More to ignore, Book 71.......

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Thursday, Jun 23, 2022 · 3:58:02 PM EDT · April Siese
Rep. Scott Perry made it clear that he wanted Clark to take over as acting AG, praising the Justice Department official in an interview.

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Ten Thousan Marbles

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Thursday, Jun 23, 2022 · 4:40:45 PM EDT · Brandi Buchman
Former head of OLC Richard Engel testified Thursday that after he reviewed the rules around appointing a special counsel to investigate Trump’s fraud claims he realized it was not feasible nor legal.

Barr gave a press conference announcing as much, saying publicly that the DOJ would not appoint a special counsel.

Trump, in response, tweets that there should be a special counsel appointed.

 

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Thursday, Jun 23, 2022 · 5:12:16 PM EDT · April Siese
During Donoghue’s testimony, the former acting deputy AG admitted that appointing Clark would cause him to resign immediately, as would Engel. The Justice Department held no confidence in Clark’s abilities and Donoghue communicated as much, recalling that he told Trump the then-president would be faced with mass resignations. Trump relented and chose not to install Clark as acting AG but did not fire Clark from his position in the Justice Department.
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Thursday, Jun 23, 2022 · 5:15:49 PM EDT · April Siese

Rep. Brooks requested numerous pardons for lawmakers willing to go along with Trump’s Big Lie plan, namely every elected official who rejected the results in Pennsylvania and Arizona.

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Ten Thousan Marbles

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Back of Bourke
Jun 23, 2022 at 05:42:12 PM

Cheney:

“It can be difficult to accept that President Trump abused your trust, that he deceived you”

That’s the gist of it. That treasonous **** Trump could give a rat’s ass about the people he has conned, especially the MAGA base he bilks for dollars. They should direct their sense of victimhood and anger at the true culprits: Trump and the Republican officeholders up and down the ballot who participated — and continue to participate — in the con and seditious Big Lie. They have been had, big time.
 

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DOJ moves on multiple fronts as FBI hands out subpoenas and searches home of Jeffrey Clark
Mark Sumner

On Wednesday, the FBI handed subpoenas to an unknown number of people who took part in the Jan. 6 conspiracy as false electors. Subpoenas are reported to have gone out to members of the Republican Party in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, New Mexico, and Nevada. In addition, federal agents seized evidence, including the phone of the Republican Party chair in Nevada.

Finally, rightwing “think tank” The Center for Renewing America confirmed that “more than a dozen DOJ law enforcement officials” searched the home of former Justice Department (DOJ) official Jeffrey Clark on Wednesday.

Clark’s part in the Jan. 6 conspiracy was supplemental to the role of the false electors, whose assigned task was to create an excuse for throwing out the electoral votes in seven states, as part of the scheme created by Donald Trump and attorney John Eastman. Clark, an environmental lawyer several levels down at the DOJ at the time, proposed that Trump remove then-acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and replace him with the completely unqualified Clark. Clark then promised to throw the weight of the DOJ behind false claims of voter fraud, giving Trump room to refuse to leave office and to call for new elections.

Now Clark is being investigated by the people who know exactly what he did and who he is—his former colleagues at the DOJ.
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Clark’s new employers in the Republican welfare program at The Center for Renewing America rushed to claim that the raid on Clark’s home consisted of “criminalizing politics” because all Clark wanted was “to investigate voter fraud.” Which is a good example of walking as far from the truth as is possible.

The truth is that Clark saw Trump’s desperation to get the DOJ to sign on to the conspiracy, and how frustrated Trump was that Rosen refused to play ball. So Clark offered Trump an absolutely classic “you wash my hands, and I’ll wash yours” arrangement whereby Clark would fly multiple tiers upward to land in the AG role and Trump would get a statement claiming the DOJ was investigating significant voter fraud.

To support this idea, Clark focused on Georgia and both he and Trump pressured then U.S. attorney Byung Pak to back their play. Clark went so far as to pre-draft a letter falsely saying the DOJ was investigating significant voter fraud in Georgia. At one point, Clark was so confident that Trump was about to pull the trigger, that he graciously offered to allow Rosen to hang around as his second in command.

The only thing that stopped Trump from executing this scheme and replacing Rosen with Clark was the timely release of a public statement from Georgia Sec. of State Brad Raffensperger. Having been badgered and threatened by Trump, Raffensperger went public. Word of what Trump and Clark had been planning spread around the DOJ, and multiple senior officials at the department made it clear they would resign rather than go along. In the end, Rosen confronted Trump directly. Trump backed down.

As House select committee on Jan. 6 chair Rep. Bennie Thompson said during Thursday’s hearing, Trump tried to use the DOJ to back his scheme. "Donald Trump didn't just want the Justice Department to investigate,” said Thompson. “He wanted the Justice Department to help legitimize his lies, to baselessly call the election corrupt.”

Whether Clark was subpoenaed to testify or produce information isn’t known. However, among those who did receive a subpoena on Wednesday was Georgia Republican Party chair David Shafer. Shafer reportedly played a central role in organizing the false elector effort in Georgia.
 

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Multiple Republican Congressmen asked Trump for a pardon for their actions leading up to Jan. 6
Dartagnan

Breaking from the Washington Post’s Rosalind Helderman (and highlighted in Brandi Buchman’s LiveBlog and summary of the Jan. 6 hearings), a trenchant commentary about the craven state of the Republican Party’s representatives in the United States Congress:

Multiple Republican members of Congress asked White House officials if President Donald Trump would preemptively pardon them for their activities in the lead-up to Jan. 6 before he left office, testimony provided by Trump White House aides to the Jan. 6 committee shows.
The members included Reps. Matt Gaetz (Fla.), Mo Brooks (Ala.), Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Louie Gohmert (Tex.) and Scott Perry (Pa.), the testimony showed.

The testimony regarding these seditionists’ efforts to inoculate themselves against the consequences for what they clearly understood were potentially criminal acts came from Cassidy Hutchinson, an aide to Trump’s Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, and Trump aide John McEntee.

According to the article, Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene reportedly asked for a pardon as well, but Hutchinson could not verify that as she hadn’t taken the call. Perry has denied ever requesting a pardon, so he’s either lying or Hutchinson is. Of course, Hutchinson has absolutely no reason to lie about such a thing, whereas Perry has every reason in the world..

We’ve all heard about “the pardon list” from John Eastman, one of the prime architects of the seditious scheme to overturn the election results, who asked to be included on it, but no one seems to have actually produced a copy of what must certainly be a fascinating document. As the Post’s Aaron Blake explains:


That suggests that the plotters weighed the possible need for pardons in some considerable measure — that those who led the effort to overturn the election believed they might have enough legal liability that they floated the extraordinary step of obtaining rare, preemptive presidential pardons.
It appears to be the first time we’ve seen firm evidence of such a request. And while by itself it doesn’t constitute an admission of guilt, it fills out a fast-crystallizing picture that those involved in the plot knew that what they were doing was, at the very least, potentially illegal.
[***]

We still don’t know how extensive the pardon deliberations were. But what we do know — based on early reporting and on the evidence Thursday — is that people were pretty scared that what they had done could come back to bite them.

Or, as Republican Adam Kinzinger laconically explained:

“The only reason I know to ask for a pardon because you think you’ve committed a crime,” Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) said.

After a fashion, the sheer sordid criminality of this brazen venture to illegally disenfranchise over half of the American electorate is nothing short of mind-boggling.

None of these people belong in government. Many clearly don’t belong on our streets, either.