CNN: This is the absolute worst case scenario for Democrats on Build Back Better

Sullivan

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This is the absolute worst case scenario for Democrats on Build Back Better

(CNN)It's hard to dream up a worse scenario for Democrats.

They spent months openly fighting among themselves about the cost and parameters of the social spending bill known as Build Back Better.

Liberals said they wouldn't vote for a separate infrastructure bill unless they had absolute assurances that moderates in the Senate -- namely West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin -- would, eventually, vote for the broader (and more expensive) BBB measure.

They did so only reluctantly following President Joe Biden's publicly expressed confidence that a deal would get done.


The bill then went to the Senate for what wound up being a very extended public debate in which the same old rifts between moderates and liberals were exposed.

Then, on Sunday, Manchin killed the bill.

CNN's Chris Cillizza cuts through the political spin and tells you what you need to know.


"I cannot vote to continue with this piece of legislation," he said during an appearance on "Fox News Sunday." "I just can't. I've tried everything humanly possible. I can't get there. This is a no on this legislation. I have tried everything I know to do."

It was an abrupt and disastrous end for a bill that, in no small measure, contained the bulk of the Biden agenda for his first term in office.

Not only do Democrats have zero to show for what has dominated debate -- in Congress and nationally -- for months on end, but they have also either created or exasperated several major political problems in the process:

1) Every House Democrat -- save Rep. Jared Golden of Maine -- voted for the Build Back Better bill. That includes plenty of moderates and other members in swing seats who now have to a) own any and all negative aspects of the bill without b) reaping the political benefits of the more popular elements of the legislation. That walk-the-plank vote is just the sort of thing that leadership tries to avoid. If a vulnerable member is going to cast a tough vote, then you want to ensure that it's not going to just wither on the vine in the Senate -- leaving those members hanging out to dry.

2) Distrust between Democrats in the House and Senate, liberals and moderates and the White House and Manchin is now at all-time highs. "If his comments on FOX and written statement indicate an end to that effort, they represent a sudden and inexplicable reversal in his position, and a breach of his commitments to the President and the Senator's colleagues in the House and Senate," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement issued in the immediate aftermath of Manchin's announced opposition to the BBB. Others, like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, lashed out at Manchin: "[Manchin is] gonna have a lot of explaining to do to the people of West Virginia," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday.

3) Biden looks weak. Remember that so much of liberals agreeing to vote for the infrastructure bill without the social safety net legislation having already passed was dependent on their trust in Biden -- and that he could find a way to make a deal with Manchin as well as Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema. This was, after all, at the core of Biden's promise when he was elected, that he -- thanks to decades of experience in the Senate and as vice president -- was uniquely positioned to land big deals for the country. But, in retrospect, it appears as though Biden badly misjudged the situation. In an interview with West Virginia radio host Hoppy Kercheval on Monday morning, Manchin said Democratic leaders knew where he stood all along. "I was at $1.5 from the beginning," Manchin said. "I gave (Senate Majority Leader Chuck) Schumer exactly the philosophical beliefs and the amount of money that I thought we could raise and pay for everything. So they've had that from Day 1, on July 2020, of this year. He's had that."

And it's important to remember that Democrats -- led by Biden -- didn't start this whole debate from a
position of strength, politically speaking. Biden's approval numbers were on the way down and most nonpartisan analysts were predicting that Democrats would likely lose at least their House majority next November.

They end this debacle in 2021 in far worse shape. The coronavirus is raging yet again. Biden's approval numbers are even lower. Retirements from within the Democratic ranks are coming fast and furious.
It's all bad for Democrats. And it's hard to imagine how these last few months could have gone any worse for the party in power.

 

m.knox

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This is the absolute worst case scenario for Democrats on Build Back Better

(CNN)It's hard to dream up a worse scenario for Democrats.

They spent months openly fighting among themselves about the cost and parameters of the social spending bill known as Build Back Better.

Liberals said they wouldn't vote for a separate infrastructure bill unless they had absolute assurances that moderates in the Senate -- namely West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin -- would, eventually, vote for the broader (and more expensive) BBB measure.

They did so only reluctantly following President Joe Biden's publicly expressed confidence that a deal would get done.


The bill then went to the Senate for what wound up being a very extended public debate in which the same old rifts between moderates and liberals were exposed.

Then, on Sunday, Manchin killed the bill.

CNN's Chris Cillizza cuts through the political spin and tells you what you need to know.


"I cannot vote to continue with this piece of legislation," he said during an appearance on "Fox News Sunday." "I just can't. I've tried everything humanly possible. I can't get there. This is a no on this legislation. I have tried everything I know to do."

It was an abrupt and disastrous end for a bill that, in no small measure, contained the bulk of the Biden agenda for his first term in office.

Not only do Democrats have zero to show for what has dominated debate -- in Congress and nationally -- for months on end, but they have also either created or exasperated several major political problems in the process:

1) Every House Democrat -- save Rep. Jared Golden of Maine -- voted for the Build Back Better bill. That includes plenty of moderates and other members in swing seats who now have to a) own any and all negative aspects of the bill without b) reaping the political benefits of the more popular elements of the legislation. That walk-the-plank vote is just the sort of thing that leadership tries to avoid. If a vulnerable member is going to cast a tough vote, then you want to ensure that it's not going to just wither on the vine in the Senate -- leaving those members hanging out to dry.

2) Distrust between Democrats in the House and Senate, liberals and moderates and the White House and Manchin is now at all-time highs. "If his comments on FOX and written statement indicate an end to that effort, they represent a sudden and inexplicable reversal in his position, and a breach of his commitments to the President and the Senator's colleagues in the House and Senate," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement issued in the immediate aftermath of Manchin's announced opposition to the BBB. Others, like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, lashed out at Manchin: "[Manchin is] gonna have a lot of explaining to do to the people of West Virginia," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday.

3) Biden looks weak. Remember that so much of liberals agreeing to vote for the infrastructure bill without the social safety net legislation having already passed was dependent on their trust in Biden -- and that he could find a way to make a deal with Manchin as well as Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema. This was, after all, at the core of Biden's promise when he was elected, that he -- thanks to decades of experience in the Senate and as vice president -- was uniquely positioned to land big deals for the country. But, in retrospect, it appears as though Biden badly misjudged the situation. In an interview with West Virginia radio host Hoppy Kercheval on Monday morning, Manchin said Democratic leaders knew where he stood all along. "I was at $1.5 from the beginning," Manchin said. "I gave (Senate Majority Leader Chuck) Schumer exactly the philosophical beliefs and the amount of money that I thought we could raise and pay for everything. So they've had that from Day 1, on July 2020, of this year. He's had that."

And it's important to remember that Democrats -- led by Biden -- didn't start this whole debate from a
position of strength, politically speaking. Biden's approval numbers were on the way down and most nonpartisan analysts were predicting that Democrats would likely lose at least their House majority next November.

They end this debacle in 2021 in far worse shape. The coronavirus is raging yet again. Biden's approval numbers are even lower. Retirements from within the Democratic ranks are coming fast and furious.
It's all bad for Democrats. And it's hard to imagine how these last few months could have gone any worse for the party in power.


Biden "looks weak?".......

Biden IS weak.
 

2lion70

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Jul 1, 2004
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This is the absolute worst case scenario for Democrats on Build Back Better

(CNN)It's hard to dream up a worse scenario for Democrats.

They spent months openly fighting among themselves about the cost and parameters of the social spending bill known as Build Back Better.

Liberals said they wouldn't vote for a separate infrastructure bill unless they had absolute assurances that moderates in the Senate -- namely West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin -- would, eventually, vote for the broader (and more expensive) BBB measure.

They did so only reluctantly following President Joe Biden's publicly expressed confidence that a deal would get done.


The bill then went to the Senate for what wound up being a very extended public debate in which the same old rifts between moderates and liberals were exposed.

Then, on Sunday, Manchin killed the bill.

CNN's Chris Cillizza cuts through the political spin and tells you what you need to know.


"I cannot vote to continue with this piece of legislation," he said during an appearance on "Fox News Sunday." "I just can't. I've tried everything humanly possible. I can't get there. This is a no on this legislation. I have tried everything I know to do."

It was an abrupt and disastrous end for a bill that, in no small measure, contained the bulk of the Biden agenda for his first term in office.

Not only do Democrats have zero to show for what has dominated debate -- in Congress and nationally -- for months on end, but they have also either created or exasperated several major political problems in the process:

1) Every House Democrat -- save Rep. Jared Golden of Maine -- voted for the Build Back Better bill. That includes plenty of moderates and other members in swing seats who now have to a) own any and all negative aspects of the bill without b) reaping the political benefits of the more popular elements of the legislation. That walk-the-plank vote is just the sort of thing that leadership tries to avoid. If a vulnerable member is going to cast a tough vote, then you want to ensure that it's not going to just wither on the vine in the Senate -- leaving those members hanging out to dry.

2) Distrust between Democrats in the House and Senate, liberals and moderates and the White House and Manchin is now at all-time highs. "If his comments on FOX and written statement indicate an end to that effort, they represent a sudden and inexplicable reversal in his position, and a breach of his commitments to the President and the Senator's colleagues in the House and Senate," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement issued in the immediate aftermath of Manchin's announced opposition to the BBB. Others, like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, lashed out at Manchin: "[Manchin is] gonna have a lot of explaining to do to the people of West Virginia," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday.

3) Biden looks weak. Remember that so much of liberals agreeing to vote for the infrastructure bill without the social safety net legislation having already passed was dependent on their trust in Biden -- and that he could find a way to make a deal with Manchin as well as Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema. This was, after all, at the core of Biden's promise when he was elected, that he -- thanks to decades of experience in the Senate and as vice president -- was uniquely positioned to land big deals for the country. But, in retrospect, it appears as though Biden badly misjudged the situation. In an interview with West Virginia radio host Hoppy Kercheval on Monday morning, Manchin said Democratic leaders knew where he stood all along. "I was at $1.5 from the beginning," Manchin said. "I gave (Senate Majority Leader Chuck) Schumer exactly the philosophical beliefs and the amount of money that I thought we could raise and pay for everything. So they've had that from Day 1, on July 2020, of this year. He's had that."

And it's important to remember that Democrats -- led by Biden -- didn't start this whole debate from a
position of strength, politically speaking. Biden's approval numbers were on the way down and most nonpartisan analysts were predicting that Democrats would likely lose at least their House majority next November.

They end this debacle in 2021 in far worse shape. The coronavirus is raging yet again. Biden's approval numbers are even lower. Retirements from within the Democratic ranks are coming fast and furious.
It's all bad for Democrats. And it's hard to imagine how these last few months could have gone any worse for the party in power.

After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no. If you look at the states that would benefit a lot of them are red. The vote should be for country and citizens, not party.
 

Sullivan

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After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no. If you look at the states that would benefit a lot of them are red. The vote should be for country and citizens, not party.

No, the real drama is coming from the D's :rolleyes:
 

Sullivan

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Nov 24, 2001
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After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no. If you look at the states that would benefit a lot of them are red. The vote should be for country and citizens, not party.

I really don't understand this group of D's. Why do they believe they are so smart that they can just pi$$ away another $2 to $8 trillion and pretend that it is some type of magical investment that they are making into our countries future.

Where have we heard this before? I'm sure that the same politicians that have racked up $30 trillion in federal debt thought the same thing.
 

2lion70

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I really don't understand this group of D's. Why do they believe they are so smart that they can just pi$$ away another $2 to $8 trillion and pretend that it is some type of magical investment that they are making into our countries future.

Where have we heard this before? I'm sure that the same politicians that have racked up $30 trillion in federal debt thought the same thing.
The CBO and others who has evaluated the BBB have said it pays for itself and is even anti-inflationary.
 
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Obliviax

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After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no. If you look at the states that would benefit a lot of them are red. The vote should be for country and citizens, not party.
LOL...it is so funny to watch the GOP take Dem talking points when their person gets elected, and the Dems to take GOP talking points when a Dem gets elected. 12 months ago you were saying the exact opposite.

Fact is, Biden promised on BBB and isn't going to deliver anything close to what he committed. he said he'd lick COVID (and cancer too)! today, foreign policy is in a shambles (even he didn't list AF as one of his accomplishments in 2021), COVID is raging (more deaths under Biden than Trump even with a Vaccine), and the economy teeters under inflation not seen in 30 years.

Let's go Brandon! It isn't a cheer, it is a demand! It should be "Brandon, WTF are you doing!?!"
 

franklinman

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This is the absolute worst case scenario for Democrats on Build Back Better

(CNN)It's hard to dream up a worse scenario for Democrats.

They spent months openly fighting among themselves about the cost and parameters of the social spending bill known as Build Back Better.

Liberals said they wouldn't vote for a separate infrastructure bill unless they had absolute assurances that moderates in the Senate -- namely West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin -- would, eventually, vote for the broader (and more expensive) BBB measure.

They did so only reluctantly following President Joe Biden's publicly expressed confidence that a deal would get done.


The bill then went to the Senate for what wound up being a very extended public debate in which the same old rifts between moderates and liberals were exposed.

Then, on Sunday, Manchin killed the bill.

CNN's Chris Cillizza cuts through the political spin and tells you what you need to know.


"I cannot vote to continue with this piece of legislation," he said during an appearance on "Fox News Sunday." "I just can't. I've tried everything humanly possible. I can't get there. This is a no on this legislation. I have tried everything I know to do."

It was an abrupt and disastrous end for a bill that, in no small measure, contained the bulk of the Biden agenda for his first term in office.

Not only do Democrats have zero to show for what has dominated debate -- in Congress and nationally -- for months on end, but they have also either created or exasperated several major political problems in the process:

1) Every House Democrat -- save Rep. Jared Golden of Maine -- voted for the Build Back Better bill. That includes plenty of moderates and other members in swing seats who now have to a) own any and all negative aspects of the bill without b) reaping the political benefits of the more popular elements of the legislation. That walk-the-plank vote is just the sort of thing that leadership tries to avoid. If a vulnerable member is going to cast a tough vote, then you want to ensure that it's not going to just wither on the vine in the Senate -- leaving those members hanging out to dry.

2) Distrust between Democrats in the House and Senate, liberals and moderates and the White House and Manchin is now at all-time highs. "If his comments on FOX and written statement indicate an end to that effort, they represent a sudden and inexplicable reversal in his position, and a breach of his commitments to the President and the Senator's colleagues in the House and Senate," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement issued in the immediate aftermath of Manchin's announced opposition to the BBB. Others, like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, lashed out at Manchin: "[Manchin is] gonna have a lot of explaining to do to the people of West Virginia," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday.

3) Biden looks weak. Remember that so much of liberals agreeing to vote for the infrastructure bill without the social safety net legislation having already passed was dependent on their trust in Biden -- and that he could find a way to make a deal with Manchin as well as Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema. This was, after all, at the core of Biden's promise when he was elected, that he -- thanks to decades of experience in the Senate and as vice president -- was uniquely positioned to land big deals for the country. But, in retrospect, it appears as though Biden badly misjudged the situation. In an interview with West Virginia radio host Hoppy Kercheval on Monday morning, Manchin said Democratic leaders knew where he stood all along. "I was at $1.5 from the beginning," Manchin said. "I gave (Senate Majority Leader Chuck) Schumer exactly the philosophical beliefs and the amount of money that I thought we could raise and pay for everything. So they've had that from Day 1, on July 2020, of this year. He's had that."

And it's important to remember that Democrats -- led by Biden -- didn't start this whole debate from a
position of strength, politically speaking. Biden's approval numbers were on the way down and most nonpartisan analysts were predicting that Democrats would likely lose at least their House majority next November.

They end this debacle in 2021 in far worse shape. The coronavirus is raging yet again. Biden's approval numbers are even lower. Retirements from within the Democratic ranks are coming fast and furious.
It's all bad for Democrats. And it's hard to imagine how these last few months could have gone any worse for the party in power.

And every con has run away from a very positive bill BBB, the whole country wants by a large margin. We also saw many cons TRY, I SAY TRY to take credit for the infrastructure bill that passed by the dems. The country will take it out on the cons come Nov, 22. after voting NO when the bill is put on the floor. VOTERS VOTE their wallet.
 

Obliviax

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And every con has run away from a very positive bill the whole country wants by a large margin. We also saw many cons TRY, I SAY TRY to take credit for the infrastructure bill that passed by the dems. The country will take it out on the cons come Nov, 22. after voting NO when the bill is put on the floor.
huh? NPR:

Democrats have staked their political future on enacting President Biden's plans for trillions in social spending, but a new NPR/Marist poll shows that most voters are skeptical of the party's proposals.
Just 41% of the survey's respondents said they support the Build Back Better bill, the roughly $2 trillion bill currently being negotiated in Congress. Nearly three-quarters of all Democrats said the support the bill but only 36% of independents and 13% of Republicans agreed.​
 
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psu skp

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50 yard line after dark
After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no.
"You know, that old chestnut"

dr-evil-scar.jpg
 
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Ski

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I really don't understand this group of D's. Why do they believe they are so smart that they can just pi$$ away another $2 to $8 trillion and pretend that it is some type of magical investment that they are making into our countries future.

Where have we heard this before? I'm sure that the same politicians that have racked up $30 trillion in federal debt thought the same thing.

They know that in order to make people willing to replace the system they need to crash the system. They are doing their damndest to crash it in record time.
 

junior1

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After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no. If you look at the states that would benefit a lot of them are red. The vote should be for country and citizens, not party.
Well, to be fair, according to senator romney, he thought there was a compromise on the child tax credit, but democrats didn't include republicans on any of the discussions or drafting of the bill. You haven't heard of negotiations between republicans and democrats.....only between progressive, liberal, and moderate democrats.
So, dems went at this alone...can't now point the finger at republicans.
Besides, putting together a massive bill this big is not the right way to run a government. you include so many "puff" items that would never pass on their own but cost the taxpayers
 
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royboy

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The CBO and others who has evaluated the BBB have said it pays for itself and is even anti-inflationary.
Oh, please.

‘Build Back Better’ Programs Will Add $3 Trillion to Deficit if Made Permanent, CBO Projects​


CBO issues score on how much Build Back Better would cost if programs were permanent​

 

pawrestlersintn

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And every con has run away from a very positive bill BBB, the whole country wants by a large margin. We also saw many cons TRY, I SAY TRY to take credit for the infrastructure bill that passed by the dems. The country will take it out on the cons come Nov, 22. after voting NO when the bill is put on the floor. VOTERS VOTE their wallet.
So, somehow in your feeble mind, you see Biden's poll numbers drop like a rock, but think at the same time, BBB is wildly popular? How, exactly, does that work?
 

roswelllion

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After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no. If you look at the states that would benefit a lot of them are red. The vote should be for country and citizens, not party.
Says the guy who supported straight party line impeachment and opposition to SCOTUS. lol
 

HartfordLlion

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After all is said and done the real cause for all this drama are the 50 Repubs that as a group have decided to be the party of no. If you look at the states that would benefit a lot of them are red. The vote should be for country and citizens, not party.
It's no different than what Trump had to deal with in his last two years. Only difference is Dems are trying to pass a piece of legislation that is 180 degree on just about every issue from where Reps stand.
 
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bdgan

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This is the absolute worst case scenario for Democrats on Build Back Better

(CNN)It's hard to dream up a worse scenario for Democrats.

They spent months openly fighting among themselves about the cost and parameters of the social spending bill known as Build Back Better.

Liberals said they wouldn't vote for a separate infrastructure bill unless they had absolute assurances that moderates in the Senate -- namely West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin -- would, eventually, vote for the broader (and more expensive) BBB measure.

They did so only reluctantly following President Joe Biden's publicly expressed confidence that a deal would get done.


The bill then went to the Senate for what wound up being a very extended public debate in which the same old rifts between moderates and liberals were exposed.

Then, on Sunday, Manchin killed the bill.

CNN's Chris Cillizza cuts through the political spin and tells you what you need to know.


"I cannot vote to continue with this piece of legislation," he said during an appearance on "Fox News Sunday." "I just can't. I've tried everything humanly possible. I can't get there. This is a no on this legislation. I have tried everything I know to do."

It was an abrupt and disastrous end for a bill that, in no small measure, contained the bulk of the Biden agenda for his first term in office.

Not only do Democrats have zero to show for what has dominated debate -- in Congress and nationally -- for months on end, but they have also either created or exasperated several major political problems in the process:

1) Every House Democrat -- save Rep. Jared Golden of Maine -- voted for the Build Back Better bill. That includes plenty of moderates and other members in swing seats who now have to a) own any and all negative aspects of the bill without b) reaping the political benefits of the more popular elements of the legislation. That walk-the-plank vote is just the sort of thing that leadership tries to avoid. If a vulnerable member is going to cast a tough vote, then you want to ensure that it's not going to just wither on the vine in the Senate -- leaving those members hanging out to dry.

2) Distrust between Democrats in the House and Senate, liberals and moderates and the White House and Manchin is now at all-time highs. "If his comments on FOX and written statement indicate an end to that effort, they represent a sudden and inexplicable reversal in his position, and a breach of his commitments to the President and the Senator's colleagues in the House and Senate," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement issued in the immediate aftermath of Manchin's announced opposition to the BBB. Others, like Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, lashed out at Manchin: "[Manchin is] gonna have a lot of explaining to do to the people of West Virginia," Sanders told CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday.

3) Biden looks weak. Remember that so much of liberals agreeing to vote for the infrastructure bill without the social safety net legislation having already passed was dependent on their trust in Biden -- and that he could find a way to make a deal with Manchin as well as Arizona Sen. Kyrsten Sinema. This was, after all, at the core of Biden's promise when he was elected, that he -- thanks to decades of experience in the Senate and as vice president -- was uniquely positioned to land big deals for the country. But, in retrospect, it appears as though Biden badly misjudged the situation. In an interview with West Virginia radio host Hoppy Kercheval on Monday morning, Manchin said Democratic leaders knew where he stood all along. "I was at $1.5 from the beginning," Manchin said. "I gave (Senate Majority Leader Chuck) Schumer exactly the philosophical beliefs and the amount of money that I thought we could raise and pay for everything. So they've had that from Day 1, on July 2020, of this year. He's had that."

And it's important to remember that Democrats -- led by Biden -- didn't start this whole debate from a
position of strength, politically speaking. Biden's approval numbers were on the way down and most nonpartisan analysts were predicting that Democrats would likely lose at least their House majority next November.

They end this debacle in 2021 in far worse shape. The coronavirus is raging yet again. Biden's approval numbers are even lower. Retirements from within the Democratic ranks are coming fast and furious.
It's all bad for Democrats. And it's hard to imagine how these last few months could have gone any worse for the party in power.

Biden is a unifier
Biden brings people together
Biden works across the isle to get things done

He told us so himself.
 
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HartfordLlion

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$367 billion is not paying for itself.


Dems failure was totally self inflicted. Manchin tells House Dems the initial bill is to expensive and needs to pay for itself. So the House Dems in their infinite stupidity keep the revenue side at 10 years and cut programs to a few years, in some cases only one year to try and make it fit Manchin requirements. Only an idiot would think this ploy is ok. Obviously Manchin is no idiot.
 

bdgan

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May 29, 2008
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It's no different than what Trump had to deal with in his last two years. Only difference is Dems are trying to pass a piece of legislation that is 180 degree on just about every issue from where Reps stand.
Not to mention the dishonesty in the bill. It didn't pay for itself even if the major programs died after 1-3 years. Nobody believes these programs would be allowed to die so the real cost was nearly $5 trillion.

The sad part is that Pelosi openly admitted she was going to use this dishonest tactic.
 

BUFFALO LION

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Oct 4, 2001
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And every con has run away from a very positive bill BBB, the whole country wants by a large margin. We also saw many cons TRY, I SAY TRY to take credit for the infrastructure bill that passed by the dems. The country will take it out on the cons come Nov, 22. after voting NO when the bill is put on the floor. VOTERS VOTE their wallet.

[“A very positive BBB, the whole country wants by a large margin”?? ] ???????

What “whole country”????? China? Russia? Iran?

The whole freakin thing reeks of a giant Communist Manifesto. You Left Wing nut bags are complete Marxist lunnies.

Manchin’s the only person in your Party with half a brain. Without him, you guys would have taxed and regulated us into historic oblivion.
 
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franklinman

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Well it seems Manchin called Biden yesterday and wants a meeting with him discussing the BBB bill. He thinks the 2 can pass something, not everything, and Biden seems ok with that, the other dems ,who knows.
 

The Spin Meister

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Nov 27, 2012
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An altered state
Dems failure was totally self inflicted. Manchin tells House Dems the initial bill is to expensive and needs to pay for itself. So the House Dems in their infinite stupidity keep the revenue side at 10 years and cut programs to a few years, in some cases only one year to try and make it fit Manchin requirements. Only an idiot would think this ploy is ok. Obviously Manchin is no idiot.
And 90% of the d party buy it. Including most of the 🤡 here. Including the paid off talking heads in the media telling the idiots what to believe.
 

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