has also pleaded guilty. He testified earlier this month before the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack.........


 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Pence’s former chief of staff appeared before a federal grand jury investigating Jan. 6
Rebekah Sager

GettyImages-932900788.jpg

Marc Short, Vice Pence's former chief of staff

Just when you thought the House Select committee investigating Jan. 6 wasn’t getting testimony from the A++ players in the White House… think again.

ABC News reports that Marc Short, former Vice President Mike Pence’s chief of staff, was caught by an ABC News camera leaving the D.C. District Court Friday with his attorney, Emmet Flood, beside him. He had reportedly appeared before a federal grand jury investigating the insurrection on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Sources told ABC News that Short appeared under subpoena.

Short would be the highest-ranking official from the White House under former President Donald Trump to appear before the grand jury.
......
During the last public hearings from the House Select committee on July 21, an unnamed White House security official testified that during the Jan. 6 attack, Pence’s security detail was calling their families to “say goodbye.”

“The members of the VP detail at this time were starting to fear for their own lives,” the security official testified. “There was a lot of yelling. There was a lot of very personal calls over the radio. It was disturbing. I don’t like talking about it. There were calls to say goodbye to family members.”



The public hearing additionally revealed that while Pence’s security team was planning his escape, Trump was tweeting about Pence’s lack of “courage” to follow the former president’s request and stop the electoral count.

As Daily Kos’ Brandi Buchman reports, in the days and hours leading up to and during the insurrection, Trump badgered, berated, and bullied Pence to get him to stop the electoral count.

The vice president did not follow Trump’s edicts, and while the president did nothing to quell the violence on Jan. 6., Pence ordered deployments to help quash it.

As the public hearings revealed, at the end of a day that left countless law enforcement and others injured or dead, the nation bruised and scared, Congress running for their lives, and a gallows erected for his vice president, all Trump could muster were the words: "Mike Pence let me down.”
 

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