How to Fix the Republican brand

m.knox

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Aug 20, 2003
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You're projecting. I’m not an angry nutbag. I am not a victim. You are.

Read the studies. I can give you Mitre and Rand Corp studies too.

You are an angry nutbag and victim who rejected the decision of our democracy over 5 years ago.

Live with it Ned.
 
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BW Lion

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Apr 9, 2020
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Swing and a miss PPB.

“Clearly”

I have said it many times on this board. I consider myself one of the luckiest assholes on the planet.
I can always tell when my “probes” strike actual nerves such that the targets feel the need to respond with their version of “secret information”.

Do you think the use of PPB negatively affects me? It’s actually a compliment that you and @LafayetteBear (aka PedoBear) still remember one of my prior monikers.

I thank you for you obsession
 
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MaconNitt

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Oct 18, 2016
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You are an angry nutbag and victim who rejected the decision of our democracy over 5 years ago.

Live with it Ned.
Pot meet kettle

Seems like you are the angry nut bag who has rejected the decision of our democracy over 17 months ago

Live with it Knox

See how easy that is
 

LafayetteBear

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Dec 1, 2009
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I can always tell when my “probes” strike actual nerves such that the targets feel the need to respond with their version of “secret information”.

Do you think the use of PPB negatively affects me? It’s actually a compliment that you and @LafayetteBear (aka PedoBear) still remember one of my prior monikers.

I thank you for you obsession
Did you think I called you PPB with the intent of aggravating you?!! I use that term because I am a believer in sticking with your posting handle where possible.
 

dailybuck777

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Jan 2, 2018
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classic evasion tactic to try to avoid answering a question that could be contradicted.
True. Well known tactic used by Hillary when questioned under oath by FBI about emails on private server. I believe she said she couldn't remember about 40 times. Undoubtedly many of those answers were lies.
 
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MaconNitt

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True. Well known tactic used by Hillary when questioned under oath by FBI about emails on private server. I believe she said she couldn't remember about 40 times. Undoubtedly many of those answers were lies.
this thread is about republicans, try to stay on topic. whataboutism is another tactic used by republicans. If you would like to start a new thread on how to fix the democrat brand I would be glad to engage you there.
 

dailybuck777

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Jan 2, 2018
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Dems are complete fakes. They consistently criticize Republicans for things they routinely do. The biggest example of that is calling Jan. 6 some sort of unprecedented coup attempt, when Dems engaged in 16 mo. coup attempt by virtue of the misnomered Mueller investigation. What Green did is routinely done in trials and depositions day after day in the legal system. Just barely newsworthy. A tiny speck of sand compared to lies by Pelosi and Schiff and corporate media.

Dems want a one-sided justice system where their misdeeds are ignored (for instance Hillary destroying 30,000 emails which a court order required to be preserved with no penalty at all) and Republicans are magnified. Call it whatever you want, but no reason for Repubs or conservatives not to call out Dems in situations like this and put what happened in perspective.
 

MaconNitt

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Dems are complete fakes. They consistently criticize Republicans for things they routinely do. The biggest example of that is calling Jan. 6 some sort of unprecedented coup attempt, when Dems engaged in 16 mo. coup attempt by virtue of the misnomered Mueller investigation. What Green did is routinely done in trials and depositions day after day in the legal system. Just barely newsworthy. A tiny speck of sand compared to lies by Pelosi and Schiff and corporate media.

Dems want a one-sided justice system where their misdeeds are ignored (for instance Hillary destroying 30,000 emails which a court order required to be preserved with no penalty at all) and Republicans are magnified. Call it whatever you want, but no reason for Repubs or conservatives not to call out Dems in situations like this and put what happened in perspective.
cry me a river. BOO HOO HOO. more what aboutism. Mueller Investigation netted 30+ indictments. The only thing it didn't do was indict Trump, because he dangled pardons to his cronies so they wouldn't roll over on him, and his hand picked AG Barr wouldn't let Mueller do it. You certainly have a selective memory. here is a list


No collusion, no collusion, no collusion....then it was even if there was collusion its not a crime. Don Jr takes a meeting with Russians because they supposedly had dirt on Hillary saying " I love it" a theme that was used again on the call with Zelensky to get dirt on Biden

Trump Jr. was receptive, responding in part, "if it's what you say I love it especially later in the summer."

 

MaconNitt

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Oct 18, 2016
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Dems want a one-sided justice system where their misdeeds are ignored (for instance Hillary destroying 30,000 emails which a court order required to be preserved with no penalty at all) and Republicans are magnified. Call it whatever you want, but no reason for Repubs or conservatives not to call out Dems in situations like this and put what happened in perspective.
the repubs had their chances twice to get Hillary and whiffed, Benghazi and control of the house and senate for Trumps first 2 years and what do they have to show for it. Nada. you should be angry with the repubs.
 

LafayetteBear

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Dec 1, 2009
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this thread is about republicans, try to stay on topic. whataboutism is another tactic used by republicans. If you would like to start a new thread on how to fix the democrat brand I would be glad to engage you there.
Macon Nitt: You’re wasting your breath trying to get Buck to forswear the whataboutism for even a nanosecond. He’s truly a lost cause. In his deeply red hued view of things, Republicans are incapable of doing wrong and Democrats are incapable of doing right.
 
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m.knox

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Aug 20, 2003
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Pot meet kettle

Seems like you are the angry nut bag who has rejected the decision of our democracy over 17 months ago

Live with it Knox

See how easy that is

Unfortunately, you are incorrect. If it isn't obvious to you, I'm simply mimicking the unhinged behavior of the cult over the last 5 years.....

Consider it a mirror.

Secondly, I never rejected Biden. I'm was terribly disappointed of his "win" for reasons that should be obvious now. I can safely say, "told you so."
 

m.knox

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Aug 20, 2003
103,222
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this thread is about republicans, try to stay on topic. whataboutism is another tactic used by republicans. If you would like to start a new thread on how to fix the democrat brand I would be glad to engage you there.

But, but, but............ WHATABOUT TRUMP????? lol....
 

m.knox

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Aug 20, 2003
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Macon Nitt: You’re wasting your breath trying to get Buck to forswear the whataboutism for every a nanosecond. He’s truly a lost cause. In his deeply red hued view of things, Republicans are incapable of doing wrong and Democrats are incapable of doing right.

Repeat that 1000 times. lol....
 

tIUguy2

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May 25, 2016
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It's damn near Mission Impossible, you'd have to concede. But they could start by denouncing Trump Cultists who advocated a declaration of martial law in the wake of Trump's electoral loss to Joe Biden. You know, people like Marjorie Taylor Green, who was hardly alone in doing so. (Love that she now testifies that she "has no recollection" of doing so.) This trove of e-mails to and from Mark Meadows is pure gold. :cool:

The Democrats are doing a bang up job of fixing the Republican brand for them.
 
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ao5884

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Pure obfuscation. You know and he knows what I was asking.


Carl Sandburg

here is the context, the why…

Role of social psychological factors​

In addition to individual level variables, scholars of extremism have also emphasized the role of social psychological factors, such identity and belonging processes.[18] One theoretical framework that has explored the psychological motivations behind extremism is significance quest theory (SQT).[19] According to this theory, extreme beliefs and actions reflect means of obtaining or restoring an individual’s experience of personal significance and identity.[20] Indeed, the experience of significant loss (e.g., experiences of humiliation, rejection, perceived relative deprivation, and injustice) predicts right-wing extreme attitudes and intentions.

Recent work has demonstrated that quest for significance can indeed lead to extremism[21]and motivate people to self-sacrifice for a political cause.[22] For instance, using a sample of Dutch respondents, scholars[23] demonstrated that psychological distress (e.g., perceived deprivation) stimulates adherence to far right ideology, which in turn predicts support for right-wing extremist violence and violent intentions.[24] Moreover, a study using a sample of white Americans with Republican affiliation[25] showed that perceived psychological distress predicted stronger willingness to violently persecute political out-groups. Effects on these extremist tendencies were largely mediated by people’s increased closeness with their political leader.[26]In other words, the more psychological distress people experience, the more they identified with their political leader, which in turn made them more willing to use violence against those identified as threats by this leader.[27]

In short, this shit is a concern and is being studied the world over.

You, m.Knox and most of your nutbag brethren here are not unique. You all fit into a pretty tight profile.

BTW, I could list dozens of studies from across academia and the entire political spectrum. They all land in a fairly tight circle.
Again none of this changes the validity of my original statement. And of course you conti ue to make assumptions about what other people know or do not know about the criteria of a variable or the context in which you ask a question. Again In order for someone to answer a question you have to define the qualifiers for the variables within the question. Let's break down your "question". First you call the I individual a "wounded little girl" . What is a girl? Seems like a prudent detail to include given our current state. Beyond that to most people it would seem like you are inferring that being a girl is a bad thing so bad infant you use it as an insult. So we could ask the question. Why are you a anti-girl/woman? In short you are relying on "studies" (calling something a study does not make it true) without having a grasp of basic principles that govern asking a question. In short without context and or establishing the specific criteria for a given question. That question in fact cannot be answered. Furthermore using the "he knew what I ment" justification is also not possible because you have not established what you yourself actually mean. As far as I know people have not developed tech to read minds. So I'll tell you a third time
DO BETTER
 
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dailybuck777

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Mueller Investigation netted 30+ indictments. The only thing it didn't do was indict Trump, because he dangled pardons to his cronies so they wouldn't roll over on him, and his hand picked AG Barr wouldn't let Mueller do it. You certainly have a selective memory. here is a list
Complete garbage. None of these convictions had anything to do with Trump campaign collusion. Manafort was convicted of unrelated tax evasion and Michael Cohen was convicted of lying about the purpose of a loan (to avoid embarrassment) which had nothing to do with the ability to repay the loan. We could probably have 100,000 people behind bars if this law was generally enforced the way that Mueller selectively enforced it to try to get Cohen to flip and lie. My deceased parents (without my assistance) violated this law to get a mortgage on a house that was solely occupied by my sister. (loan paid off)

Investigation run by dishonest Dem partisan Democrats. If there was a sliver of anything that implicated Trump, they would have jumped on it. After 2,500 subpoenas zilch.
 
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dailybuck777

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Macon Nitt: You’re wasting your breath trying to get Buck to forswear the whataboutism for every a nanosecond. He’s truly a lost cause. In his deeply red hued view of things, Republicans are incapable of doing wrong and Democrats are incapable of doing right.
You are welcome to respond to my challenge of the top couple of ways that Trump colluded with Russia. Lefty disinformation rags throw up garbage which is easily dismissed once looked at half-closely -- such as Trump tower meeting. (which you also cited in post I can't find now)

The meeting was arranged by a publicist (Goldstone with past ties to the Trumps) who puffed up claims of Clinton wrongdoing with the Russians in order to help the wealthy father of a Russian pop singer.. Goldstone was 100% non-political. I went into detail here if you have any actual remote interest in facts as opposed to superficial bloviating by Dems. https://bwi.forums.rivals.com/threa...ers-who-still-claim-russian-collusion.311185/
 
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dailybuck777

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the repubs had their chances twice to get Hillary
Partly right here. Trump treats his lawyers like dirt and in return they refuse to give him any loyalty or take any risks. Hillary clearly committed a felony (not even debatable -- her conduct fits 100% within the statute dealing with the safeguarding of secret govt information) and Trump's lawyers thought it would be divisive to indict and prosecute her. Not an unreasonable conclusion at the beginning of his term.

Hunter Biden is clearly guilty of felony tax evasion and nothing has been done about for several years -- The Big Tech -- Dem oligarchy at work.
 

dailybuck777

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Jan 2, 2018
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Macon Nitt: You’re wasting your breath trying to get Buck to forswear the whataboutism for every a nanosecond. He’s truly a lost cause. In his deeply red hued view of things, Republicans are incapable of doing wrong and Democrats are incapable of doing right.
Coming from someone who is so unconcerned about actual facts that he has made up stories like my only source of news is Fox news (I don't even watch it) and that I wasn't vaxxed. If it is convenient to state and supports your virtue signalling, you are happy to make it up.
 

ao5884

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Oct 1, 2019
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So I have reviewed your "treatise" and this is the best way to illustrate what you said...


LOL!!!!
Except you are not qualified to review anything.....especially things that you don't have a basic understanding of. It amazes me that a supposed educated person lacks the ability to ask a properly constructed sentence....even worse a person that then demands that someone answer said question? Maybe you should focus on learning how to properly form a question instead. So for the forth time do better.
 

ao5884

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ao5884

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Complete garbage. None of these convictions had anything to do with Trump campaign collusion. Manafort was convicted of unrelated tax evasion and Michael Cohen was convicted of lying about the purpose of a loan (to avoid embarrassment) which had nothing to do with the ability to repay the loan. We could probably have 100,000 people behind bars if this law was generally enforced the way that Mueller selectively enforced it to try to get Cohen to flip and lie. My deceased parents (without my assistance) violated this law to get a mortgage on a house that was solely occupied by my sister. (loan paid off)

Investigation run by dishonest Dem partisan Democrats. If there was a sliver of anything that implicated Trump, they would have jumped on it. After 2,500 subpoenas zilch.
Again they are leftists...context isn't required the only thing important to them is the indictment arrest etc...what that indictment or arrest is doesn't matter they will just create something to make it fit.
 

MaconNitt

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Oct 18, 2016
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Complete garbage. None of these convictions had anything to do with Trump campaign collusion. Manafort was convicted of unrelated tax evasion and Michael Cohen was convicted of lying about the purpose of a loan (to avoid embarrassment) which had nothing to do with the ability to repay the loan. We could probably have 100,000 people behind bars if this law was generally enforced the way that Mueller selectively enforced it to try to get Cohen to flip and lie. My deceased parents (without my assistance) violated this law to get a mortgage on a house that was solely occupied by my sister. (loan paid off)

Investigation run by dishonest Dem partisan Democrats. If there was a sliver of anything that implicated Trump, they would have jumped on it. After 2,500 subpoenas zilch.
FAKE NEWS!!! FAKE NEWS!!! FAKE NEWS!!!
WITCH HUNT!!! WITCH HUNT!!! WITCH HUNT!!!

Since you didn't mention these I will:

On February 20, a federal judge sentenced Stone to 40 months in prison and ordered him to pay a $20,000 fine, serve four years of probation after his sentence, and complete 250 hours of community service.
A jury convicted Stone in November 2019 on five counts of making false statements, one count of witness tampering, and one count of obstruction of justice stemming from the Russia probe.
Stone, who has worked as a political consultant for Trump since the 1980s, was convicted in a Washington, D.C. federal court on November 15, 2019 on five counts of obstruction of justice, one count of making false statements to Congress, and one count of witness tampering.
Mueller's investigation charged Stone on those seven counts in January in connection with his statements to Congress on his communications with people affiliated with the radical transparency group WikiLeaks.
Stone, who acted as an informal adviser to Trump during the campaign, sent out several tweets in the summer of 2016 that raised questions about whether he had prior knowledge about WikiLeaks' plans to publish the hacked emails.
The indictment laying out the charges Stone was convicted on alleged that Stone made "multiple false statements to [the House Intelligence Committee] about his interactions regarding Organization 1, and falsely denied possessing records that contained evidence of these interactions" in 2017 testimony.
Not only is making false statements to Congress a crime on its own, but the indictment said that Stone's misleading testimony deliberated obstructed ongoing investigations by the FBI, House Intelligence Committee, and Senate Intelligence Committee.




Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was found guilty on eight federal counts of bank and tax fraud and pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice and one count of conspiracy against the US.

He also entered into a deal that included an agreement to cooperate with Mueller's investigation instead of going to trial in the District of Columbia on a separate indictment of counts of money laundering and failing to register as a foreign agent.

Manafort previously faced a total of 18 counts, but the 10 remaining were dismissed during the plea hearing after a judge declared mistrial in a Virginia trial.

On Nov. 26, however, Mueller's office said in a court filing that in the course of his cooperation, Manafort had lied to the FBI and the special counsel on "a variety of subject matters," which could land him in even more legal jeopardy.

He surrendered to federal authorities on October 30, 2017, after he was indicted, along with his business associate Rick Gates, on 12 counts, including conspiracy against the US and money laundering.

Manafort was forced to step down as Trump's campaign chairman in May 2016 after coming under fire for his connections to Russian oligarchs and his past lobbying efforts abroad.

Trump's former campaign chairman is accused of committing crimes while working as an unregistered lobbyist in the US for the Ukrainian government and pro-Russia interests beginning in 2006.




On August 31, Republican lobbyist Sam Patten plead guilty in federal court for failing to register as a foreign agent while he lobbied on behalf of Ukrainian interests in the US.
Patten worked on behalf of several a pro-Russia Ukrainian political party, including helping Ukrainian oligarchs illegally spend $50,000 in tickets to Trump's January 2017 inauguration, in violation of federal laws that ban inauguration funds from accepting money from foreign entities.
Patten is linked both to Manafort and Kilminik, as well as the opposition research firm Cambridge Analytica.
While Patten technically plead guilty in federal court in the District of Columbia and was not charged by the Mueller probe, Mueller referred the charges to the US Attorney's office for the District of Columbia, and the terms of his guilty plea require him to cooperate in the special counsel investigation.





In October 2017, Gates was indicted along with Manafort on 12 counts, including conspiracy against the US, making false statements, and failing to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts. He at first pleaded not guilty on all counts.

Gates joined Trump election efforts in the spring of 2016, working as Manafort's deputy. He traveled with Trump and grew close with many top campaign officials.

After Manafort was ousted as Trump's campaign chief in August 2016, Gates continued working on behalf of the soon-to-be president, helping fundraise $25 million for the pro-Trump nonprofit America First Policies and working on Trump's inaugural committee. As Mueller's probe intensified in the early months of the Trump administration, Gates left the nonprofit altogether.

But as recently as June 2017, The Daily Beast reported that Gates was still visiting the White House and working under Tom Barrack, who has remained one of Trump's most trusted advisers.

Gates opted to take a plea deal in late February, pleading guilty to one charge of lying to investigators and one charge of conspiracy in exchange for becoming a cooperating witness in the Mueller probe. He testified against Manafort as the prosecution's star witness in its case in Virginia.

Gates confessed to committing crimes with Manafort, and also stealing millions of dollars from his longtime business partner to finance an extramarital affair.

Defense attorneys sought to paint Gates as the mastermind of his and Manafort's tax and bank fraud.







On the same day Mueller's office announced the indictments of Manafort and Gates, it was revealed that George Papadopoulos, a 30-year-old former Trump adviser, had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russia.
After delivering seven hours of testimony to the House Judiciary and Oversight committees in October, Papadopoulos sought immunity before testifying to the Senate about Russian meddling and possible collusion with the Trump campaign.
According to documents that were unsealed by the Mueller investigation, Papadopoulos had made at least six attempts to set up a meeting between the Trump campaign and Russian representatives throughout the course of the 2016 presidential campaign, using a London-based professor named Joseph Mifsud and a female Russian national as conduits.
He was arrested October 5, 2017, and subsequently cooperated with Mueller's team. Papadopoulos is currently serving a 14-day prison sentence for lying to the FBI.
Trump has described Papadopoulos as a low-level volunteer.
"Few people knew the young, low level volunteer named George, who has already proven to be a liar," Trump tweeted following news of the guilty plea. "Check the DEMS!"
Special counsel Robert Mueller previously recommended that Papadopoulos be sentenced to as many as six months in prison.


Flynn, who has reportedly been at the center of Mueller's investigation for months, is perhaps the most high-profile person to be indicted to date.
On December 1, 2017, he pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his conversations last December with Russia's ambassador to the US at the time, Sergey Kislyak.
An indictment filed by Mueller's office said Flynn "falsely stated" on December 29, 2016 that he did not ask Kislyak "to refrain from escalating the situation in response to sanctions that the United States had imposed against Russia that same day," and that Flynn did not recall Kislyak "subsequently telling him that Russia had chosen to moderate its response to those sanctions as a result of his request."
Trump fired Flynn in February 2016, citing an "evolving and eroding level of trust" after the former national security adviser lied to Vice President Mike Pence about his interactions with Kislyak.
The firing was "not based on a legal issue, but based on a trust issue," Sean Spicer, who was then the White House press secretary, said at the time.
Flynn had been on the job for just 25 days.




I guess these were all just errand boys who picked up the coffee and made photo copies.



You even threw your deceased parents, may they rest in peace, under the bus to try to make a point on a message board. How sick is that.
 

MaconNitt

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2016
2,376
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Partly right here. Trump treats his lawyers like dirt and in return they refuse to give him any loyalty or take any risks. Hillary clearly committed a felony (not even debatable -- her conduct fits 100% within the statute dealing with the safeguarding of secret govt information) and Trump's lawyers thought it would be divisive to indict and prosecute her. Not an unreasonable conclusion at the beginning of his term.

Hunter Biden is clearly guilty of felony tax evasion and nothing has been done about for several years -- The Big Tech -- Dem oligarchy at work.
says you, anyone who uses their deceased parents in a post on a message to support Trump loses all credibility. 😢 🙏
 

dailybuck777

Well-Known Member
Jan 2, 2018
10,502
14,473
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FAKE NEWS!!! FAKE NEWS!!! FAKE NEWS!!!
WITCH HUNT!!! WITCH HUNT!!! WITCH HUNT!!!

Since you didn't mention these I will:

On February 20, a federal judge sentenced Stone to 40 months in prison and ordered him to pay a $20,000 fine, serve four years of probation after his sentence, and complete 250 hours of community service.
A jury convicted Stone in November 2019 on five counts of making false statements, one count of witness tampering, and one count of obstruction of justice stemming from the Russia probe.
Stone, who has worked as a political consultant for Trump since the 1980s, was convicted in a Washington, D.C. federal court on November 15, 2019 on five counts of obstruction of justice, one count of making false statements to Congress, and one count of witness tampering.
Mueller's investigation charged Stone on those seven counts in January in connection with his statements to Congress on his communications with people affiliated with the radical transparency group WikiLeaks.
Stone, who acted as an informal adviser to Trump during the campaign, sent out several tweets in the summer of 2016 that raised questions about whether he had prior knowledge about WikiLeaks' plans to publish the hacked emails.
The indictment laying out the charges Stone was convicted on alleged that Stone made "multiple false statements to [the House Intelligence Committee] about his interactions regarding Organization 1, and falsely denied possessing records that contained evidence of these interactions" in 2017 testimony.
Not only is making false statements to Congress a crime on its own, but the indictment said that Stone's misleading testimony deliberated obstructed ongoing investigations by the FBI, House Intelligence Committee, and Senate Intelligence Committee.




Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was found guilty on eight federal counts of bank and tax fraud and pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice and one count of conspiracy against the US.

He also entered into a deal that included an agreement to cooperate with Mueller's investigation instead of going to trial in the District of Columbia on a separate indictment of counts of money laundering and failing to register as a foreign agent.

Manafort previously faced a total of 18 counts, but the 10 remaining were dismissed during the plea hearing after a judge declared mistrial in a Virginia trial.

On Nov. 26, however, Mueller's office said in a court filing that in the course of his cooperation, Manafort had lied to the FBI and the special counsel on "a variety of subject matters," which could land him in even more legal jeopardy.

He surrendered to federal authorities on October 30, 2017, after he was indicted, along with his business associate Rick Gates, on 12 counts, including conspiracy against the US and money laundering.

Manafort was forced to step down as Trump's campaign chairman in May 2016 after coming under fire for his connections to Russian oligarchs and his past lobbying efforts abroad.

Trump's former campaign chairman is accused of committing crimes while working as an unregistered lobbyist in the US for the Ukrainian government and pro-Russia interests beginning in 2006.




On August 31, Republican lobbyist Sam Patten plead guilty in federal court for failing to register as a foreign agent while he lobbied on behalf of Ukrainian interests in the US.
Patten worked on behalf of several a pro-Russia Ukrainian political party, including helping Ukrainian oligarchs illegally spend $50,000 in tickets to Trump's January 2017 inauguration, in violation of federal laws that ban inauguration funds from accepting money from foreign entities.
Patten is linked both to Manafort and Kilminik, as well as the opposition research firm Cambridge Analytica.
While Patten technically plead guilty in federal court in the District of Columbia and was not charged by the Mueller probe, Mueller referred the charges to the US Attorney's office for the District of Columbia, and the terms of his guilty plea require him to cooperate in the special counsel investigation.





In October 2017, Gates was indicted along with Manafort on 12 counts, including conspiracy against the US, making false statements, and failing to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts. He at first pleaded not guilty on all counts.

Gates joined Trump election efforts in the spring of 2016, working as Manafort's deputy. He traveled with Trump and grew close with many top campaign officials.

After Manafort was ousted as Trump's campaign chief in August 2016, Gates continued working on behalf of the soon-to-be president, helping fundraise $25 million for the pro-Trump nonprofit America First Policies and working on Trump's inaugural committee. As Mueller's probe intensified in the early months of the Trump administration, Gates left the nonprofit altogether.

But as recently as June 2017, The Daily Beast reported that Gates was still visiting the White House and working under Tom Barrack, who has remained one of Trump's most trusted advisers.

Gates opted to take a plea deal in late February, pleading guilty to one charge of lying to investigators and one charge of conspiracy in exchange for becoming a cooperating witness in the Mueller probe. He testified against Manafort as the prosecution's star witness in its case in Virginia.

Gates confessed to committing crimes with Manafort, and also stealing millions of dollars from his longtime business partner to finance an extramarital affair.

Defense attorneys sought to paint Gates as the mastermind of his and Manafort's tax and bank fraud.







On the same day Mueller's office announced the indictments of Manafort and Gates, it was revealed that George Papadopoulos, a 30-year-old former Trump adviser, had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russia.
After delivering seven hours of testimony to the House Judiciary and Oversight committees in October, Papadopoulos sought immunity before testifying to the Senate about Russian meddling and possible collusion with the Trump campaign.
According to documents that were unsealed by the Mueller investigation, Papadopoulos had made at least six attempts to set up a meeting between the Trump campaign and Russian representatives throughout the course of the 2016 presidential campaign, using a London-based professor named Joseph Mifsud and a female Russian national as conduits.
He was arrested October 5, 2017, and subsequently cooperated with Mueller's team. Papadopoulos is currently serving a 14-day prison sentence for lying to the FBI.
Trump has described Papadopoulos as a low-level volunteer.
"Few people knew the young, low level volunteer named George, who has already proven to be a liar," Trump tweeted following news of the guilty plea. "Check the DEMS!"
Special counsel Robert Mueller previously recommended that Papadopoulos be sentenced to as many as six months in prison.


Flynn, who has reportedly been at the center of Mueller's investigation for months, is perhaps the most high-profile person to be indicted to date.
On December 1, 2017, he pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his conversations last December with Russia's ambassador to the US at the time, Sergey Kislyak.
An indictment filed by Mueller's office said Flynn "falsely stated" on December 29, 2016 that he did not ask Kislyak "to refrain from escalating the situation in response to sanctions that the United States had imposed against Russia that same day," and that Flynn did not recall Kislyak "subsequently telling him that Russia had chosen to moderate its response to those sanctions as a result of his request."
Trump fired Flynn in February 2016, citing an "evolving and eroding level of trust" after the former national security adviser lied to Vice President Mike Pence about his interactions with Kislyak.
The firing was "not based on a legal issue, but based on a trust issue," Sean Spicer, who was then the White House press secretary, said at the time.
Flynn had been on the job for just 25 days.




I guess these were all just errand boys who picked up the coffee and made photo copies.




You even threw your deceased parents, may they rest in peace, under the bus to try to make a point on a message board. How sick is that.
All that garbage you cite and no collusion. Stone was totally out of the loop on Russia and was a blowhard who lied about everything.

With reference to my parents, they followed the directions of the realtors. I happened to be in California at the time of the closing and was shocked that the realtors would risk their license on a matter like this. Not putting my parents under the bus. They had the money to pay off the loan and they did. The statutes prohibiting lying on loans were intended to prevent situations where people lied to defraud the banks and not pay the loans. Everyone knew what was going on, and no one cared. Although the intent of the statute is to prevent fraudulent borrowing, the language is far broader.

Worked out well for both the lender and my sister.
 

MaconNitt

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2016
2,376
2,966
1
All that garbage you cite and no collusion. Stone was totally out of the loop on Russia and was a blowhard who lied about everything.
you were the one who couldn't stay on topic and brought up the Mueller Investigation.

Mueller's job was to look into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. Collusion was just a part of it.


I love how quickly everyone who was associated with Trump was the best until they weren't
 

dailybuck777

Well-Known Member
Jan 2, 2018
10,502
14,473
1
Mueller's job was to look into Russia's interference in the 2016 election. Collusion was just a part of it.
Wrong again. Here is the official authorization of investigation that places the emphasis on collusion. Also, the Justice dept would not be the dept most skilled in determining whether Russia interfered -- that would be the CIA. (Of course, the US has interfered in about 50 elections, so it is hypocritical for the US to criticize others for what the US has routinely done)

"The Special Counsel is authorized to conduct the investigation confinned by then-FBI Director James 8. Corney in testimony before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on March 20, 2017, including:

any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump; and

any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation; and

any other matters within the scope of 28 C.F.R. § 600.4(a)." https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/f...-order-appointing-robert-s.-mueller-iii-2.pdf
 

MaconNitt

Well-Known Member
Oct 18, 2016
2,376
2,966
1
Wrong again. Here is the official authorization of investigation that places the emphasis on collusion. Also, the Justice dept would not be the dept most skilled in determining whether Russia interfered -- that would be the CIA. (Of course, the US has interfered in about 50 elections, so it is hypocritical for the US to criticize others for what the US has routinely done)

"The Special Counsel is authorized to conduct the investigation confinned by then-FBI Director James 8. Corney in testimony before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on March 20, 2017, including:

any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the campaign of President Donald Trump; and

any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation; and

any other matters within the scope of 28 C.F.R. § 600.4(a)." https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/f...-order-appointing-robert-s.-mueller-iii-2.pdf
uh no,

there you go again skipping the the whole beginning and only choosing the PART that deals with Trump. Trump campaign was only a part ( a related matter ) It doesn't even mention the word collusion

the title is "APPOINTMENT OF SPECIAL COUNSEL

TO INVESTIGATE RUSSIAN INTERFERENCE WITH THE

2016 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION AND
RELATED MATTERS"

By virtue of the authority vested in me as Acting Attorney General, including 28 U.S.C. §§ 509,
510, and 515, in order to discharge my responsibility to provide supervision and management of
the Department of Justice, and to ensure a full and thorough investigation of the Russian government’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, I hereby order as follows:

(a)Robert S. Mueller III is appointed to serve as Special Counsel for the United States
Department of Justice.
(b)The Special Counsel is authorized to conduct the investigation confirmed by then-FBI
Director James B. Comey in testimony before the House Permanent Select Committee on
Intelligence on March 20, 2017, including:

(i)any links and/or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated
with the campaign of President Donald Trump
; and
(ii)any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation; and
(iii)any other matters within the scope of 28 C.F.R. § 600.4(a).
(c)If the Special Counsel believes it is necessary and appropriate, the Special Counsel is authorized to prosecute federal crimes arising from the investigation of these matters.
(d)Sections 600.4 through 600.10 of Title 28 of the Code of Federal Regulations are applicable to the Special Counsel.


PIC



meaningless drivel meant to distract, of which you are not good at
 

ao5884

Well-Known Member
Oct 1, 2019
6,809
6,537
1
So for the fourth time...you provide more ad hominem.

Anything to avoid the acknowledging reality.

University of Chicago
Chicago Project on Security and Threats

"Deep, Divisive, Disturbing and Continuing: New Survey Shows Mainstream Support for Violence To Restore Trump Remains Strong"
Robert Pape | January 2, 2022


Not at all. I am however trying to educate you regarding a basic concept that you should have learned when you were in your early teens. Apparently I am making things complicated since you have yet to show any evidence that would point to an increase in the level of understanding of the topic. It's not my fault that you are unable to grasp even basic concepts when formulating a question. Without context and or qualifying criteria the question that you demand an answer on can't be answered......posting a random survey does not provide either. Therefore your question still can not be answered. Why? Because you refuse to provide what is needed to actually answer the question. So for a fifth time do better (in other words learn how to formulate a question if you want it answered)

Or you can continue to remain ignorant. Your choice,makes no difference to me.
 

LafayetteBear

Well-Known Member
Dec 1, 2009
46,627
20,669
1
FAKE NEWS!!! FAKE NEWS!!! FAKE NEWS!!!
WITCH HUNT!!! WITCH HUNT!!! WITCH HUNT!!!

Since you didn't mention these I will:

On February 20, a federal judge sentenced Stone to 40 months in prison and ordered him to pay a $20,000 fine, serve four years of probation after his sentence, and complete 250 hours of community service.
A jury convicted Stone in November 2019 on five counts of making false statements, one count of witness tampering, and one count of obstruction of justice stemming from the Russia probe.
Stone, who has worked as a political consultant for Trump since the 1980s, was convicted in a Washington, D.C. federal court on November 15, 2019 on five counts of obstruction of justice, one count of making false statements to Congress, and one count of witness tampering.
Mueller's investigation charged Stone on those seven counts in January in connection with his statements to Congress on his communications with people affiliated with the radical transparency group WikiLeaks.
Stone, who acted as an informal adviser to Trump during the campaign, sent out several tweets in the summer of 2016 that raised questions about whether he had prior knowledge about WikiLeaks' plans to publish the hacked emails.
The indictment laying out the charges Stone was convicted on alleged that Stone made "multiple false statements to [the House Intelligence Committee] about his interactions regarding Organization 1, and falsely denied possessing records that contained evidence of these interactions" in 2017 testimony.
Not only is making false statements to Congress a crime on its own, but the indictment said that Stone's misleading testimony deliberated obstructed ongoing investigations by the FBI, House Intelligence Committee, and Senate Intelligence Committee.




Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was found guilty on eight federal counts of bank and tax fraud and pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to obstruct justice and one count of conspiracy against the US.

He also entered into a deal that included an agreement to cooperate with Mueller's investigation instead of going to trial in the District of Columbia on a separate indictment of counts of money laundering and failing to register as a foreign agent.

Manafort previously faced a total of 18 counts, but the 10 remaining were dismissed during the plea hearing after a judge declared mistrial in a Virginia trial.

On Nov. 26, however, Mueller's office said in a court filing that in the course of his cooperation, Manafort had lied to the FBI and the special counsel on "a variety of subject matters," which could land him in even more legal jeopardy.

He surrendered to federal authorities on October 30, 2017, after he was indicted, along with his business associate Rick Gates, on 12 counts, including conspiracy against the US and money laundering.

Manafort was forced to step down as Trump's campaign chairman in May 2016 after coming under fire for his connections to Russian oligarchs and his past lobbying efforts abroad.

Trump's former campaign chairman is accused of committing crimes while working as an unregistered lobbyist in the US for the Ukrainian government and pro-Russia interests beginning in 2006.




On August 31, Republican lobbyist Sam Patten plead guilty in federal court for failing to register as a foreign agent while he lobbied on behalf of Ukrainian interests in the US.
Patten worked on behalf of several a pro-Russia Ukrainian political party, including helping Ukrainian oligarchs illegally spend $50,000 in tickets to Trump's January 2017 inauguration, in violation of federal laws that ban inauguration funds from accepting money from foreign entities.
Patten is linked both to Manafort and Kilminik, as well as the opposition research firm Cambridge Analytica.
While Patten technically plead guilty in federal court in the District of Columbia and was not charged by the Mueller probe, Mueller referred the charges to the US Attorney's office for the District of Columbia, and the terms of his guilty plea require him to cooperate in the special counsel investigation.





In October 2017, Gates was indicted along with Manafort on 12 counts, including conspiracy against the US, making false statements, and failing to file reports of foreign bank and financial accounts. He at first pleaded not guilty on all counts.

Gates joined Trump election efforts in the spring of 2016, working as Manafort's deputy. He traveled with Trump and grew close with many top campaign officials.

After Manafort was ousted as Trump's campaign chief in August 2016, Gates continued working on behalf of the soon-to-be president, helping fundraise $25 million for the pro-Trump nonprofit America First Policies and working on Trump's inaugural committee. As Mueller's probe intensified in the early months of the Trump administration, Gates left the nonprofit altogether.

But as recently as June 2017, The Daily Beast reported that Gates was still visiting the White House and working under Tom Barrack, who has remained one of Trump's most trusted advisers.

Gates opted to take a plea deal in late February, pleading guilty to one charge of lying to investigators and one charge of conspiracy in exchange for becoming a cooperating witness in the Mueller probe. He testified against Manafort as the prosecution's star witness in its case in Virginia.

Gates confessed to committing crimes with Manafort, and also stealing millions of dollars from his longtime business partner to finance an extramarital affair.

Defense attorneys sought to paint Gates as the mastermind of his and Manafort's tax and bank fraud.







On the same day Mueller's office announced the indictments of Manafort and Gates, it was revealed that George Papadopoulos, a 30-year-old former Trump adviser, had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his contacts with Russia.
After delivering seven hours of testimony to the House Judiciary and Oversight committees in October, Papadopoulos sought immunity before testifying to the Senate about Russian meddling and possible collusion with the Trump campaign.
According to documents that were unsealed by the Mueller investigation, Papadopoulos had made at least six attempts to set up a meeting between the Trump campaign and Russian representatives throughout the course of the 2016 presidential campaign, using a London-based professor named Joseph Mifsud and a female Russian national as conduits.
He was arrested October 5, 2017, and subsequently cooperated with Mueller's team. Papadopoulos is currently serving a 14-day prison sentence for lying to the FBI.
Trump has described Papadopoulos as a low-level volunteer.
"Few people knew the young, low level volunteer named George, who has already proven to be a liar," Trump tweeted following news of the guilty plea. "Check the DEMS!"
Special counsel Robert Mueller previously recommended that Papadopoulos be sentenced to as many as six months in prison.


Flynn, who has reportedly been at the center of Mueller's investigation for months, is perhaps the most high-profile person to be indicted to date.
On December 1, 2017, he pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his conversations last December with Russia's ambassador to the US at the time, Sergey Kislyak.
An indictment filed by Mueller's office said Flynn "falsely stated" on December 29, 2016 that he did not ask Kislyak "to refrain from escalating the situation in response to sanctions that the United States had imposed against Russia that same day," and that Flynn did not recall Kislyak "subsequently telling him that Russia had chosen to moderate its response to those sanctions as a result of his request."
Trump fired Flynn in February 2016, citing an "evolving and eroding level of trust" after the former national security adviser lied to Vice President Mike Pence about his interactions with Kislyak.
The firing was "not based on a legal issue, but based on a trust issue," Sean Spicer, who was then the White House press secretary, said at the time.
Flynn had been on the job for just 25 days.




I guess these were all just errand boys who picked up the coffee and made photo copies.




You even threw your deceased parents, may they rest in peace, under the bus to try to make a point on a message board. How sick is that.
Buck says that's all "fake news." He (not it) is as simple as that.