B1G wrestling coverage in trouble

slushhead

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2014
3,048
7,195
1
Big Ten Network Sued by Major Insurance Companies



September 18, 2021



Chicago, IL – College wrestling fans across the country may be dealt yet another blow to their hopes of enjoying their favorite sport during the recent era of the coronavirus pandemic. After a cancellation of the national championships in 2020, a plethora of team quarantines and canceled events during the 2020-21 season, and an asterisked 2021 national championship marred by the absence of the Ivy League, the Big Ten Network (BTN) is now at risk of being forced to cancel its television and live-streaming coverage of college wrestling’s most powerful conference this upcoming season. In an unprecedented move, a consortium of the nation’s leading insurance companies has filed a lawsuit that places blame on the BTN for billions of dollars in claims-related losses. If successful, the lawsuit could bankrupt the BTN, or else require suspension of all wrestling broadcasts by the network.



What is behind the lawsuit? According to court documents obtained by the SP, the insurance companies are alleging that scheduled BTN wrestling broadcasts delayed by late-running women’s basketball games are triggering massive spikes in claims for loss of personal property. The alleged rise in claims has been particularly severe during the past year, as the nation – and especially wrestling fans, who are known widely for being thin-skinned – struggle with deteriorating mental health during the pandemic.



According to a company source not authorized to speak on the matter, the insurance companies conducted a 5-year study of personal property claims and noticed “strange irregularities” in the data. Further analysis revealed spikes in claims in the days immediately following BTN wrestling broadcasts that had been delayed by women’s basketball games, and especially games in which the outcome was a foregone conclusion. Follow-up investigations confirmed that most such claims were made by wrestling fans.



“It [the correlation] was actually pretty easy to confirm, once I hit upon a hunch” said the source, who also happens to be a wrestling fan.



“The light came on after I had to file a claim myself, when I was forced by the BTN to throw my television through a window. I mean, come on, there is no way Ohio State is overcoming a 15-point deficit in 73 seconds! Does the BTN really have to continue coverage of the 6-plus minutes it will take for the game to become official, because Ohio State fouls every 2 seconds, and only to see its deficit increase? That’s ridiculous. They cost me all of Spencer’s match, plus the first period of ADS! Luckily, I at least had a second TV in the house. But, anyway, this made me realize BTN needed to be held responsible for my loss, and it dawned upon me that there must be thousands of victims like me. When I went to work the next day, I started looking at the numbers, and sure enough, it all lined up.”



According to the source, the claims are astronomical in the Midwest, especially in Pennsylvania. The insurance companies are not willing to raise coverage premiums, and they believe it is the responsibility of the BTN to exercise better judgment to promote responsible behavior by its customers. If BTN is forced to suspend wrestling broadcasts, the potential fallout for teams is uncertain.



Penn State and Iowa, the two most dominant teams in the Big Ten Conference over the past decade, do not want to see reduced coverage, as they are committed to growing the sport and increasing its popularity among prospective fans. However, it is unclear whether the BTN would stubbornly hold onto its broadcast rights, even if not permitted to exercise them. Such a scenario could see Penn State and/or Iowa petition for their wrestling teams to leave the conference, which would be devastating blow to the Big Ten. As noted recently by one professional journalist, “Major s—t going down rn [right now]. B1G related.”



If Penn State or Iowa are thinking of jumping ship, their head coaches are not providing many clues. When asked about the matter in a joint press conference, Penn State head coach Cael Sanderson replied, “Well, we are always grateful for the opportunity to perform and promote the sport on any stage. It is a process, and we will look at everything.” Followed by, “Why, do you have a plan?”



After an awkward moment of silence, Iowa head coach Tom Brands jumped in. “Hey, look, we like our guys. We know the BTN has work to do. We have work to do. We need to keep moving forward.”



An off-mic shout, “The BTN doesn’t like tough wrestling!” was then heard from behind the stage.



Where the lawsuit goes from here is anyone’s guess, but other corporations are reportedly getting involved. For example, there are rumors that furniture, electronics, and home improvement companies – who stand to lose revenue if the BTN’s practice of allowing basketball games to cut into wrestling coverage is suspended – are exploring options for teaming with the network or funding its defense. PETA and the SPCA are rumored to be working on a similar suit against the BTN.



For wrestling fans, the matter just adds more uncertainty to a time rife with anxiety and depression. Remarked one fan, “What the heck am I supposed to do if BTN stops broadcasting wrestling? Read a book? Become a Lehigh fan? Sit around and watch paint dry?”



Whatever the outcome, the BTN is receiving fire from all sides. In a similar lawsuit, Michigan and Ohio State football fans are seeking damages for live wrestling broadcasts cutting into re-runs of “The Ten Year War: Woody vs. Bo”.



We are living in interesting times, and the BTN is faced with a daunting task of trying to please everybody. Or else.
 

backdrft76

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Sep 7, 2012
1,417
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tenor.gif
 

nittinsc

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Aug 21, 2017
1,416
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If this isn't bad enough, it's being reported elsewhere that BTN has retained Flo Karen to represent them.
 
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JTNPSU84

Well-Known Member
Jan 5, 2019
80
126
1
Big Ten Network Sued by Major Insurance Companies



September 18, 2021



Chicago, IL – College wrestling fans across the country may be dealt yet another blow to their hopes of enjoying their favorite sport during the recent era of the coronavirus pandemic. After a cancellation of the national championships in 2020, a plethora of team quarantines and canceled events during the 2020-21 season, and an asterisked 2021 national championship marred by the absence of the Ivy League, the Big Ten Network (BTN) is now at risk of being forced to cancel its television and live-streaming coverage of college wrestling’s most powerful conference this upcoming season. In an unprecedented move, a consortium of the nation’s leading insurance companies has filed a lawsuit that places blame on the BTN for billions of dollars in claims-related losses. If successful, the lawsuit could bankrupt the BTN, or else require suspension of all wrestling broadcasts by the network.



What is behind the lawsuit? According to court documents obtained by the SP, the insurance companies are alleging that scheduled BTN wrestling broadcasts delayed by late-running women’s basketball games are triggering massive spikes in claims for loss of personal property. The alleged rise in claims has been particularly severe during the past year, as the nation – and especially wrestling fans, who are known widely for being thin-skinned – struggle with deteriorating mental health during the pandemic.



According to a company source not authorized to speak on the matter, the insurance companies conducted a 5-year study of personal property claims and noticed “strange irregularities” in the data. Further analysis revealed spikes in claims in the days immediately following BTN wrestling broadcasts that had been delayed by women’s basketball games, and especially games in which the outcome was a foregone conclusion. Follow-up investigations confirmed that most such claims were made by wrestling fans.



“It [the correlation] was actually pretty easy to confirm, once I hit upon a hunch” said the source, who also happens to be a wrestling fan.



“The light came on after I had to file a claim myself, when I was forced by the BTN to throw my television through a window. I mean, come on, there is no way Ohio State is overcoming a 15-point deficit in 73 seconds! Does the BTN really have to continue coverage of the 6-plus minutes it will take for the game to become official, because Ohio State fouls every 2 seconds, and only to see its deficit increase? That’s ridiculous. They cost me all of Spencer’s match, plus the first period of ADS! Luckily, I at least had a second TV in the house. But, anyway, this made me realize BTN needed to be held responsible for my loss, and it dawned upon me that there must be thousands of victims like me. When I went to work the next day, I started looking at the numbers, and sure enough, it all lined up.”



According to the source, the claims are astronomical in the Midwest, especially in Pennsylvania. The insurance companies are not willing to raise coverage premiums, and they believe it is the responsibility of the BTN to exercise better judgment to promote responsible behavior by its customers. If BTN is forced to suspend wrestling broadcasts, the potential fallout for teams is uncertain.



Penn State and Iowa, the two most dominant teams in the Big Ten Conference over the past decade, do not want to see reduced coverage, as they are committed to growing the sport and increasing its popularity among prospective fans. However, it is unclear whether the BTN would stubbornly hold onto its broadcast rights, even if not permitted to exercise them. Such a scenario could see Penn State and/or Iowa petition for their wrestling teams to leave the conference, which would be devastating blow to the Big Ten. As noted recently by one professional journalist, “Major s—t going down rn [right now]. B1G related.”



If Penn State or Iowa are thinking of jumping ship, their head coaches are not providing many clues. When asked about the matter in a joint press conference, Penn State head coach Cael Sanderson replied, “Well, we are always grateful for the opportunity to perform and promote the sport on any stage. It is a process, and we will look at everything.” Followed by, “Why, do you have a plan?”



After an awkward moment of silence, Iowa head coach Tom Brands jumped in. “Hey, look, we like our guys. We know the BTN has work to do. We have work to do. We need to keep moving forward.”



An off-mic shout, “The BTN doesn’t like tough wrestling!” was then heard from behind the stage.



Where the lawsuit goes from here is anyone’s guess, but other corporations are reportedly getting involved. For example, there are rumors that furniture, electronics, and home improvement companies – who stand to lose revenue if the BTN’s practice of allowing basketball games to cut into wrestling coverage is suspended – are exploring options for teaming with the network or funding its defense. PETA and the SPCA are rumored to be working on a similar suit against the BTN.



For wrestling fans, the matter just adds more uncertainty to a time rife with anxiety and depression. Remarked one fan, “What the heck am I supposed to do if BTN stops broadcasting wrestling? Read a book? Become a Lehigh fan? Sit around and watch paint dry?”



Whatever the outcome, the BTN is receiving fire from all sides. In a similar lawsuit, Michigan and Ohio State football fans are seeking damages for live wrestling broadcasts cutting into re-runs of “The Ten Year War: Woody vs. Bo”.



We are living in interesting times, and the BTN is faced with a daunting task of trying to please everybody. Or else.
Well done.
 
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tullfan68

Well-Known Member
Gold Member
Jun 20, 2021
1,181
691
1
Big Ten Network Sued by Major Insurance Companies



September 18, 2021



Chicago, IL – College wrestling fans across the country may be dealt yet another blow to their hopes of enjoying their favorite sport during the recent era of the coronavirus pandemic. After a cancellation of the national championships in 2020, a plethora of team quarantines and canceled events during the 2020-21 season, and an asterisked 2021 national championship marred by the absence of the Ivy League, the Big Ten Network (BTN) is now at risk of being forced to cancel its television and live-streaming coverage of college wrestling’s most powerful conference this upcoming season. In an unprecedented move, a consortium of the nation’s leading insurance companies has filed a lawsuit that places blame on the BTN for billions of dollars in claims-related losses. If successful, the lawsuit could bankrupt the BTN, or else require suspension of all wrestling broadcasts by the network.



What is behind the lawsuit? According to court documents obtained by the SP, the insurance companies are alleging that scheduled BTN wrestling broadcasts delayed by late-running women’s basketball games are triggering massive spikes in claims for loss of personal property. The alleged rise in claims has been particularly severe during the past year, as the nation – and especially wrestling fans, who are known widely for being thin-skinned – struggle with deteriorating mental health during the pandemic.



According to a company source not authorized to speak on the matter, the insurance companies conducted a 5-year study of personal property claims and noticed “strange irregularities” in the data. Further analysis revealed spikes in claims in the days immediately following BTN wrestling broadcasts that had been delayed by women’s basketball games, and especially games in which the outcome was a foregone conclusion. Follow-up investigations confirmed that most such claims were made by wrestling fans.



“It [the correlation] was actually pretty easy to confirm, once I hit upon a hunch” said the source, who also happens to be a wrestling fan.



“The light came on after I had to file a claim myself, when I was forced by the BTN to throw my television through a window. I mean, come on, there is no way Ohio State is overcoming a 15-point deficit in 73 seconds! Does the BTN really have to continue coverage of the 6-plus minutes it will take for the game to become official, because Ohio State fouls every 2 seconds, and only to see its deficit increase? That’s ridiculous. They cost me all of Spencer’s match, plus the first period of ADS! Luckily, I at least had a second TV in the house. But, anyway, this made me realize BTN needed to be held responsible for my loss, and it dawned upon me that there must be thousands of victims like me. When I went to work the next day, I started looking at the numbers, and sure enough, it all lined up.”



According to the source, the claims are astronomical in the Midwest, especially in Pennsylvania. The insurance companies are not willing to raise coverage premiums, and they believe it is the responsibility of the BTN to exercise better judgment to promote responsible behavior by its customers. If BTN is forced to suspend wrestling broadcasts, the potential fallout for teams is uncertain.



Penn State and Iowa, the two most dominant teams in the Big Ten Conference over the past decade, do not want to see reduced coverage, as they are committed to growing the sport and increasing its popularity among prospective fans. However, it is unclear whether the BTN would stubbornly hold onto its broadcast rights, even if not permitted to exercise them. Such a scenario could see Penn State and/or Iowa petition for their wrestling teams to leave the conference, which would be devastating blow to the Big Ten. As noted recently by one professional journalist, “Major s—t going down rn [right now]. B1G related.”



If Penn State or Iowa are thinking of jumping ship, their head coaches are not providing many clues. When asked about the matter in a joint press conference, Penn State head coach Cael Sanderson replied, “Well, we are always grateful for the opportunity to perform and promote the sport on any stage. It is a process, and we will look at everything.” Followed by, “Why, do you have a plan?”



After an awkward moment of silence, Iowa head coach Tom Brands jumped in. “Hey, look, we like our guys. We know the BTN has work to do. We have work to do. We need to keep moving forward.”



An off-mic shout, “The BTN doesn’t like tough wrestling!” was then heard from behind the stage.



Where the lawsuit goes from here is anyone’s guess, but other corporations are reportedly getting involved. For example, there are rumors that furniture, electronics, and home improvement companies – who stand to lose revenue if the BTN’s practice of allowing basketball games to cut into wrestling coverage is suspended – are exploring options for teaming with the network or funding its defense. PETA and the SPCA are rumored to be working on a similar suit against the BTN.



For wrestling fans, the matter just adds more uncertainty to a time rife with anxiety and depression. Remarked one fan, “What the heck am I supposed to do if BTN stops broadcasting wrestling? Read a book? Become a Lehigh fan? Sit around and watch paint dry?”



Whatever the outcome, the BTN is receiving fire from all sides. In a similar lawsuit, Michigan and Ohio State football fans are seeking damages for live wrestling broadcasts cutting into re-runs of “The Ten Year War: Woody vs. Bo”.



We are living in interesting times, and the BTN is faced with a daunting task of trying to please everybody. Or else.
LOL WHEN THEY HAVE A TIME START THEY SHOULD STICK WITH IT MOST OF THE CRAP THEY SHOW ON THE BIG NO ONE WANTS TO WATCH START MATCHES ON TIME!!
 

pawrestlersintn

Well-Known Member
Jan 26, 2013
15,437
22,633
1
Big Ten Network Sued by Major Insurance Companies



September 18, 2021



Chicago, IL – College wrestling fans across the country may be dealt yet another blow to their hopes of enjoying their favorite sport during the recent era of the coronavirus pandemic. After a cancellation of the national championships in 2020, a plethora of team quarantines and canceled events during the 2020-21 season, and an asterisked 2021 national championship marred by the absence of the Ivy League, the Big Ten Network (BTN) is now at risk of being forced to cancel its television and live-streaming coverage of college wrestling’s most powerful conference this upcoming season. In an unprecedented move, a consortium of the nation’s leading insurance companies has filed a lawsuit that places blame on the BTN for billions of dollars in claims-related losses. If successful, the lawsuit could bankrupt the BTN, or else require suspension of all wrestling broadcasts by the network.



What is behind the lawsuit? According to court documents obtained by the SP, the insurance companies are alleging that scheduled BTN wrestling broadcasts delayed by late-running women’s basketball games are triggering massive spikes in claims for loss of personal property. The alleged rise in claims has been particularly severe during the past year, as the nation – and especially wrestling fans, who are known widely for being thin-skinned – struggle with deteriorating mental health during the pandemic.



According to a company source not authorized to speak on the matter, the insurance companies conducted a 5-year study of personal property claims and noticed “strange irregularities” in the data. Further analysis revealed spikes in claims in the days immediately following BTN wrestling broadcasts that had been delayed by women’s basketball games, and especially games in which the outcome was a foregone conclusion. Follow-up investigations confirmed that most such claims were made by wrestling fans.



“It [the correlation] was actually pretty easy to confirm, once I hit upon a hunch” said the source, who also happens to be a wrestling fan.



“The light came on after I had to file a claim myself, when I was forced by the BTN to throw my television through a window. I mean, come on, there is no way Ohio State is overcoming a 15-point deficit in 73 seconds! Does the BTN really have to continue coverage of the 6-plus minutes it will take for the game to become official, because Ohio State fouls every 2 seconds, and only to see its deficit increase? That’s ridiculous. They cost me all of Spencer’s match, plus the first period of ADS! Luckily, I at least had a second TV in the house. But, anyway, this made me realize BTN needed to be held responsible for my loss, and it dawned upon me that there must be thousands of victims like me. When I went to work the next day, I started looking at the numbers, and sure enough, it all lined up.”



According to the source, the claims are astronomical in the Midwest, especially in Pennsylvania. The insurance companies are not willing to raise coverage premiums, and they believe it is the responsibility of the BTN to exercise better judgment to promote responsible behavior by its customers. If BTN is forced to suspend wrestling broadcasts, the potential fallout for teams is uncertain.



Penn State and Iowa, the two most dominant teams in the Big Ten Conference over the past decade, do not want to see reduced coverage, as they are committed to growing the sport and increasing its popularity among prospective fans. However, it is unclear whether the BTN would stubbornly hold onto its broadcast rights, even if not permitted to exercise them. Such a scenario could see Penn State and/or Iowa petition for their wrestling teams to leave the conference, which would be devastating blow to the Big Ten. As noted recently by one professional journalist, “Major s—t going down rn [right now]. B1G related.”



If Penn State or Iowa are thinking of jumping ship, their head coaches are not providing many clues. When asked about the matter in a joint press conference, Penn State head coach Cael Sanderson replied, “Well, we are always grateful for the opportunity to perform and promote the sport on any stage. It is a process, and we will look at everything.” Followed by, “Why, do you have a plan?”



After an awkward moment of silence, Iowa head coach Tom Brands jumped in. “Hey, look, we like our guys. We know the BTN has work to do. We have work to do. We need to keep moving forward.”



An off-mic shout, “The BTN doesn’t like tough wrestling!” was then heard from behind the stage.



Where the lawsuit goes from here is anyone’s guess, but other corporations are reportedly getting involved. For example, there are rumors that furniture, electronics, and home improvement companies – who stand to lose revenue if the BTN’s practice of allowing basketball games to cut into wrestling coverage is suspended – are exploring options for teaming with the network or funding its defense. PETA and the SPCA are rumored to be working on a similar suit against the BTN.



For wrestling fans, the matter just adds more uncertainty to a time rife with anxiety and depression. Remarked one fan, “What the heck am I supposed to do if BTN stops broadcasting wrestling? Read a book? Become a Lehigh fan? Sit around and watch paint dry?”



Whatever the outcome, the BTN is receiving fire from all sides. In a similar lawsuit, Michigan and Ohio State football fans are seeking damages for live wrestling broadcasts cutting into re-runs of “The Ten Year War: Woody vs. Bo”.



We are living in interesting times, and the BTN is faced with a daunting task of trying to please everybody. Or else.
He doesn't always post, but when he does, it's classic. Good to see you, Slush.
 

NoVa Lion

Well-Known Member
May 29, 2001
10,084
5,423
1
Big Ten Network Sued by Major Insurance Companies



September 18, 2021



Chicago, IL – College wrestling fans across the country may be dealt yet another blow to their hopes of enjoying their favorite sport during the recent era of the coronavirus pandemic. After a cancellation of the national championships in 2020, a plethora of team quarantines and canceled events during the 2020-21 season, and an asterisked 2021 national championship marred by the absence of the Ivy League, the Big Ten Network (BTN) is now at risk of being forced to cancel its television and live-streaming coverage of college wrestling’s most powerful conference this upcoming season. In an unprecedented move, a consortium of the nation’s leading insurance companies has filed a lawsuit that places blame on the BTN for billions of dollars in claims-related losses. If successful, the lawsuit could bankrupt the BTN, or else require suspension of all wrestling broadcasts by the network.



What is behind the lawsuit? According to court documents obtained by the SP, the insurance companies are alleging that scheduled BTN wrestling broadcasts delayed by late-running women’s basketball games are triggering massive spikes in claims for loss of personal property. The alleged rise in claims has been particularly severe during the past year, as the nation – and especially wrestling fans, who are known widely for being thin-skinned – struggle with deteriorating mental health during the pandemic.



According to a company source not authorized to speak on the matter, the insurance companies conducted a 5-year study of personal property claims and noticed “strange irregularities” in the data. Further analysis revealed spikes in claims in the days immediately following BTN wrestling broadcasts that had been delayed by women’s basketball games, and especially games in which the outcome was a foregone conclusion. Follow-up investigations confirmed that most such claims were made by wrestling fans.



“It [the correlation] was actually pretty easy to confirm, once I hit upon a hunch” said the source, who also happens to be a wrestling fan.



“The light came on after I had to file a claim myself, when I was forced by the BTN to throw my television through a window. I mean, come on, there is no way Ohio State is overcoming a 15-point deficit in 73 seconds! Does the BTN really have to continue coverage of the 6-plus minutes it will take for the game to become official, because Ohio State fouls every 2 seconds, and only to see its deficit increase? That’s ridiculous. They cost me all of Spencer’s match, plus the first period of ADS! Luckily, I at least had a second TV in the house. But, anyway, this made me realize BTN needed to be held responsible for my loss, and it dawned upon me that there must be thousands of victims like me. When I went to work the next day, I started looking at the numbers, and sure enough, it all lined up.”



According to the source, the claims are astronomical in the Midwest, especially in Pennsylvania. The insurance companies are not willing to raise coverage premiums, and they believe it is the responsibility of the BTN to exercise better judgment to promote responsible behavior by its customers. If BTN is forced to suspend wrestling broadcasts, the potential fallout for teams is uncertain.



Penn State and Iowa, the two most dominant teams in the Big Ten Conference over the past decade, do not want to see reduced coverage, as they are committed to growing the sport and increasing its popularity among prospective fans. However, it is unclear whether the BTN would stubbornly hold onto its broadcast rights, even if not permitted to exercise them. Such a scenario could see Penn State and/or Iowa petition for their wrestling teams to leave the conference, which would be devastating blow to the Big Ten. As noted recently by one professional journalist, “Major s—t going down rn [right now]. B1G related.”



If Penn State or Iowa are thinking of jumping ship, their head coaches are not providing many clues. When asked about the matter in a joint press conference, Penn State head coach Cael Sanderson replied, “Well, we are always grateful for the opportunity to perform and promote the sport on any stage. It is a process, and we will look at everything.” Followed by, “Why, do you have a plan?”



After an awkward moment of silence, Iowa head coach Tom Brands jumped in. “Hey, look, we like our guys. We know the BTN has work to do. We have work to do. We need to keep moving forward.”



An off-mic shout, “The BTN doesn’t like tough wrestling!” was then heard from behind the stage.



Where the lawsuit goes from here is anyone’s guess, but other corporations are reportedly getting involved. For example, there are rumors that furniture, electronics, and home improvement companies – who stand to lose revenue if the BTN’s practice of allowing basketball games to cut into wrestling coverage is suspended – are exploring options for teaming with the network or funding its defense. PETA and the SPCA are rumored to be working on a similar suit against the BTN.



For wrestling fans, the matter just adds more uncertainty to a time rife with anxiety and depression. Remarked one fan, “What the heck am I supposed to do if BTN stops broadcasting wrestling? Read a book? Become a Lehigh fan? Sit around and watch paint dry?”



Whatever the outcome, the BTN is receiving fire from all sides. In a similar lawsuit, Michigan and Ohio State football fans are seeking damages for live wrestling broadcasts cutting into re-runs of “The Ten Year War: Woody vs. Bo”.



We are living in interesting times, and the BTN is faced with a daunting task of trying to please everybody. Or else.

Man, this really stinks. I guess I should cancel my BTN+ subscription. LOL :cool:
 

NoVaLion2

Well-Known Member
Feb 22, 2018
506
724
1
First time back in months... THIS, is the first post I read. :) It's good to be back. Thanks Andy "Slushead" Borowitz.
 
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