Look to Golf for answers to NIL

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
The short and easy answer to control NIL without lawsuits is found right in the Rules of Golf........

A golfer who receives more than $1000 for services or winnings related to golf skill is no longer an amateur and is now considered a professional and may no longer compete is amateur golf events.

All the NCAA needs to do is declare a hard cap on NIL payments for athletes to maintain amateur status. Athletes making in excess of "$65,000" (pick a number) annually based on their athletic skill will no longer be considered "amateur athletes" thus making themselves ineligible to compete in NCAA athletics.

At this point the player is welcome to take as much NIL money as they want.....However at that point they have no more value to their respective university because they wouldn't be eligible to play anymore as an amateur athlete.

Done!
 

bourbon n blues

Well-Known Member
Nov 20, 2019
20,421
23,507
1
The short and easy answer to control NIL without lawsuits is found right in the Rules of Golf........

A golfer who receives more than $1000 for services or winnings related to golf skill is no longer an amateur and is now considered a professional and may no longer compete is amateur golf events.

All the NCAA needs to do is declare a hard cap on NIL payments for athletes to maintain amateur status. Athletes making in excess of "$65,000" (pick a number) annually based on their athletic skill will no longer be considered "amateur athletes" thus making themselves ineligible to compete in NCAA athletics.

At this point the player is welcome to take as much NIL money as they want.....However at that point they have no more value to their respective university because they wouldn't be eligible to play anymore as an amateur athlete.

Done!
It’ll never pass. Look at the Olympics .
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
The short and easy answer to control NIL without lawsuits is found right in the Rules of Golf........

A golfer who receives more than $1000 for services or winnings related to golf skill is no longer an amateur and is now considered a professional and may no longer compete is amateur golf events.

All the NCAA needs to do is declare a hard cap on NIL payments for athletes to maintain amateur status. Athletes making in excess of "$65,000" (pick a number) annually based on their athletic skill will no longer be considered "amateur athletes" thus making themselves ineligible to compete in NCAA athletics.

At this point the player is welcome to take as much NIL money as they want.....However at that point they have no more value to their respective university because they wouldn't be eligible to play anymore as an amateur athlete.

Done!
Lots to unpack here. Golf is simply a collection of tournaments loosely sewn together. It isn't a league with team owners or college sponsors. There is an event, players show up and play for the money. They get paid, for all intents and purposes, nothing if they don't win. Then they have personal contracts with sponsors and appearances. The players can play or not play. They can go on other tours and make competitive money. They have options.

Plus, golf isn't a team sport.

If you are 18 and feel you have a path to pro-ball, the only real path is through the NCAA (with few exceptions). The NCAA is a cabal with no input or power by the players even though the colleges own your rights (up until the portal).

There is only one path here. And this is where Emerett really screwed up. The players need a union or some kind of association. Here they can negotiate a collective bargaining agreement. The idea is that everyone participates and does better, not just the elite QBs and WRs. The QBs and WRs will get voted down, in mass, and the rest of the players will vote to make money. The vast majority of college players (OL, DL, LB, second stringers, special teamers) are making nothing. The idea is to let them unionize and then negotiate a CBA with the players union where there is structure and fairness up and down the line (colleges, players, coaches, etc.).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Plan Ahaed

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
Lots to unpack here. Golf is simply a collection of tournaments loosely sewn together. It isn't a league with team owners or college sponsors. There is an event, players show up and play for the money. They get paid, for all intents and purposes, nothing if they don't win. Then they have personal contracts with sponsors and appearances. The players can play or not play. They can go on other tours and make competitive money. They have options.

Plus, golf isn't a team sport.

If you are 18 and feel you have a path to pro-ball, the only real path is through the NCAA (with few exceptions). The NCAA is a cabal with no input or power by the players even though the colleges own your rights (up until the portal).

There is only one path here. And this is where Emerett really screwed up. The players need a union or some kind of association. Here they can negotiate a collective bargaining agreement. The idea is that everyone participates and does better, not just the elite QBs and WRs. The QBs and WRs will get voted down, in mass, and the rest of the players will vote to make money. The vast majority of college players (OL, DL, LB, second stringers, special teamers) are making nothing. The idea is to let them unionize and then negotiate a CBA with the players union where there is structure and fairness up and down the line (colleges, players, coaches, etc.).
Not really.

The Rules of Golf determine if a player is an amateur or professional based on organizational affiliations or taking money for golf skill above that of $1000. It has nothing to do with competitions. However, you can become a professional by simply accepting too much money at a golf competition. If you've ever won the big cash calcutta at your club, your technically a professional golfer, whether you know it or not. These are facts, nothing is arbitrary about anything I said in this thread. You can reach out to Golf House if you'd like to confirm this. They will answer the phone and give the exact same answer.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
Not really.

The Rules of Golf determine if a player is an amateur or professional based on organizational affiliations or taking money for golf skill above that of $1000. It has nothing to do with competitions. However, you can become a professional by simply accepting too much money at a golf competition. If you've ever won the big cash calcutta at your club, your technically a professional golfer, whether you know it or not. These are facts, nothing is arbitrary about anything I said in this thread. You can reach out to Golf House if you'd like to confirm this. They will answer the phone and give the exact same answer.
it has to do with the structure of ownership, collective bargaining, antitrust laws and employee rights. If you want an eyeful, study the O'Bannon case against the NCAA. Or the Curt Flood Act of 1998. Sport Illustrated cover of the Flood case stated "It's not just a flood, by a deluge." It declared that teams owning the rights to players was a violation of antitrust laws. So when a player played to the end of his contract, he was a free agent. This gave the players a TON of negotiating power. The Unions negotiated collective bargaining agreements to give the leagues structure. It is based on the balance of what is good for owners as well as players.

If the NCAA does anything, they will lose in court until the players unionize and negotiate rules of engagement.
 

bvillebaron

Well-Known Member
Feb 4, 2004
3,574
3,756
1
The short and easy answer to control NIL without lawsuits is found right in the Rules of Golf........

A golfer who receives more than $1000 for services or winnings related to golf skill is no longer an amateur and is now considered a professional and may no longer compete is amateur golf events.

All the NCAA needs to do is declare a hard cap on NIL payments for athletes to maintain amateur status. Athletes making in excess of "$65,000" (pick a number) annually based on their athletic skill will no longer be considered "amateur athletes" thus making themselves ineligible to compete in NCAA athletics.

At this point the player is welcome to take as much NIL money as they want.....However at that point they have no more value to their respective university because they wouldn't be eligible to play anymore as an amateur athlete.

Done!
Sorry but that ship has sailed long ago.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
it has to do with the structure of ownership, collective bargaining, antitrust laws and employee rights. If you want an eyeful, study the O'Bannon case against the NCAA. Or the Curt Flood Act of 1998. Sport Illustrated cover of the Flood case stated "It's not just a flood, by a deluge." It declared that teams owning the rights to players was a violation of antitrust laws. So when a player played to the end of his contract, he was a free agent. This gave the players a TON of negotiating power. The Unions negotiated collective bargaining agreements to give the leagues structure. It is based on the balance of what is good for owners as well as players.

If the NCAA does anything, they will lose in court until the players unionize and negotiate rules of engagement.
In golf anyone can take whatever they want in compensation. What they take determines their status as an amateur or professional. Which in turn affects the events they are eligible for. If the top amateur in the world accepts $1001 related to his golf skill, he now a professional, whether he wants to be or not.
If you win the US Amateur you get an invite to the Masters. If you turn pro between the time you win the US Am and the start of the Masters they will rescind the invitation....FACT. The invitation is based on remaining an amateur.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
If the NCAA does anything, they will lose in court until the players unionize and negotiate rules of engagement.
The NCAA is free to determine their definition of an amateur athlete for eligibility in NCAA sanctioned events.
Per the current bylaws, professional athletes are not permitted to participate in NCAA governed events.
The item is question here is determining what the governing organization defines as amateur and professional, which is well within their right to do, as they have already done.
Now if they do put a hard cap on compensation for skill, it does however open up the field for other leagues, kinda like the Saudi Greg Norman Golf Tour thing they are trying. If the NCAA would hard cap, a minor league football and hoops league might be just around the corner, but make no mistake the NCAA can legally set parameters for participant eligibility.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
In golf anyone can take whatever they want in compensation. What they take determines their status as an amateur or professional. Which in turn affects the events they are eligible for. If the top amateur in the world accepts $1001 related to his golf skill, he now a professional, whether he wants to be or not.
If you win the US Amateur you get an invite to the Masters. If you turn pro between the time you win the US Am and the start of the Masters they will rescind the invitation....FACT. The invitation is based on remaining an amateur.
how does that solve any college problems? The NFL collective bargaining agreement restricts entry until your senior HS class is out of school for three years.

Colleges cannot collude to not play a "pro" without breaking laws. It is antitrust.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
how does that solve any college problems? The NFL collective bargaining agreement restricts entry until your senior HS class is out of school for three years.

Colleges cannot collude to not play a "pro" without breaking laws. It is antitrust.
Antitrust would involve limiting ones access to free market payments. Setting a hard cap doesn't do that, they are still free to take whatever they want, however exceeding limits would affect status which would affect eligibility. Golf has been doing it for a hundred years. They just raised the $750 minimum in credit only to up to $1000 in cash a year or two ago. Take over $1000 and you're a pro, whether you like it or not.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
Look man, I'm not making opinions here, I'm stating facts.
The NCAA already doesn't allow professional players, they just need to modernize their definition of it like the USGA and R&A did in 2019.
Seriously, call USGA Golf House in Far Hills and ask for the Rules department. They will answer and explain everything to you with regard to the items of this thread.
 

PSU_Nut

Well-Known Member
May 29, 2001
17,550
3,492
1
The short and easy answer to control NIL without lawsuits is found right in the Rules of Golf........

A golfer who receives more than $1000 for services or winnings related to golf skill is no longer an amateur and is now considered a professional and may no longer compete is amateur golf events.

All the NCAA needs to do is declare a hard cap on NIL payments for athletes to maintain amateur status. Athletes making in excess of "$65,000" (pick a number) annually based on their athletic skill will no longer be considered "amateur athletes" thus making themselves ineligible to compete in NCAA athletics.

At this point the player is welcome to take as much NIL money as they want.....However at that point they have no more value to their respective university because they wouldn't be eligible to play anymore as an amateur athlete.

Done!
IF the supreme court has already ruled they can not block players rights to receive NIL money how do you think your work around will hold up in court? In the end it will just cost the NCAA lawyers fees and be right back to where they were.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
IF the supreme court has already ruled they can not block players rights to receive NIL money how do you think your work around will hold up in court? In the end it will just cost the NCAA lawyers fees and be right back to where they were.
Organizations are free to determine who is eligible for their competitions. It why Phil Mickelson and Phil Helmuth aren't eligible to play in the US amateur. One gets tons of money for his golf skill the other plays golf publicly for money other than his own, regardless of his ability.
Its also why Aaron Rodgers can't play qb for Cal Berkley next season.
Nobody is saying you can't take all the money you want from NIL but taking certain amounts may affect your eligibility.
It's literally the reason top amateur golf events like the Porter Cup or Sunnehanna Amateur pay a high number of $1000 pro shop credit to the winner. Anything more would affect the players future eligibility.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
Look man, I'm not making opinions here, I'm stating facts.
The NCAA already doesn't allow professional players, they just need to modernize their definition of it like the USGA and R&A did in 2019.
Seriously, call USGA Golf House in Far Hills and ask for the Rules department. They will answer and explain everything to you with regard to the items of this thread.
two totally different situations between the NCAA and Pro Golf. NIL does not make you a professional player. The player is not being paid by the NCAA, they are being paid for NIL by some company. If the NCAA does anything, they will be sued and found in violation of antitrust laws. there really is only one option and that is for the players to unite (unionize) and get a collective bargaining agreement. The differences are nuanced by profound.

Another good case to study is Jeremy Bloom vs the NCAA. (his sister had a movie made about her named "Molly's Game"). Jeremy was a CB for the U of Colorado and also an Olympic Class Mogul skier. He made money off of his Olympic ski career and the NCAA barred him from playing. The NCAA would clearly lose that case today.

This gets really complex. You have to understand sports law. I was fortunate to attend a sports law symposium at Harvard several years ago. Coming from that, I posted on brain injuries (CTE) and told people it was going to create a massive change. Also, at that time, was NIL. The deal is you have to distinguish between what is an employee and what is a free lancer. If you are an employee then decades of employment law are brought to bear.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
IF the supreme court has already ruled they can not block players rights to receive NIL money how do you think your work around will hold up in court? In the end it will just cost the NCAA lawyers fees and be right back to where

two totally different situations between the NCAA and Pro Golf. NIL does not make you a professional player. The player is not being paid by the NCAA, they are being paid for NIL by some company. If the NCAA does anything, they will be sued and found in violation of antitrust laws. there really is only one option and that is for the players to unite (unionize) and get a collective bargaining agreement. The differences are nuanced by profound.

Another good case to study is Jeremy Bloom vs the NCAA. (his sister had a movie made about her named "Molly's Game"). Jeremy was a CB for the U of Colorado and also an Olympic Class Mogul skier. He made money off of his Olympic ski career and the NCAA barred him from playing. The NCAA would clearly lose that case today.

This gets really complex. You have to understand sports law. I was fortunate to attend a sports law symposium at Harvard several years ago. Coming from that, I posted on brain injuries (CTE) and told people it was going to create a massive change. Also, at that time, was NIL. The deal is you have to distinguish between what is an employee and what is a free lancer. If you are an employee then decades of employment law are brought to bear.
Your missing it all. We aren't talking about pro golf, we are talking about the the rules of amateur status which is it's own section of the Rules of Golf.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
Your missing it all. We aren't talking about pro golf, we are talking about the the rules of amateur status which is it's own section of the Rules of Golf.
The Rules of Amateur status in golf are significantly vetted by expert sports lawyers. In fact the USGA executive committee typically has multiple lawyers on it at any one time. NCAA needs to review its policy on the definition of amateur status, which would impact who and what is eligible for its sanctioned competitions.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
Any amateur in the world is free to accept a 25k contract with Callaway and 10k in tournament winnings, however they will not be eligible for the US Amateur Championship anymore.
There is nothing anti-trust about that scenario and this is the model that the NCAA needs to mould.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
The Rules of Amateur status in golf are significantly vetted by expert sports lawyers. In fact the USGA executive committee typically has multiple lawyers on it at any one time. NCAA needs to review its policy on the definition of amateur status, which would impact who and what is eligible for its sanctioned come

Any amateur in the world is free to accept a 25k contract with Callaway and 10k in tournament winnings, however they will not be eligible for the US Amateur Championship anymore.
There is nothing anti-trust about that scenario and this is the model that the NCAA needs to mould.
OK. I am out.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
There is nothing to argue here. I'm just stating facts about how Golf in general operates with regard to eligibility and how the NCAA should be exploring this type of model. Which is heavily vetted and has been in used for many, many, years.
I am simply stating that you are comparing apples to donuts. But that's ok, that is what these boards are for.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bourbon n blues

bourbon n blues

Well-Known Member
Nov 20, 2019
20,421
23,507
1
There is nothing to argue here. I'm just stating facts about how Golf in general operates with regard to eligibility and how the NCAA should be exploring this type of model. Which is heavily vetted and has been in used for many, many, years.
I understand that, but deals have been signed, do you seriously think the players wouldn't sue over that? Potentially you might say any deals over the total cost of your schooling, tuition, room , and board must go towards paying back your scholarship and associated fees.
If PSU costs $50,000 per year for example any money after that pays back the university. After they are paid back you keep it.
I'm not sure how the IRS will look at scholarships now, but do not get surprised if they consider it taxable at some point.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
I understand that, but deals have been signed, do you seriously think the players wouldn't sue over that? Potentially you might say any deals over the total cost of your schooling, tuition, room , and board must go towards paying back your scholarship and associated fees.
If PSU costs $50,000 per year for example any money after that pays back the university. After they are paid back you keep it.
I'm not sure how the IRS will look at scholarships now, but do not get surprised if they consider it taxable at some point.
Plus, good luck getting Alabama to turn away a five star prospect because he made over $1000 in NIL. You'd have to get all the schools to agree on that and then you'd have an antitrust lawsuit so fast it would make your head spin.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bourbon n blues

bourbon n blues

Well-Known Member
Nov 20, 2019
20,421
23,507
1
Plus, good luck getting Alabama to turn away a five star prospect because he made over $1000 in NIL. You'd have to get all the schools to agree on that and then you'd have an antitrust lawsuit so fast it would make your head spin.
Bingo, any brakes on this will come from the IRS IMO and the need to pay back scholarship monies. Which of course means NILs will be either just under or cover the added freight.
 

Obliviax

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Aug 21, 2001
107,137
55,979
1
Bingo, any brakes on this will come from the IRS IMO and the need to pay back scholarship monies. Which of course means NILs will be either just under or cover the added freight.
I feel like the path is to appeal to those players who won't be getting NIL contracts. Lower power five, lower level prospects, and non-skill position players. This is the vast majority of players. You get them to feel that they are being underpaid and underrepresented. You then get them to unionize. Once done, you negotiate some kind of plan so that everyone gets something, not just the high visibility players. For that, you get a CBO with portal and commitment guidelines. Basically, like other pro sports (NBA, NFL, MLB) the low-end players and franchises get taken care of because of league packed with QBs at the top four programs isn't going to be a winning situation for anyone long term.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bourbon n blues

cvilleelkscoach

Well-Known Member
Feb 4, 2011
2,312
3,640
1
Your missing it all. We aren't talking about pro golf, we are talking about the the rules of amateur status which is it's own section of the Rules of Golf.
What you are missing is that NIL is Name Image likeness. It is not compensation for playing the sport. This has nothing to do with compensation around playing the sport unlike your poor golf example. This allows a SA to be treated just like a non-SA. It levels the playing field.
 

bourbon n blues

Well-Known Member
Nov 20, 2019
20,421
23,507
1
I feel like the path is to appeal to those players who won't be getting NIL contracts. Lower power five, lower level prospects, and non-skill position players. This is the vast majority of players. You get them to feel that they are being underpaid and underrepresented. You then get them to unionize. Once done, you negotiate some kind of plan so that everyone gets something, not just the high visibility players. For that, you get a CBO with portal and commitment guidelines. Basically, like other pro sports (NBA, NFL, MLB) the low-end players and franchises get taken care of because of league packed with QBs at the top four programs isn't going to be a winning situation for anyone long term.
All true.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
What you are missing is that NIL is Name Image likeness. It is not compensation for playing the sport. This has nothing to do with compensation around playing the sport unlike your poor golf example. This allows a SA to be treated just like a non-SA.
Not quite.
The USGA is waiving amateur status rules for college players......so it is in fact set up as I contended originally, however they've decided to make an exception.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
Not quite.
The USGA is waiving amateur status rules for college players......so it is in fact set up as I contended originally, however they've decided to make an exception.
The reason you would get compensation in NIL for golf would be because of your "skill" which would violate the definition of an amateur per the Rules of Amateur Status.
 

fastlax16

Well-Known Member
Jan 1, 2014
6,968
6,011
1
Lots to unpack here. Golf is simply a collection of tournaments loosely sewn together. It isn't a league with team owners or college sponsors. There is an event, players show up and play for the money. They get paid, for all intents and purposes, nothing if they don't win. Then they have personal contracts with sponsors and appearances. The players can play or not play. They can go on other tours and make competitive money. They have options.

Plus, golf isn't a team sport.

If you are 18 and feel you have a path to pro-ball, the only real path is through the NCAA (with few exceptions). The NCAA is a cabal with no input or power by the players even though the colleges own your rights (up until the portal).

There is only one path here. And this is where Emerett really screwed up. The players need a union or some kind of association. Here they can negotiate a collective bargaining agreement. The idea is that everyone participates and does better, not just the elite QBs and WRs. The QBs and WRs will get voted down, in mass, and the rest of the players will vote to make money. The vast majority of college players (OL, DL, LB, second stringers, special teamers) are making nothing. The idea is to let them unionize and then negotiate a CBA with the players union where there is structure and fairness up and down the line (colleges, players, coaches, etc.).

Not sure a union fixes this. The big money isn't coming from schools in the form of salaries, its endorsement income. The NBA CBA has no impact on Lebron's endorsement income as far as I know, nor is he obligated to give a percentage of his Nike deal to the union for guys like Devin Cannady. If Elon Musk wants to pay him 10 billion dollars to drive a Tesla, the CBA doesn't prevent him from doing so, nor is it entitled to a penny of that money.

Do any of the major sports have language in their CBAs related to individual endorsements (endorsement caps or redistribution among other union members) outside of work done on behalf of official team sponsors? If you're a union plumber with a youtube channel giving plumbing tips do you owe a percentage of your youtube income to the union?
 
Last edited:

psugo

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Oct 18, 2001
1,822
606
1
The short and easy answer to control NIL without lawsuits is found right in the Rules of Golf........

A golfer who receives more than $1000 for services or winnings related to golf skill is no longer an amateur and is now considered a professional and may no longer compete is amateur golf events.

All the NCAA needs to do is declare a hard cap on NIL payments for athletes to maintain amateur status. Athletes making in excess of "$65,000" (pick a number) annually based on their athletic skill will no longer be considered "amateur athletes" thus making themselves ineligible to compete in NCAA athletics.

At this point the player is welcome to take as much NIL money as they want.....However at that point they have no more value to their respective university because they wouldn't be eligible to play anymore as an amateur athlete.

Done!
If that was done, the money would be under the table, but similar amounts, rewarding the people willing to cheat. I like it more above board.
 

FWED111

Active Member
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2017
34
40
1
Face the facts here and you will realize college football as we know it is on very, very shaky grounds. Clearly, agents representing players under disguise are negotiating NIL monies. The NCAA is on its last legs and good riddance. EACH state has its own laws and regulations regarding the NIL monies. And this will not be limited to simply football and basketball. And how do you unionize individual sports across 50 states and have them come up with a single plan that can be supported by all. Many colleges are located in small cities with less than strong economies that will not place large sums of monies for local sports teams in the NIL debacle. The best answer is to have the US Congress pass a single piece of legislation to address NIL and even better have the legislation give colleges anti-trust exemption as baseball has. The President then must sign the bill. Will this happen? NO, NO, NO. Only the few will gain much through NIL and that must recognized. The democrats will demand money for ALL participants and that means taxpayer funding. This is a bag of worms and the original lawyers in the NIL lawsuit have promised more law suits. Only the demise of women's sports and or the demise of all sports at poor/small colleges will this be addressed by congress. Again, this is upon us and will severely damage college football in the very near future. College basketball is corrupt now so forget them.
 

lowhandicapper

Well-Known Member
Aug 24, 2021
175
150
1
Face the facts here and you will realize college football as we know it is on very, very shaky grounds. Clearly, agents representing players under disguise are negotiating NIL monies. The NCAA is on its last legs and good riddance. EACH state has its own laws and regulations regarding the NIL monies. And this will not be limited to simply football and basketball. And how do you unionize individual sports across 50 states and have them come up with a single plan that can be supported by all. Many colleges are located in small cities with less than strong economies that will not place large sums of monies for local sports teams in the NIL debacle. The best answer is to have the US Congress pass a single piece of legislation to address NIL and even better have the legislation give colleges anti-trust exemption as baseball has. The President then must sign the bill. Will this happen? NO, NO, NO. Only the few will gain much through NIL and that must recognized. The democrats will demand money for ALL participants and that means taxpayer funding. This is a bag of worms and the original lawyers in the NIL lawsuit have promised more law suits. Only the demise of women's sports and or the demise of all sports at poor/small colleges will this be addressed by congress. Again, this is upon us and will severely damage college football in the very near future. College basketball is corrupt now so forget them.
You folks and your doomsday scenarios. It's comical. Get off the 7-10pm Fox News block of fear and anger. If you only knew.
There is a forest beyond the trees and the college football season will be upon us and not much will have changed except your perception of it.
As I started this thread....Define amateurism formally and you solve a vast majority of "problems" with NIL, although kids who have been getting exploited by schools for decades getting paid isn't really a problem.....Except Ted from Selins Grove thinks so, Ted is an overweight 54 year old that never played an organized sport past age 14.....He's really mad about kids getting paid.
 
Last edited:

fastlax16

Well-Known Member
Jan 1, 2014
6,968
6,011
1
You folks and your doomsday scenarios. It's comical. Get off the 7-10pm Fox News block of fear and anger. If you only knew.
There is a forest beyond the trees and the college football season will be upon us and not much will have changed except your perception of it.
As I started this thread....Define amateurism formally and you solve a vast majority of "problems" with NIL, although kids who have been getting exploited by schools for decades getting paid isn't really a problem.....Except Ted from Selins Grove thinks so, Ted is an overweight 54 year old that never played an organized sport past age 14.....He's really mad about kids getting paid.

The situation isn't that dire and Ted's opinion doesn't matter, but its still an issue. Not kids getting paid, but that it's totally unregulated. I think a lot of the stupid money flowing right now probably calms down over the next few years as more data points emerge and people realize a lot of it doesn't yield the desired outcoms. I don't think you can argue that it's good for the game that lowhandicapper can call an 17/18 year old and tell him theres an endorsement contract waiting for him from LowHandiCapper Inc if he attends Penn State.

Imagine what it would look like if the NFL scrapped the draft, the salary cap and let players void their contracts to become free agents whenever they wanted. The product would suffer and it wouldn't be sustainable. That's essentially what college football has become. Do you think that model would be better for the NFL?

Gross exaggeration but if Jeff Bezos or Elon Musk were giant college football fans they could turn their alma maters (Princeton and UPenn) into the two most talented programs over night (Ivy League restrictions not withstanding) by signing every top hs prospect and player in the portal to some insane NIL agreements that no one is in a position to turn down.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bourbon n blues

Latest posts