FC: “Kirk Herbstreit says he 'still can't taste or smell' five months after testing positive for COVID-19”

wolve1972

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It's so funny that non-OSU fans think Kirk is a giant homer while OSU fans can't stand him.
Both are true statements. I spend much of my time on B1G boards - specifically UM. OSU and PSU boards. Every time an article surfaces about Herbstreit - especially on some of the OSU boards - many OSU fans consider him a turncoat. Basically, nobody cares for him
 
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83wuzme

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Back in Feb 2020, I had a "cold" that seemed pretty typical, other than after the cold went away, a cough continued for about 6 weeks or so. My wife had the same "cold" at the time, and hers came with viral pink eye.

Then mid-late summer, I started smelling cigarette smoke as my "default" smell. I could always smell scents that were present, but if there was no other scent, I would smell cigarette smoke.

At the time - and until I read your post - I assumed it was from working in our wood shop. I assumed sawdust was messing with my smell.

But I also noticed that even when I would be away from the shop for a few days, it would have no effect on the cigarette smoke smell.

And then get this... So, about a month ago, the cigarette smell finally went away.

Last Friday I was at a packed indoor music venue (4000 capacity). No chance I wasn't exposed to Covid that night.

It's now a week later, and seemingly no Covid (symptoms), BUT, I smell the cigarette smoke again.

At this point, I think it might be pretty safe to assume that I received my delta "booster" last Friday night. Lol

Thoughts?
That is strange. My information on this is pretty much anecdotal. Because I see so many patients in my office for regular care, I have encountered a large number of persons who had COVID. I often will ask them about when they had it, their symptoms and any lingering sequelae. I can tell you that I have heard many adult patients, usually 30 - 50 years old, complaining about a lingering cigarette odor. Most of these people did not become significantly ill from the virus and most of them do report that this odor diminishes over time. Some of them reported a worsening of this phantom odor after vaccination and a few actually reported it went away after vaccination, so it may not be causative in either case.

Your report about a possible recent exposure is certainly intriguing. It seems possible, perhaps highly probable, that the official case numbers are a major undercount of the actual situation. With so many vaccinated and previously infected persons and a virus variant that is twice as infectious as previous versions, it seems like the number of actual infections should far exceed what we saw at this time last year. Add to that the reduction of masking and social distancing. If this is the case, we may hopefully see an earlier than expected peak, but I would not feel confident about making that a prediction for the record.
 

The Spin Meister

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That is strange. My information on this is pretty much anecdotal. Because I see so many patients in my office for regular care, I have encountered a large number of persons who had COVID. I often will ask them about when they had it, their symptoms and any lingering sequelae. I can tell you that I have heard many adult patients, usually 30 - 50 years old, complaining about a lingering cigarette odor. Most of these people did not become significantly ill from the virus and most of them do report that this odor diminishes over time. Some of them reported a worsening of this phantom odor after vaccination and a few actually reported it went away after vaccination, so it may not be causative in either case.

Your report about a possible recent exposure is certainly intriguing. It seems possible, perhaps highly probable, that the official case numbers are a major undercount of the actual situation. With so many vaccinated and previously infected persons and a virus variant that is twice as infectious as previous versions, it seems like the number of actual infections should far exceed what we saw at this time last year. Add to that the reduction of masking and social distancing. If this is the case, we may hopefully see an earlier than expected peak, but I would not feel confident about making that a prediction for the record.
First I have heard about the cigarette smell. Does that happen to people that smoked or does it happen to,people that don’t?

I never smoked but my parents did. Hate the smell and it would be pretty bad to start smelling that all the time.
 

BoulderFish

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First I have heard about the cigarette smell. Does that happen to people that smoked or does it happen to,people that don’t?

I never smoked but my parents did. Hate the smell and it would be pretty bad to start smelling that all the time.

I'm 47 and have probably smoked a total of 20'ish cigarettes in my life -- Most when I was a kid. My parents smoked cigarettes a bit while I was growing up at home, but I don't have a memory of some bad cigarette smell from my days living at home. All FWIW.
 
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PSU Mike

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I'm 47 and have probably smoked a total of 20'ish cigarettes in my life -- Most when I was a kid. My parents smoked cigarettes a bit while I was growing up at home, but I don't have a memory of some bad cigarette smell from my days living at home. All FWIW.
I hear if you’re fast enough you effectively outrun smells.
 

Art

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I'm 47 and have probably smoked a total of 20'ish cigarettes in my life -- Most when I was a kid. My parents smoked cigarettes a bit while I was growing up at home, but I don't have a memory of some bad cigarette smell from my days living at home. All FWIW.

Before you entirely freak out about it, the smell of cigarette smoke can linger for quite a while and carry a long way.
 

KPG55

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Oct 9, 2001
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See the link below. From the article:

“ESPN college football analyst Kirk Herbstreit said Tuesday that he hasn't been able to taste or smell since he tested positive for COVID-19 back in late December.

Herbstreit tweeted on Tuesday: "Been 5 months since I tested positive for Covid. Still can’t taste or smell. Anyone else experience this?? Did it ever come back?? Haven’t tasted a meal since late December. After 5 months...is this my new normal or will taste and smell come back???"

Herbstreit notably covered last season's College Football Playoff semifinal between Clemson and Ohio State during his diagnosis.

According to the Yale School of Medicine, as many as a third of people diagnosed with COVID-19 reported losing their sense of smell.”



😕
These comments about Herbstreit’s health are classless.
Well what did you expect? Only thing funnier would be a fatal car wreck involving our favorite coach from up North. What do thy say about karma, can't remember I lost my sense of humor.
 

BoulderFish

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Before you entirely freak out about it, the smell of cigarette smoke can linger for quite a while and carry a long way.

It's certainly not pleasant, but I'm the opposite of freaked out about it. I'm fascinated by the how well the circumstances all fit this new hypothesis, and frankly I'm borderline giddy about what it means for me if it's true (that I now have my "delta" booster and I'm good for the northern-state winter surge).
 
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BoulderFish

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And I wonder how many that claim they are anti vaccine are actually just afraid of needles?

I think there is some truth to that. I doubt it's an overriding factor for many (though I'm sure there are some), but I would not be surprised if there were not a relatively large chunk of the "vaccine hesitant" group that has performed their risk analysis, and if the result doesn't land pretty far over on the "definitely get the vaccine" end, the "fear/discomfort" of needles becomes a factor.
 
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demlion

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I think there is some truth to that. I doubt it's an overriding factor for many (though I'm sure there are some), but I would not be surprised if there were not a relatively large chunk of the "vaccine hesitant" group that has performed their risk analysis, and if the result doesn't land pretty far over on the "definitely get the vaccine" end, the "fear/discomfort" of needles becomes a factor.
So when will your immunity wear off?
 

Carl Spackler

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I think there is some truth to that. I doubt it's an overriding factor for many (though I'm sure there are some), but I would not be surprised if there were not a relatively large chunk of the "vaccine hesitant" group that has performed their risk analysis, and if the result doesn't land pretty far over on the "definitely get the vaccine" end, the "fear/discomfort" of needles becomes a factor.
I suspect you are correct. Some do have an inordinate fear of needles. My wife attestes to that from a long term of experience and she said the big men were the worst, not as tough as they portended.
 

83wuzme

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First I have heard about the cigarette smell. Does that happen to people that smoked or does it happen to,people that don’t?

I never smoked but my parents did. Hate the smell and it would be pretty bad to start smelling that all the time.
I have heard several people compare the distorted smell perceptions they experienced post COVID as being similar to cigarette odor. I don’t think most of these people ever smoked.
 
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BoulderFish

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So when will your immunity wear off?

Depends on your definition of immunity.

It's approximately the same for both vaccine-induced and infection/recovery-induced (though the latter appears to be a bit more robust in the long term), but here is how it works:

Upon either initial exposure or vaccine, your immune system:
1. Figures out and creates the plans/blueprints for the neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) necessary to defeat this particular virus. These blueprints are maintained as B and T-cells ("memory" cells).
2. Generates nAbs until it determines that the virus has been cleared.

After the infection is cleared, these nAbs hang around for about 4-6 months. While you have these nAbs, if/when you're re-exposed to the virus, these nAbs typically knock it right out and you never actually become infected.

But after these nAbs wear off (again, generally around 4-6 months), you still are protected against the virus, but the protection isn't quite a "sterilizing" as when you had the nAbs.

Upon exposure after the nAbs have worn off, your body has to regenerate new nAbs, BUT it can do it a lot faster this time because it still has the blueprints in the B/T-cells. Because of this small delay, some (many) experience a minor infection before the new nAbs get there to knock it out. And these new nAbs will last another 4-6 months.

This is why we're seeing as big of - or bigger - spikes in cases now than before the vaccines. Most people received their vaccines Feb-April timeframe, and their nAbs wore off in June/July.

So, back to your original question:
- If your definition of "immunity" is that you cannot be infected, then the answer is about 4-6 months.
- If your definition of "immunity" is protection from anything more severe than a cold, then the answer is that it probably never wears off (with caveat)

Caveat: As the virus evolves, the nAbs generated from B/T-cells from your last infection (vax or natural) will gradually become less effective. So, if a long time goes by without exposure to the virus, or a booster that is representative of a newer edition of the virus, you could get to the point where, effectively, you don't have much immunity to the virus.
 

PearlSUJam

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It's certainly not pleasant, but I'm the opposite of freaked out about it. I'm fascinated by the how well the circumstances all fit this new hypothesis, and frankly I'm borderline giddy about what it means for me if it's true (that I now have my "delta" booster and I'm good for the northern-state winter surge).
Don't be too happy about it. It could be a resident poltergeist. 😱