Lots of issues facing EVs.......

SLUPSU

Well-Known Member
Aug 5, 2018
4,553
2,623
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Still waiting for specific subsidies for fossil fuels....🤷🏼‍♀️
Here's a sampling of tax breaks, how many of these have been around 100+ years?

Deduction for Intangible Drilling Costs – 100% tax deduction for costs not directly part of the final operating of an oil or gas well

Last-In, First-Out (LIFO) Accounting for Fossil Fuel Companies – allows companies to undervalue their inventory, reducing taxable income; oil and gas companies account for over one-third of LIFO benefits

Corporate Tax Exemption for Fossil Fuel Master Limited Partnerships – allows companies to pay zero corporate income tax

Excess of Percentage Over Cost Depletion – independent producers can deduct a percentage of gross income from production, rather than reflecting the value of the reserve depleted

Lost Royalties on Offshore Drilling for Leases Issued from 1996 through 2000 (Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act)

Domestic Manufacturing Deduction for Oil & Gas – allows oil & gas producers to claim a tax break intended for the manufacturing of goods

Dual Capacity Taxpayer Deduction – allows oil and gas companies operating abroad to deduct royalty payments to foreign governments from U.S. income taxes

BP Deduction for Oil Spill Legal Settlement – BP was allowed to deduct the vast majority of damages paid to the U.S. government under the spill settlement

Inland Waterways Transport for Petroleum – reflects the tonnage of oil shipped in proportion to operations, maintenance, and construction costs not covered by user fees

Petroleum Reserves – Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, and Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve; the subsidy is due to the public provision of the reserves, rather than requiring the private sector to build and maintain stockpiles

Accelerated Depreciation of Natural Gas Distribution Pipelines – pipelines treated as 15-year property; allows companies to deduct higher levels of depreciation costs upfront

Reduced Government Take from Onshore Federal Oil & Gas Leasing – the onshore royalty rate is significantly lower than the primary royalty rate for offshore federal waters

Inadequate Administrative Fees for Onshore Drilling Management – Bureau of Land Management costs associated with drilling are covered by taxpayers instead of industry

Powder River Basin Coal Lease Subsidy – coal companies lease federal land at below-market values, leading to lost bonus payments and royalties

Fossil Energy Research & Development – supports carbon capture and storage, coal fuels, and unconventional oil and gas

Amortization Period for Coal Pollution Control – allows coal-fired facilities to deduct greater levels of pollution control costs

Inadequate Industry Fees for the Abandoned Mine Land Grant Funds – reflects U.S. Treasury contributions required to cover administration of the fund and shortfalls

inadequate Industry Fees for the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund – reflects U.S. Treasury contributions required to cover administration of the fund and shortfalls

Powder River Basin Insufficient Bonding – reduced cost of capital from self-bonding for mine closure and reclamation liabilities

Inland Waterways Transport for Coal – reflects the tonnage of coal shipped in proportion to operations, maintenance, and construction costs not covered by user fees

Excess of Percentage Over Cost Depletion – allows companies to deduct a percentage of gross income from production, rather than reflecting the value of the reserve depleted

You happy now?
 

rumble_lion

Well-Known Member
Aug 7, 2011
22,616
5,461
1
It’s actually been a cool august. Hey, no hurricanes yet!

Yep.

The two-month-long stretch of hot weather baking large swaths of China is, all things considered, the world’s most extreme heat wave on record, one climatologist argues.​
The country has kept national weather records since 1961, and this summer’s hot spell marks the longest continuous period of high temperatures that southern China has seen since then, Agence France-Presse reported Thursday.​
Climatologist and weather historian Maximiliano Herrera believes that when all factors are taken into account, it’s the most severe heat wave recorded anywhere.​
“This combines the most extreme intensity with the most extreme length with an incredibly huge area all at the same time,” Herrera told New Scientist on Tuesday. “There is nothing in world climatic history which is even minimally comparable to what is happening in China.”​
From the nation’s Sichuan province in the southwest to Jiangsu on the eastern coast, temperatures have routinely surpassed 104 degrees Fahrenheit, The New York Times reported earlier this month. On at least one day, the temperature in Chongqing municipality hit 113 degrees.​
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
108,051
57,666
1
Yep.

The two-month-long stretch of hot weather baking large swaths of China is, all things considered, the world’s most extreme heat wave on record, one climatologist argues.​
The country has kept national weather records since 1961, and this summer’s hot spell marks the longest continuous period of high temperatures that southern China has seen since then, Agence France-Presse reported Thursday.​
Climatologist and weather historian Maximiliano Herrera believes that when all factors are taken into account, it’s the most severe heat wave recorded anywhere.​
“This combines the most extreme intensity with the most extreme length with an incredibly huge area all at the same time,” Herrera told New Scientist on Tuesday. “There is nothing in world climatic history which is even minimally comparable to what is happening in China.”​
From the nation’s Sichuan province in the southwest to Jiangsu on the eastern coast, temperatures have routinely surpassed 104 degrees Fahrenheit, The New York Times reported earlier this month. On at least one day, the temperature in Chongqing municipality hit 113 degrees.​
What was the weather in Tajikistan?
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
108,051
57,666
1
here is a great point from Squakbox. The EU's crazy energy policies are actually BAD for the environment. Why? Because the largest producers of energy in the EU produce very clean energy. But shutting them down, most of the natgas, that burden shifts to Russia and China who make much dirtier energy.

Nice hustle!