B1G Expansion

NedFromYork

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Aug 29, 2001
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At this point I think Oregon and Washington are inevitable and will be good adds. I am hoping if Clemson+ do go to the SEC, that Virginia ultimately chooses B1G. Hoping the next four for B1G are Oregon, Washington, Notre Dame, and Virginia. Might have to add Stanford to get Notre Dame and I guess that would be okay, hard to argue against Stanford's all around sports success and San Francisco and Oakland TV markets but those are pro towns.

I think the B1G and SEC will go to 24 each, each four divisions with six teams. The four division winners make a conference playoff along with two wild cards and then the two conference champions play each other. An NFL type model. The B1G is the North and West, the SEC the South.

21-24 for the B1G. Colorado seems very likely. North Carolina if they don't go SEC. Arizona (Phoenix) and Utah (Salt Lake City) possible for land bridges to California. Oklahoma State maybe, gives you some Texas exposure. Boston College (Boston), maybe.
 

Roar More

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Aug 19, 2004
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Oregon & Washington legislatures may require their respective state schools stay together. That could throw a monkey wrench into northwest expansion.
 

LandoComando

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At this point I think Oregon and Washington are inevitable and will be good adds. I am hoping if Clemson+ do go to the SEC, that Virginia ultimately chooses B1G. Hoping the next four for B1G are Oregon, Washington, Notre Dame, and Virginia. Might have to add Stanford to get Notre Dame and I guess that would be okay, hard to argue against Stanford's all around sports success and San Francisco and Oakland TV markets but those are pro towns.

I think the B1G and SEC will go to 24 each, each four divisions with six teams. The four division winners make a conference playoff along with two wild cards and then the two conference champions play each other. An NFL type model. The B1G is the North and West, the SEC the South.

21-24 for the B1G. Colorado seems very likely. North Carolina if they don't go SEC. Arizona (Phoenix) and Utah (Salt Lake City) possible for land bridges to California. Oklahoma State maybe, gives you some Texas exposure. Boston College (Boston), maybe.
Miami is highly likely for the Big Ten IMO
Va Tech and Arizona State seem more likely for me than Virginia (SEC bound) and Arizona.
Anything is possible but it seems like then next 4 for each are....
SEC--Virginia, North Carolina, Clemson and Florida State
Big Ten--Notre Dame, Miami, Oregon & Washington

Then

SEC--Oklahoma State, Baylor, Arizona State & Houston
Big Ten--Stanford, Colorado, Georgia Tech & Boston College (ND would love Stanford and BC joining)

UNLV might end up being highly sought after too
 

Sullivan

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Nov 24, 2001
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Miami is highly likely for the Big Ten IMO
Va Tech and Arizona State seem more likely for me than Virginia (SEC bound) and Arizona.
Anything is possible but it seems like then next 4 for each are....
SEC--Virginia, North Carolina, Clemson and Florida State
Big Ten--Notre Dame, Miami, Oregon & Washington

Then

SEC--Oklahoma State, Baylor, Arizona State & Houston
Big Ten--Stanford, Colorado, Georgia Tech & Boston College (ND would love Stanford and BC joining)

UNLV might end up being highly sought after too

Unless a school can add at least $125+ million annually to the Big 10, they aren't getting an invitation.

And from your list, I don't see many schools adding that much revenue.
 

Agoodnap

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Sep 27, 2015
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At this point I think Oregon and Washington are inevitable and will be good adds. I am hoping if Clemson+ do go to the SEC, that Virginia ultimately chooses B1G. Hoping the next four for B1G are Oregon, Washington, Notre Dame, and Virginia. Might have to add Stanford to get Notre Dame and I guess that would be okay, hard to argue against Stanford's all around sports success and San Francisco and Oakland TV markets but those are pro towns.

I think the B1G and SEC will go to 24 each, each four divisions with six teams. The four division winners make a conference playoff along with two wild cards and then the two conference champions play each other. An NFL type model. The B1G is the North and West, the SEC the South.

21-24 for the B1G. Colorado seems very likely. North Carolina if they don't go SEC. Arizona (Phoenix) and Utah (Salt Lake City) possible for land bridges to California. Oklahoma State maybe, gives you some Texas exposure. Boston College (Boston), maybe.
Serious question...Are there any large cities that aren't "pro towns"? The only one I can think of may be Columbus.
 
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LandoComando

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Unless a school can add at least $125+ million annually to the Big 10, they aren't getting an invitation.

And from your list, I don't see many schools adding that much revenue.
That's not true--you still don't seem to accepted what's happening here
 

doctornick

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Sep 4, 2007
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Serious question...Are there any large cities that aren't "pro towns"? The only one I can think of may be Columbus.
Columbus has NHL and MLS teams.

One could consider Riverside (Inland Empire) as being the largest metro without a pro team, though it's generally considered part of the expanded Los Angeles area.

If you discount MLS, Austin is the largest city without a 4 major sports team (though it's sometimes considered part of the San Antonio metro)

Norfolk/Virginia Beach is generally considered the largest metro without a pro team.
 

doctornick

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Unless a school can add at least $125+ million annually to the Big 10, they aren't getting an invitation.

And from your list, I don't see many schools adding that much revenue.

Yeah, I don't really get people tossing out the names of schools who will clearly decrease revenues for current members by adding them. That's not the name of the game here. The Big Ten and SEC already have dominant positions in the sport in terms of their influence. Once they pick off the remaining top tier teams (Notre Dame, Clemson, maybe Florida St), they will have so much control that expanding further only dilutes things.
 

Sullivan

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That's not true--you still don't seem to accepted what's happening here

The only thing that is being "accepted" is in your mind.

Let's use Boston College as an example. At best, BC will generate $50 million per year to the conference (it's probably less than that). If the average Big 10 school brings in $125 million per year, the conference members will have the privilege of writing BC a check for $5 million each, so that BC can join the Big 10 conference.

Gee, maybe we can bring in Syracuse too. They would probably bring in $30 million. We can write a check to them for $6 million, so that we can say they are in the conference too.

By adding these two schools, the payout to each school decreases from $125 million to $114 million. That doesn't make a lot of sense :rolleyes:
 
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Wallace Breen

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The only thing that is being "accepted" is in your mind.

Let's use Boston College as an example. At best, BC will generate $50 million per year to the conference (it's probably less than that). If the average Big 10 school brings in $125 million per year, the conference members will have the privilege of writing BC a check for $5 million each, so that BC can join the Big 10 conference.

Gee, maybe we can bring in Syracuse too. They would probably bring in at least $30 million. We can write a check to them for $6 million, so that we can say they are in the conference too.
There is something bigger going on here that most people aren't seeing yet. In all likelihood, they badly misjudged the intent behind behind the three conference alliance that was announced a few months ago. I think this is the three primarily academic conference's attempt to regain control of college athletics first and foremost. Short term, the moves may focus on revenue to establish a new league featuring four 10 team conferences funneling their champions into the Rose bowl as the new national championship, while excluding the SEC altogether. Most people realize that the SEC is the tool that all the bad actors, grifters and other various parasites use to access college athletics.
 

LandoComando

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The only thing that is being "accepted" is in your mind.

Let's use Boston College as an example. At best, BC will generate $50 million per year to the conference (it's probably less than that). If the average Big 10 school brings in $125 million per year, the conference members will have the privilege of writing BC a check for $5 million each, so that BC can join the Big 10 conference.

Gee, maybe we can bring in Syracuse too. They would probably bring in $30 million. We can write a check to them for $6 million, so that we can say they are in the conference too.

By adding these two schools, the payout to each school decreases from $125 million to $114 million. That doesn't make a lot of sense :rolleyes:
You're still thinking of these as conferences instead of breaking away from the NCAA/FBS. It's about the Big Ten/SEC creating two very large conferences and running their own league. No one is going to lose any money once that happens and they get the new TV deal. Players will be paid handsomely as well.
 

LandoComando

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Yeah, I don't really get people tossing out the names of schools who will clearly decrease revenues for current members by adding them. That's not the name of the game here. The Big Ten and SEC already have dominant positions in the sport in terms of their influence. Once they pick off the remaining top tier teams (Notre Dame, Clemson, maybe Florida St), they will have so much control that expanding further only dilutes things.
Watch & see. The SEC and Big Ten have bigger plans. Listen to those in the know. There's a reason Notre Dame is actually considering it now. They know there's no other option.
 
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OaktonDave

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Oct 18, 2007
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Miami is highly likely for the Big Ten IMO
Va Tech and Arizona State seem more likely for me than Virginia (SEC bound) and Arizona.
Anything is possible but it seems like then next 4 for each are....
SEC--Virginia, North Carolina, Clemson and Florida State
Big Ten--Notre Dame, Miami, Oregon & Washington

Then

SEC--Oklahoma State, Baylor, Arizona State & Houston
Big Ten--Stanford, Colorado, Georgia Tech & Boston College (ND would love Stanford and BC joining)

UNLV might end up being highly sought after too
UVA is not a good fit for the SEC. Their approach to academics and athletics is closer to Cal, Stanford, and Duke, and the fanbase is not rabid when it comes to football. If one of the two VA schools ends up in the SEC, it will be VT. VT is a large state school that starts its campus visit tours for prospective students in a luxury suite at the football stadium. They market the idea of joining a large community of Hokie students and alumni hard, and their sports programs are a big part of that. None of that is UVA's style. Think Frank Beamer vs Thomas Jefferson and decide which school is more SEC.

I don't see Houston going anywhere, at least not before Texas Tech. UT and TAMU are the big dogs in Texas. Baylor has just enough association with the Southern Baptists to keep it near the top, then comes TT. If anyone is thinking about the Houston market, UH delivers it only slightly better than Temple delivers Philadelphia.
 

ryoder1

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Feb 17, 2007
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The only thing that is being "accepted" is in your mind.

Let's use Boston College as an example. At best, BC will generate $50 million per year to the conference (it's probably less than that). If the average Big 10 school brings in $125 million per year, the conference members will have the privilege of writing BC a check for $5 million each, so that BC can join the Big 10 conference.

Gee, maybe we can bring in Syracuse too. They would probably bring in $30 million. We can write a check to them for $6 million, so that we can say they are in the conference too.

By adding these two schools, the payout to each school decreases from $125 million to $114 million. That doesn't make a lot of sense :rolleyes:
Shouldn't we be kicking out at least half the B10 schools then? What keeps them in?
 

Wallace Breen

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Mar 11, 2016
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Miami is highly likely for the Big Ten IMO
Va Tech and Arizona State seem more likely for me than Virginia (SEC bound) and Arizona.
Anything is possible but it seems like then next 4 for each are....
SEC--Virginia, North Carolina, Clemson and Florida State
Big Ten--Notre Dame, Miami, Oregon & Washington

Then

SEC--Oklahoma State, Baylor, Arizona State & Houston
Big Ten--Stanford, Colorado, Georgia Tech & Boston College (ND would love Stanford and BC joining)

UNLV might end up being highly sought after too
End of the day, if things take a decidedly academic turn, and I know people that expect just that to happen, we'll likely see some combination of ACC teams Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Duke, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Boston College and Syracuse joining Notre Dame from the east, while Stanford, Cal, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, and possible Oregon State and/or Arizona State from the west with Texas, Missouri, Colorado, Kansas and maybe Missouri from the fly over states. I think a new league is coming that will return college football closer to the roots rather than the money obsessed spectacle it is now. Think about a 4 conference league with 8 - 10 teams aligned geographically with an inter-region game played pitting the 1 seed against the 4 and the 2 against the 3 with the winners playing the Big Ten championship in the Rose Bowl and the preservation of the bowl system. You preserve traditional rivalries across the board, you continue to play the key smaller conferences and cut out the SEC and let them wither and die as there isn't nearly as much interest in SEC football outside the southeast as ESPN thinks there is.

Pacific Coast

UCLA
Stanford
USC
California
Oregon
Washington
Arizona
Oregon State
Washington State

Big 8

Texas
Texas A&M
Missouri
Nebraska
Kansas
Colorado
Arizona State
Baylor

Big Ten

Michigan
Michigan State
Ohio State
Indiana
Purdue
Northwestern
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Wisconsin

East Coast Conference

Penn State
Maryland
Notre Dame
Virginia
Virginia Tech
North Carolina
Duke
Syracuse
Boston College
Georgia Tech
 

ryoder1

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Feb 17, 2007
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End of the day, if things take a decidedly academic turn, and I know people that expect just that to happen, we'll likely see some combination of ACC teams Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Duke, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Boston College and Syracuse joining Notre Dame from the east, while Stanford, Cal, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, and possible Oregon State and/or Arizona State from the west with Texas, Missouri, Colorado, Kansas and maybe Missouri from the fly over states. I think a new league is coming that will return college football closer to the roots rather than the money obsessed spectacle it is now. Think about a 4 conference league with 8 - 10 teams aligned geographically with an inter-region game played pitting the 1 seed against the 4 and the 2 against the 3 with the winners playing the Big Ten championship in the Rose Bowl and the preservation of the bowl system. You preserve traditional rivalries across the board, you continue to play the key smaller conferences and cut out the SEC and let them wither and die as there isn't nearly as much interest in SEC football outside the southeast as ESPN thinks there is.

Pacific Coast

UCLA
Stanford
USC
California
Oregon
Washington
Arizona
Oregon State
Washington State

Big 8

Texas
Texas A&M
Missouri
Nebraska
Kansas
Colorado
Arizona State
Baylor

Big Ten

Michigan
Michigan State
Ohio State
Indiana
Purdue
Northwestern
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Wisconsin

East Coast Conference

Penn State
Maryland
Notre Dame
Virginia
Virginia Tech
North Carolina
Duke
Syracuse
Boston College
Georgia Tech
So every other school outside the 16 SEC teams in the B10 conference? Also not sure how this supports the "academic turn" approach. Hmmm, no so sure this is where we end up. Go back to giving Franklin his performance review.
 

doctornick

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Sep 4, 2007
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Shouldn't we be kicking out at least half the B10 schools then? What keeps them in?

Tradition. And it's a lot different to retain schools you already are working with than it is to bring in new schools with which you don't have that connection. No one would want to vote any school out lest you be the next one on the list to be removed; it's in everyone's interest to have a "all members are kept" policy for stability and security, even if some do not pull their weight.
 

Wallace Breen

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Mar 11, 2016
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So every other school outside the 16 SEC teams in the B10 conference? Also not sure how this supports the "academic turn" approach. Hmmm, no so sure this is where we end up. Go back to giving Franklin his performance review.
I am not sure where things are going but have been hearing things form well placed people. I think we are heading towards 36 to 40 team league that crowns its own championship in football, a more exclusive basketball tournament and revamped Olympic sports and with it, severely limiting the portal, a common standard for NIL and a return to the bowl system for the post season.
 

PSUSignore

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May 29, 2001
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Miami is highly likely for the Big Ten IMO
Va Tech and Arizona State seem more likely for me than Virginia (SEC bound) and Arizona.
Anything is possible but it seems like then next 4 for each are....
SEC--Virginia, North Carolina, Clemson and Florida State
Big Ten--Notre Dame, Miami, Oregon & Washington

Then

SEC--Oklahoma State, Baylor, Arizona State & Houston
Big Ten--Stanford, Colorado, Georgia Tech & Boston College (ND would love Stanford and BC joining)

UNLV might end up being highly sought after too
Miami is a not an AAU member and a poor cultural fit. They would be a better fit in the SEC. I'd also say a bad geographic fit but that seems to be of little importance now. UVA is a much better fit in the Big 10 and is an AAU member, but athletically doesn't bring big dollars and viewership to the table. VT and ASU are not in AAU and as a result are unlikely.
 
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SheldonJoe2215

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Portland, OR
There are a few posters in this thread that have a very active imaginations.
LOL. I am waiting for the Big East 3.0 once the ACC loses members and implodes. Off the top of my mind, you have Pitt, BC, Syracuse, Virginia Tech looking for homes. Uconn is always looking for a landing spot and it probably wouldn't take much to lure WVU.
 

Wallace Breen

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Mar 11, 2016
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Miami is a not an AAU member and a poor cultural fit. They would be a better fit in the SEC. I'd also say a bad geographic fit but that seems to be of little importance now. UVA is a much better fit in the Big 10 and is an AAU member, but athletically doesn't bring big dollars and viewership to the table. VT and ASU are not in AAU and as a result are unlikely.
If they go big with a capital B, AAU membership will not matter except to the traditional Big Ten portion.
 

KCLion

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Jun 8, 2001
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End of the day, if things take a decidedly academic turn, and I know people that expect just that to happen, we'll likely see some combination of ACC teams Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Duke, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Boston College and Syracuse joining Notre Dame from the east, while Stanford, Cal, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, and possible Oregon State and/or Arizona State from the west with Texas, Missouri, Colorado, Kansas and maybe Missouri from the fly over states. I think a new league is coming that will return college football closer to the roots rather than the money obsessed spectacle it is now. Think about a 4 conference league with 8 - 10 teams aligned geographically with an inter-region game played pitting the 1 seed against the 4 and the 2 against the 3 with the winners playing the Big Ten championship in the Rose Bowl and the preservation of the bowl system. You preserve traditional rivalries across the board, you continue to play the key smaller conferences and cut out the SEC and let them wither and die as there isn't nearly as much interest in SEC football outside the southeast as ESPN thinks there is.

Pacific Coast

UCLA
Stanford
USC
California
Oregon
Washington
Arizona
Oregon State
Washington State

Big 8

Texas
Texas A&M
Missouri
Nebraska
Kansas
Colorado
Arizona State
Baylor

Big Ten

Michigan
Michigan State
Ohio State
Indiana
Purdue
Northwestern
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Wisconsin

East Coast Conference

Penn State
Maryland
Notre Dame
Virginia
Virginia Tech
North Carolina
Duke
Syracuse
Boston College
Georgia
No message
 

LandoComando

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Nov 29, 2021
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UVA is not a good fit for the SEC. Their approach to academics and athletics is closer to Cal, Stanford, and Duke, and the fanbase is not rabid when it comes to football. If one of the two VA schools ends up in the SEC, it will be VT. VT is a large state school that starts its campus visit tours for prospective students in a luxury suite at the football stadium. They market the idea of joining a large community of Hokie students and alumni hard, and their sports programs are a big part of that. None of that is UVA's style. Think Frank Beamer vs Thomas Jefferson and decide which school is more SEC.

I don't see Houston going anywhere, at least not before Texas Tech. UT and TAMU are the big dogs in Texas. Baylor has just enough association with the Southern Baptists to keep it near the top, then comes TT. If anyone is thinking about the Houston market, UH delivers it only slightly better than Temple delivers Philadelphia.
Houston has money. Houston >>>> Texas Tech.
And the SEC supposedly want UVa, UNC, Clemson and FSU. There's reasons behind that. It's not just about "elite programs" or "academics" or "rabid fan bases". In the past, I would have agreed with you.
Hell, the Big Ten should consider Houston and Baylor truthfully
 
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LandoComando

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Miami is a not an AAU member and a poor cultural fit. They would be a better fit in the SEC. I'd also say a bad geographic fit but that seems to be of little importance now. UVA is a much better fit in the Big 10 and is an AAU member, but athletically doesn't bring big dollars and viewership to the table. VT and ASU are not in AAU and as a result are unlikely.
AAU no longer matters--at all
 
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HailToPitt725

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May 16, 2016
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Question: assuming the SEC goes after Clemson, Florida State, and Miami, what value do ACC schools bring the Big Ten that Oregon and Washington? I can see the argument for North Carolina, but those two PAC-12 schools dwarf the others (e.g. Georgia Tech, Virginia) in both tv ratings and revenue generated.
 

LandoComando

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Question: assuming the SEC goes after Clemson, Florida State, and Miami, what value do ACC schools bring the Big Ten that Oregon and Washington? I can see the argument for North Carolina, but those two PAC-12 schools dwarf the others (e.g. Georgia Tech, Virginia) in both tv ratings and revenue generated.
I don't believe the SEC takes Miami and Florida State--seems like only one and that's FSU. Notre Dame's decision will dictate next steps but I'd be shocked if Washington and Oregon aren't eventually in the Big Ten
 

Obliviax

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Would you have said that 10 years ago if someone said UCLA/USC would be in The Big Ten?
It is very clear that there are two major conferences: SEC and B1G. There is a single secondary conference in the ACC (basketball, Clemson, and half of ND). This brings up several questions:
  1. can the ACC sustain with basketball and Clemson?
  2. If not, that leaves Clemson and ND (football) without a chair when the music stops. Natural fit is ND to B1G and Clemson to the SEC.
  3. It is now being reported the Big 12 is in negotiations to add Cincy, Arizona, Arizona State, Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Utah potentially.
  4. Now you have a bunch of mid-grade teams but simply none of them have the strength of the new B1G and SEC.
  5. If the B1G adds ND and SEC adds Clemson what is left? Oregon & Stanford would be the last true football powers on the board.
  6. These teams are simply not going to drive TV revenues. While teams like Oregon, Stanford and Utah jump up from time to time, they just don't have the TV or stadiums to sustain what the big two can do.
  7. Even mid-tier B1G teams like Sparty, Wisconsin, Nebraska, and Iowa will drive more revenue playing a PSU/tOSU/UM/USC/UCLA than Oregon vs Stanford.
That is why I think there is still a lot of sorting out yet to come but it is really over. We see where this is going. The only other possibility is that a conference like the Big 12 adds everyone that is left.
 
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cvilleelkscoach

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I don't believe the SEC takes Miami and Florida State--seems like only one and that's FSU. Notre Dame's decision will dictate next steps but I'd be shocked if Washington and Oregon aren't eventually in the Big Ten
Prepare to be shocked. They are headed to big 12
 

doctornick

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Sep 4, 2007
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Prepare to be shocked. They are headed to big 12
I wouldn't be surprised if UW and Oregon end up in an enlarged Big 12 with other Pac-12 schools, but I would be surprised if they would make any long term commitment (i.e. signing a GOR for an extended period) while the Big Ten is seemingly in play for them.

The four corners PAC-12 schools probably already realize that the Big Ten isn't going to come a calling anytime soon and would trade over their rights for stability though.
 

Obliviax

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Aug 21, 2001
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I wouldn't be surprised if UW and Oregon end up in an enlarged Big 12 with other Pac-12 schools, but I would be surprised if they would make any long term commitment (i.e. signing a GOR for an extended period) while the Big Ten is seemingly in play for them.

The four corners PAC-12 schools probably already realize that the Big Ten isn't going to come a calling anytime soon and would trade over their rights for stability though.
Agree. the big enchilada is ND. And they present a problem because you don't want to add one team. It is much easier to add even numbers of teams. But with ND, you'd make the exception.

ND is the log jam. When that log jam is cleared, I think you see a lot more action for Oregon, Washington, and Stanford.
 
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NedFromYork

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Aug 29, 2001
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It would be easier for the PAC12 to go after two of BYU, Texas Tech, New Mexico, Baylor types than a bunch of them go to the B12. I don't see how the B12 is more stable than PAC.

I believe Washington and Oregon will be announced for B1G in about a month. Give USC and UCLA their time in the limelight and the B1G in the newscycle. Hopefully Notre Dame (and maybe Stanford) after that. Virginia is going to take a Clemson(+) bolt to the SEC first.
 
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