10,000 on ignore, Book 200, Gethsemane, Part 3.....

Ten Thousan Marbles

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TTM note: Turns out that there is reason Trump brought up the pee tapes. LULZ.


Former British spy Christopher Steele is stepping out of the shadows to "set the record straight" about his bombshell dossier for the first time since his name splashed across headlines in early 2017, defending his work, his name, and the decision to include some of its most controversial elements.

"I stand by the work we did, the sources that we had, and the professionalism which we applied to it," Steele told ABC News' George Stephanopoulos in the forthcoming documentary, "Out of the Shadows: The Man Behind the Steele Dossier" -- an exclusive preview of which aired Sunday on "This Week with George Stephanopoulos."

In his first major interview, Steele described how and why he wrote the 17 reports that made up the so-called "Steele dossier," which accused former President Donald Trump's campaign of conspiring with the Russians to tilt the result of the 2016 election.

Steele’s dossier has come under immense scrutiny since its release. And yet in many ways, it proved prescient. The Mueller probe found that Russia had been making efforts to meddle in the 2016 campaign, and that Trump campaign members and surrogates had promoted and retweeted Russian-produced political content alleging voter fraud and criminal activity on the part of Hillary Clinton.

Investigators determined there had been "numerous links -- i.e. contacts -- between Trump campaign officials and individuals having ties to the Russian government." And, proof emerged that the Trump Organization had been discussing a real estate deal in Moscow during the campaign.

All were findings that had been signaled, at least broadly, in Steele’s work.

Steele continues to defend the inclusion of some of the dossier’s more controversial claims, including that Michael Cohen, Trump's former personal attorney and self-described fixer, traveled to Prague in 2016 for secret meetings with Russian interlocutors -- a claim that Cohen has vehemently denied, and that the FBI later determined not to be true.

"Do you think it hurts your credibility at all that you won't accept the findings of the FBI in this particular case?" Stephanopoulos asked.

"I'm prepared to accept that not everything in the dossier is 100% accurate," Steele said. "I have yet to be convinced that that is one of them."

Asked for comment regarding Steele, Cohen told ABC News sarcastically that "I eagerly await his next secret dossier which proves the existence of Bigfoot, the Loch Ness Monster and that Elvis is still alive."

While Steele acknowledged that no corroborating evidence has been found for many of his dossier claims, he argued that very little contradictory evidence exists either -- a line of defense that his critics have found problematic.

"Christopher Steele is free to believe whatever he wants, but if Christopher Steele wants other people to believe that he's believable, he needs to show us what evidence he has to support his beliefs," said Barry Meier, author of "Spooked: The Trump Dossier, Black Cube, and the Rise of Private Spies," and a vocal critic of Steele's.

Perhaps the most attention-grabbing headline from the Steele dossier -- and another claim that remains uncorroborated -- was a report of the supposed existence of a "pee tape" allegedly collected by Russian intelligence services. According to the dossier, the tape purportedly shows Trump "employing a number of prostitutes to perform a 'golden showers' (urination) show in front of him" on a bed where the Obamas supposedly once stayed.

Steele told ABC News he believes the alleged tape "probably does" exist -- but that he "wouldn't put 100% certainty on it."

Trump has repeatedly denied the existence of the alleged pee-tape, including in comments last week, when he reportedly told donors at a private speech, "I'm not into golden showers."

The claim of an alleged tape has attracted scrutiny not only from Steele's critics, but also from his own primary source -- a so-called "collector" who traveled to Moscow on Steele's behalf and collected intelligence about Trump from other sources. It was from the collector that Steele received much of the information highlighted in the dossier, including claims of the alleged pee tape.

This collector told FBI agents he "felt that the tenor of Steele's reports was far more 'conclusive' than was justified," and that much of the information he had provided -- including word of the purported "pee tape" -- came from "word of mouth and hearsay ... conversation that [he/she] had with friends over beers," and was likely "made in jest," according to a Justice Department inspector general report.

Steele, in response, told Stephanopoulos that his collector may have "taken fright" at having his cover blown and tried to "downplay and underestimate" his own reporting when he spoke to the FBI.

Christopher Burrows, Steele's business partner, underscored the importance of seeing the dossier as "raw intelligence ... in the sense that what we sent over was the initial findings."

Pressed by Stephanopoulos about why, if it exists, the supposed pee tape has yet to be released, Steele replied that "it hasn't needed to be released."

"Why not?" Stephanopoulos asked.

"Because," Steele said, "I think the Russians felt they'd got pretty good value out of Donald Trump when he was president of the U.S."
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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JON STEWART Laments that There is Too Much Focus on Donald Trump
News Corpse

It has been six years since Jon Stewart left his post at the Daily Show, disappointing millions of Americans who got humor, insight, and solace from his take on the media and its impact on society. He left a vacuum that still hasn't been filled by his successors in the comedy world during times when political satire was needed more than ever.

Now Stewart has returned to television with a show on AppleTV+ that looks to be a bit more serious. And to promote his new venture, he is making the rounds on the PR circuit, including an appearance on Sunday's State of the Union with Jake Tapper on CNN.

Tapper did an extended interview (video below) of Stewart that touched on many subjects and provided him with a platform to express his ideas about contemporary media and politics. There was much to admire in his commentary. But there was a brief moment where Stewart may have drifted slightly off the mark.......


 

McCloudersportLion

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If U blurt blurt -----reeeeemix----

Catch the deacon dukie cat tryna give you a purple lolly pop in na woods when U were workin 4 bigfoot and stockin shelves,
Then blurta da blurt put on the leather jacket say Aaaayyyyyyy like Coac Klein and launch some Elvis Impersonators and Elves
 

McCloudersportLion

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Sep 5, 2019
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If U blurt blurt -----reeeeemix----

Catch the deacon dukie cat tryna give you a purple lolly pop in na woods when U were workin 4 bigfoot and stockin shelves,
Then blurta da blurt put on the leather jacket say Aaaayyyyyyy like Coac Klein and launch some Elvis Impersonators and
If U blurt blurt -----reeeeemix----

Catch the deacon dukie cat tryna give you a purple lolly pop in na woods when U were workin 4 bigfoot and stockin shelves,
Then blurta da blurt put on the leather jacket say Aaaayyyyyyy like Coac Klein and launch some Elvis Impersonators and Elves

They had sling blade bats too man, potatos with chinese plastic spud guns mai gai
 

McCloudersportLion

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It was an old HBO amish fables tale,

"If he rolly polly was rolling through Lancaster Shire,
To the Wire he got hit in cross traffic amish horse shit crossfire
It must have been time 4 the Soprano Chorus Canoli 2 expire"

His name wasnt Matthew and the chick from 300 Michigan Spartans didnt call him the Wildman Junky- not even
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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FB89XTkVkAADdb1
 
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McCloudersportLion

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"They flu bat at Keaton Hobbes oh they knew
No more hypnotize Mark with clown paint when the Penguin guy flu
He was spinning that black and white dreidle 4 u"

 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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The QAnon movement was always based on neo-Nazi conspiracies. Now the mask is slipping
Hunter

We have noted in the past that the "QAnon" movement is not a set of new conspiracy theories, but a recasting of some of the most popular neo-Nazi, white supremacist, antisemitic themes of the last century for broader conspiracy consumption. Nazi-era antisemitic conspiracy theories declared that "Jews" were secretly controlling the world, that they were working to undermine governments and cultures, and that they drank the blood of children in secret rituals.

QAnon's version is identical: A shadowy cabal of "globalists" is secretly controlling the world, is working to undermine governments and cultures (for example, through a "great replacement" of Americans with new nonwhite immigrants, as supposedly funded by wealthy Jewish American George Soros), and is secretly trafficking children to harvest compounds from their blood. The most bizarre of Nazi and neo-Nazi themes have found eager new homes in the brains of supposed "real" Americans who have invariably settled on the same targets and solutions as their neo-Nazi enablers: Round up the "globalists”—meaning liberals, socialists, Democrats, those who fight for LGBT rights, those who treat immigrants with decency—and jail them. "Lock them up." Purge them.

.........
The "everyday" Americans who have adopted QAnon beliefs as their own, insisting that the "child trafficking" or blood "harvesting" or something-something George Soros conspiracies are real, are Good Nazis. They are the sort of citizens who made Nazi Germany tick. They are sweet, patriotic parents of somebody, or children of somebody, and all they know in life is that their enemies must be defeated, even if defeating them means toppling democracy and/or supporting the most incompetent of tax-dodging lying rapist perverts.

Whether they can be reformed once they've gone down that rabbit hole is a subject for others to engage. Myself, I expect not. Human beings do not accidentally fall into believing their not-white or not-Christian or not-Republican neighbors are barely human saboteurs plotting behind the scenes to do whatever evil you might imagine. They started out that way, then fell into conspiracy holes that were pleasing because they ticked off all the boxes their previous paranoias needed to tick off.

The movement itself, however, has been drifting back to the rawer antisemitism that first crafted it.

VICE News reports that John Sabal, the influential QAnon promoter who will this week host a major QAnon conference at which
four aspiring Republican lawmakers are scheduled to speak recommended on Sunday to his followers a notorious neo-Nazi conspiracy film blaming Jews as the architects of communism, World Wars I and II, and the sabotage of Naziism. "The most important historical film of all time," Sabal touted.

The posts were removed after they were "highlighted by extremist researchers," reports VICE—and Sabal claims through his partner that he never actually watched the film or knew that it was antisemitic. And yes, this is the "QAnon" provocateur with enough clout to collect Republican candidates from across the nation.


This isn't an isolated incident. VICE reports that other QAnon figures have similarly embraced the film, though none as prominent as Sabal has been. The "Q" movement is also attracting much attention and support among German neo-Nazis, who after all have a closer connection to many of the Q-adopted tropes now being exported by American conspiracists.

It hasn't stopped national Republicans from courting conspiracy leaders and allied militias, either.

QAnon may have taken some of its heaviest hits from being uniformly and absurdly wrong in all its pre-election and post-election predictions about, well, everything, and from its top founder and likely Q pretender Ron Watkins, who distanced himself slightly after Trump's loss. (He's now running for Congress himself—in Arizona, of course.) That doesn't mean it's dead.

It's unclear, however, if QAnon believers are becoming more enamored with antisemitism than they once were or if the movement is sloughing off now-bored, less-radical Americans, leaving behind a more radical, neo-Nazi-adjacent core. Conservatism in general is increasingly flirting with antisemitic speech and candidates: In Idaho, a Republican with a long history of antisemitic speech, one who claims "all Jews are dangerous," is enjoying his local party's support for joining the local school board.

Extremist rhetoric in general is being rewarded rather than scorned by Republican voters. It's probably not surprising that the Republican slide into fascism could not help but stoke the same antisemitic sentiments that past versions have relied on. The QAnon, Trump, and Republican movements are all coalescing into one ball of hate and hoaxes; in the House and Senate, party leaders are at worst helping to promote the conspiracies, and at best remaining silent in efforts to ride the hate to new election victories.
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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The Justice Department formally asked the Supreme Court Monday to step in and block a controversial Texas law that bars most abortions after six weeks of pregnancy while legal challenges play out.

The law is "clearly unconstitutional" and allowing it to remain in effect would "perpetuate the ongoing irreparable injury to thousands of Texas women who are being denied their constitutional rights," the Justice Department argues.

The emergency application places the justices back in the center of a firestorm created by the law that bars abortions before most women even know they are pregnant.

The court asked for a response from Texas by noon on Thursday.

In addition to asking the justices to halt the law now, the government also wants the court to agree to hear oral arguments this term and decide for itself whether the law passes constitutional muster. If the justices were to agree to that request, it would raise the stakes in the dispute and bring final resolution to the case by the end of June.

It would also allow the justices to consider the issue with full briefing and oral arguments, instead of having to weigh in on an emergency basis. In September, the first time the Supreme Court allowed the law to go into effect as a part of another challenge, it did so on its emergency docket -- often referred to as the "Shadow docket" -- drawing criticism from those who felt like the justices acted hastily without the benefit of full briefing on the matter......
 
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