COVID Proves It: Democrats Couldn’t Care Less About Minorities Or The Poor

royboy

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Nov 9, 2001
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To understand the impact of school shutdowns on learning, Harvard University’s Center for Education Policy Research compiled testing data on 2.1 million students in 49 states to see how school closures and the use of remote “learning” affected academic achievement.

The findings are deeply troubling. Closing schools “had profound consequences for student achievement.” Worse, it widened economic and racial education gaps. The researchers found that “high-poverty schools were more likely to go remote and the consequences for student achievement were more negative when they did so.”


One of the study’s authors, Thomas Kane, told the New York Times that “this will probably be the largest increase in educational inequity in a generation.”

The study also revealed a wide gulf between states based on how long they shuttered their schools – ranging from a handful of weeks to 20 weeks or more.

What the authors didn’t point out, but which is the inescapable conclusion to be drawn, is that states and cities run by Democrats kept their schools closed far longer than those run by Republicans.
 

JR4PSU

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Sep 27, 2002
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Democrats will gleefully cite the most dubious evidence of racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia, 'demophobia' but will ignore clear evidence when it goes against their chosen narrative of the day.
 
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bdgan

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May 29, 2008
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To understand the impact of school shutdowns on learning, Harvard University’s Center for Education Policy Research compiled testing data on 2.1 million students in 49 states to see how school closures and the use of remote “learning” affected academic achievement.

The findings are deeply troubling. Closing schools “had profound consequences for student achievement.” Worse, it widened economic and racial education gaps. The researchers found that “high-poverty schools were more likely to go remote and the consequences for student achievement were more negative when they did so.”


One of the study’s authors, Thomas Kane, told the New York Times that “this will probably be the largest increase in educational inequity in a generation.”

The study also revealed a wide gulf between states based on how long they shuttered their schools – ranging from a handful of weeks to 20 weeks or more.

What the authors didn’t point out, but which is the inescapable conclusion to be drawn, is that states and cities run by Democrats kept their schools closed far longer than those run by Republicans.
The thing people don't want to talk about is the level of support provided by the "families" of these kids. Kids with strong family structures likely do better with remote school because parents oversee what they're doing. It's easy for kids with poor family structures to do a minimum amount of work because nobody is watching.

Kids from broken families need in person supervision.
 

JR4PSU

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Sep 27, 2002
40,083
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SE PA
The thing people don't want to talk about is the level of support provided by the "families" of these kids. Kids with strong family structures likely do better with remote school because parents oversee what they're doing. It's easy for kids with poor family structures to do a minimum amount of work because nobody is watching.

Kids from broken families need in person supervision.
I would also suggest that those families where parents are more involved likely tend to be conservative. It's the liberal families that want to minimize their own responsibilities in raising their kids in favor of letting the schools raise their kids. To them, the collective trumps the family.
 

m.knox

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Gold Member
Aug 20, 2003
103,218
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To understand the impact of school shutdowns on learning, Harvard University’s Center for Education Policy Research compiled testing data on 2.1 million students in 49 states to see how school closures and the use of remote “learning” affected academic achievement.

The findings are deeply troubling. Closing schools “had profound consequences for student achievement.” Worse, it widened economic and racial education gaps. The researchers found that “high-poverty schools were more likely to go remote and the consequences for student achievement were more negative when they did so.”


One of the study’s authors, Thomas Kane, told the New York Times that “this will probably be the largest increase in educational inequity in a generation.”

The study also revealed a wide gulf between states based on how long they shuttered their schools – ranging from a handful of weeks to 20 weeks or more.

What the authors didn’t point out, but which is the inescapable conclusion to be drawn, is that states and cities run by Democrats kept their schools closed far longer than those run by Republicans.

Great find Roy. Issues and Insights is a very good website.
 

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