Converting Grill from Propane to Natural Gas

jmorovich

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Apr 28, 2015
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Just curious if anyone has done the above? I bought a new home a couple months ago and they have a natural gas hookup for the grill. My Weber Genesis E-330 is for a propane setup. I contacted Weber about a conversion kit and they told me they don't offer them and can't legally suggest I do the conversion. I see where Home Depot and Lowes both sell conversion kits (along with my local Ace who sells Webers).

I went online and watched a number of video's and it seems pretty straight forward, but wanted to see if anyone has actually done this and if so, how did it go? My other option is taking this grill down the shore and replacing my old Weber down there and buying a whole new natural gas Weber. This is a last resort since the one I currently have and am looking to convert is only 8 months old.

Thanks in advance!
 

aferrelli

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Oct 19, 2009
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Yeah, you can buy a Weber grill for natural gas. I have one and they are a little more expensive. But before I bought my present grill, I had another Weber, one built for propane.

A friend of mine, who worked for a natural gas company, converted my old grill to work with natural gas. I watched him do it, and it seemed pretty simple. I remember him taking a power drill and making the opening (orafice?) larger. In other words, he made the opening wider for the natural gas to come through.

How much wider, I'm not exactly sure. I'm thinking that he just reamed out the opening a bit. Try looking on youtube, you may find someone who explains it a bit better than I can. I only remember that he said that it was easy to do, and it certainly didn't take him very long to do it.
 

Nitt1300

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Nov 2, 2008
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Maybe call your gas company. While it's pretty straightforward, you don't want to DIY something like this if you're not an expert. Gas is safe until it isn't.
 
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ThePennsyOracle

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Oct 9, 2015
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I've never seen anyone do it, but know there are conversion kits for Weber grills sold online.

My only concern would be how good of a seal there is around the new gas valve. If it's not perfect, bad things will happen.
 

tboyer

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Sep 25, 2002
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Different regulator because pressure from tank is much greater than municipal line.
 

aferrelli

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Oct 19, 2009
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I just checked Youtube.com. There are many videos on the topic. I certainly think this is a DIY job with some basic tools.

What's the worst that can happen, an overcooked burnt steak. lol
 
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jmorovich

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Apr 28, 2015
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I just checked Youtube.com. There are many videos on the topic. I certainly think this is a DIY job with some basic tools.

What's the worst that can happen, an overcooked burnt steak. lol

I watched quite a few videos on this. All of the people on the videos make it out to be pretty easy, but like someone said earlier, propane isn't something I generally like to mess with (along with electricity). Just figured I'd post to see if anyone had any personal experience doing it themselves. Looks like I am probably going to be dropping some $$ on a new grill.
 

Nitt1300

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Nov 2, 2008
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I just checked Youtube.com. There are many videos on the topic. I certainly think this is a DIY job with some basic tools.

What's the worst that can happen, an overcooked burnt steak. lol
Salem_gas_explosion.jpg
 

Nitt1300

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Nov 2, 2008
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I watched quite a few videos on this. All of the people on the videos make it out to be pretty easy, but like someone said earlier, propane isn't something I generally like to mess with (along with electricity). Just figured I'd post to see if anyone had any personal experience doing it themselves. Looks like I am probably going to be dropping some $$ on a new grill.
Around here you can't work on a gas line or appliance without a special gas license- most plumbers have that license.
 
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geezer36

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Nov 29, 2008
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Around here you can't work on a gas line or appliance without a special gas license- most plumbers have that license.

I bought a natural gas Weber grill 10 years and it came with two orifices. I still have the propane orifice in case I want to go back to propane. There ought to be replacement orifice kits out there somewhere.
 

Nitt1300

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Nov 2, 2008
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I bought a natural gas Weber grill 10 years and it came with two orifices. I still have the propane orifice in case I want to go back to propane. There ought to be replacement orifice kits out there somewhere.
There are. And I'd do it myself, because my dad taught me and he was in the propane business- but I'd be illegal doing it here. The code in PA may be different.
 

Nittany Ned2

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Dec 16, 2005
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I bought the E330 (natural gas) several yrs ago. It's awesome. I use it to cook turkey at thanksgiving, rib roasts at Christmas and ribs/ brisket in the Summer....and even pizza.

I also ordered the stainless pkg. (grates & flab bars). The stainless makes it much easier to clean. I just put everything in the oven and turn on the self cleaning cycle... Easy-Peazy

Lately, I was checking out an aftermarket attachment that turned it into a smoker.

Smachtlict!
 

ClarkstonMark

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May 23, 2002
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I did the reverse (NG to propane) on a Viking grill 12 years ago. Was easy, and no issues since.
I have been to lazy to go back to the original NG and hook it up in new house, but that is on my list.
 

hawkeyePSU

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Gold Member
Dec 28, 2004
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Columbus, Ohio
Just curious if anyone has done the above? I bought a new home a couple months ago and they have a natural gas hookup for the grill. My Weber Genesis E-330 is for a propane setup. I contacted Weber about a conversion kit and they told me they don't offer them and can't legally suggest I do the conversion. I see where Home Depot and Lowes both sell conversion kits (along with my local Ace who sells Webers).

I went online and watched a number of video's and it seems pretty straight forward, but wanted to see if anyone has actually done this and if so, how did it go? My other option is taking this grill down the shore and replacing my old Weber down there and buying a whole new natural gas Weber. This is a last resort since the one I currently have and am looking to convert is only 8 months old.

Thanks in advance!

I was given a Weber Genesis Silver that was configured for natural gas. I use propane and all i had to do to convert it is buy an adjustable regulator for about $40. Works great. You could probably do the same thing to go from propane to NG.
 

psu1969a

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May 19, 2013
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I just checked Youtube.com. There are many videos on the topic. I certainly think this is a DIY job with some basic tools.

What's the worst that can happen, an overcooked burnt steak. lol

Worst case: burn your house down and maybe a few of the neighbors.
 

Ps Slu

New Member
Dec 29, 2012
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Jon, it is rather easy if you have the original manufact specs . 1 you need to enlarge the orifices . Use the specs to get the but rating for natural gas and there should be a chart for the New size or you can get said chart online very easy I would try 14 or 18 drill size these are pretty standard for grills. 2 replace regulator with a 1/2 in maxitrol regulator which u can purchase at a plumbing supply house and that is all u need to do. I do have a chart if you post I will let u know what size drill and how to do it.
 

91Joe95

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Aug 15, 2003
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Its simple. Never mess with a tank again, which is actually far more dangerous. Propane is heavier than air, which means it hugs the ground and does not dissipate easily if there is a leak. It has a higher btu value, so it does burn a little hotter than natural gas, but not enough to really matter. As others have pointed out, orifice size is what matters.
 

kgilbert78

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Apr 9, 2013
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Worst case: burn your house down and maybe a few of the neighbors.
Natural_gas_may_have_caused_massive_expl_2737810000_15381365_ver1.0_320_240.jpg


Workers accidentally opened an abandoned line (was marked as water) and did not notice the leak.... Knocked other houses nearby off their foundations.

So I'd be careful with a gas line.