10,000 on ignore, Book 197, The Days of Reckoning, Part 56....

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
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US Mint director abruptly resigns
quaoar

Not sure whether there is anything politically significant to this news but the director of the U.S. Mint, which produces the nation’s coins, has abruptly resigned, effective Oct. 1.

David Ryder was appointed in 2018 during the Trump Administration. He was also Mint director briefly at the end of the George H.W. Bush Administration. His tenure has been controversial within the numismatic (coin collecting) community recently for his practice of severely restricting mintages of certain collectible coins, resulting in massive website crashes as coin dealers and collectors rush to try to buy them.

From his Wikipedia page:

During Ryder's second tenure as Mint director, the Mint has generated substantial controversy among coin collectors for its creation and selling of "artificial rarity" coins, or coins created with strict mintage limits. In November 2019, the Mint sold an Enhanced Reverse Proof 2019-S Silver Eagle, which sold out within 20 minutes of release.[6] In November 2020, the Mint sold special 75th Anniversary of World War II Silver Eagle and Gold Eagle proof coins, with mintage limits of 75,000 and 1,945 coins, respectively.

The Treasury Department’s Inspector General’s office had recently announced that it might be looking into the mint’s sales programs.

And Coin World magazine, which caters to collectors, had recently filed an FOI Act request for information about which coin dealers belong to a Mint program that gives dealers special access to purchase coins. The Mint recently denied that FOIA request.

The ABPP (Authorized Bulk Purchase Program) program allows participants to place orders for select numismatic products before the public on-sale date. Ten percent of the maximum mintage of those products is set aside, from which ABPP orders may be placed. The ABPP dealers pay a 5% premium over the Mint’s retail price to the public. The ABPP dealers can pick up their orders from the Mint’s contracted order fulfillment center in Memphis, Tenn.

The new interim director of the Mint will be Alison Doone, the Mint’s chief administrative officer.
 
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Ten Thousan Marbles

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Gen. Milley crushes Sen. Tom Cotton with forceful statement on the role of America's military
Mark Sumner

News that Gen. Mark Milley had exchanged phone calls with Chinese military officials to let them know the U.S. was not planning an attack was greeted with dozens of earnest editorials, like this one in USA Today, explaining why Milley just had to resign. When Milley made statements during the Afghanistan withdrawal that seemed to indicate a slight difference between the timetable he advised and the one that President Joe Biden adopted, Republicans were again outraged that Milley didn’t resign in protest. But of course, Milley had already been declared, as Politico noted back in June, “a villain of the right” when it was revealed that he had pushed back against Trump’s efforts to use the active military to put down Black Lives Matter protests.

Milley, who had been a GOP hero when he strolled across the park to observe Trump waving a Bible over a church from which the priests and parishioners had been driven by military force, had been on the GOP bad list for the better part of a year, despite being hand picked by Trump for his current role. That’s because Milley has, repeatedly, insisted that the military should not be involved in political matters — an anathema to a party that increasingly believes that the role of the military is to support Republicans in what they see as Civil War II.
With that in mind, Republicans certainly came loaded with a double-aught general shot on Tuesday morning when the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff appeared to testify before a Senate panel, with those Chinese phone calls providing the best and shiniest ammunition.

And then Milley made it explicitly and immediately clear that his calls to China were made, in one case, with the full knowledge and support of Trump’s Defense Secretary Mark Esper, and in another with 11 people in the room and a heads-up to both Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.
.......
Far from making the calls in defiance of Trump, Milley made it clear he had phoned to be sure the Chinese military was not getting jitters from some things Trump had said.



“I am certain,” said Gen. Milley, “President Trump did not intend on attacking the Chinese, and it is my directed responsibility to convey presidential orders and intent. My task at that time was to deescalate. […] At no time was I attempting to change or influence the process, usurp authority, or insert myself into the chain of command.”

All of this did not, of course, cause Republicans to immediately drop their pitchforks. Because Milley, having maintained the political neutrality of the military, represents everything that the GOP considers wrong in a modern American general. It did make Republicans tone down the tenor of their exchange. It didn’t make them any more fond of the answers.

That included the answer Milley gave to Sen. Tom Cotton when Cotton tried to make resigning over Afghanistan some kind of patriotic duty. Milley didn’t just answer the question, he gave an answer that quieted Cotton and underlined how the general sees his role in the nation. It’s an answer that deserves to be studied. And repeated.

“As a senior military officer, resigning is a very serious thing. It’s a political act. My job is to provide advice. My statutory responsibility is to provide legal advice, or the best military advice, to the president, and that’s my legal requirement. That’s what the law is.

The president doesn’t have to agree with that advice. He doesn’t have to make those decisions just because we’re generals. It would be an incredible act of political defiance for a commissioned officer to just resign because my advice was not taken.

This country doesn’t want generals figuring out what orders we’re going to accept or not; that’s not our job. The principle of civilian control of the military is absolute. It’s critical to this republic.

In addition to that, from a personal standpoint, my dad didn’t get a chance to resign at Iwo Jima, and those kids there at Abbey Gate, they don’t get a choice to resign. And I’m not going to turn my back on them. They can’t resign, so I’m not going to resign. There’s no way.

If the orders are illegal, we’re in a different place. But if the orders are legal, from civilian authority, I intend to carry them out.”




When Milley followed Trump across the street from the White House, he gathered a lot of criticism on this site—some of it extremely serious. Milley’s insistence that he was unaware of the nature of those events until he was caught in the middle of them was difficult to swallow, and his apologies over appearing in the midst of a political event as a uniformed military officer were hard to accept.

Since then, information has repeatedly made it clear that, just as he said on Tuesday, Milley takes the apolitical role of the military extremely seriously. And that he considers resignation from the military to be a political act reserved for only the most exigent of circumstances. Which gives claims that he considered exactly that rather than accept orders to involve the military in a scheme to reinforce Trump’s attempts to hold onto power, much more impact
 

jjw165

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Jan 18, 2005
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The nickname of the twitter poster is ‘Mueller she wrote’.
lol That’s nifty.
 

Lion8286

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Sep 1, 2008
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Gen. Milley crushes Sen. Tom Cotton with forceful statement on the role of America's military
Mark Sumner

News that Gen. Mark Milley had exchanged phone calls with Chinese military officials to let them know the U.S. was not planning an attack was greeted with dozens of earnest editorials, like this one in USA Today, explaining why Milley just had to resign. When Milley made statements during the Afghanistan withdrawal that seemed to indicate a slight difference between the timetable he advised and the one that President Joe Biden adopted, Republicans were again outraged that Milley didn’t resign in protest. But of course, Milley had already been declared, as Politico noted back in June, “a villain of the right” when it was revealed that he had pushed back against Trump’s efforts to use the active military to put down Black Lives Matter protests.

Milley, who had been a GOP hero when he strolled across the park to observe Trump waving a Bible over a church from which the priests and parishioners had been driven by military force, had been on the GOP bad list for the better part of a year, despite being hand picked by Trump for his current role. That’s because Milley has, repeatedly, insisted that the military should not be involved in political matters — an anathema to a party that increasingly believes that the role of the military is to support Republicans in what they see as Civil War II.
With that in mind, Republicans certainly came loaded with a double-aught general shot on Tuesday morning when the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff appeared to testify before a Senate panel, with those Chinese phone calls providing the best and shiniest ammunition.

And then Milley made it explicitly and immediately clear that his calls to China were made, in one case, with the full knowledge and support of Trump’s Defense Secretary Mark Esper, and in another with 11 people in the room and a heads-up to both Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.
.......
Far from making the calls in defiance of Trump, Milley made it clear he had phoned to be sure the Chinese military was not getting jitters from some things Trump had said.



“I am certain,” said Gen. Milley, “President Trump did not intend on attacking the Chinese, and it is my directed responsibility to convey presidential orders and intent. My task at that time was to deescalate. […] At no time was I attempting to change or influence the process, usurp authority, or insert myself into the chain of command.”

All of this did not, of course, cause Republicans to immediately drop their pitchforks. Because Milley, having maintained the political neutrality of the military, represents everything that the GOP considers wrong in a modern American general. It did make Republicans tone down the tenor of their exchange. It didn’t make them any more fond of the answers.


That included the answer Milley gave to Sen. Tom Cotton when Cotton tried to make resigning over Afghanistan some kind of patriotic duty. Milley didn’t just answer the question, he gave an answer that quieted Cotton and underlined how the general sees his role in the nation. It’s an answer that deserves to be studied. And repeated.

“As a senior military officer, resigning is a very serious thing. It’s a political act. My job is to provide advice. My statutory responsibility is to provide legal advice, or the best military advice, to the president, and that’s my legal requirement. That’s what the law is.

The president doesn’t have to agree with that advice. He doesn’t have to make those decisions just because we’re generals. It would be an incredible act of political defiance for a commissioned officer to just resign because my advice was not taken.

This country doesn’t want generals figuring out what orders we’re going to accept or not; that’s not our job. The principle of civilian control of the military is absolute. It’s critical to this republic.

In addition to that, from a personal standpoint, my dad didn’t get a chance to resign at Iwo Jima, and those kids there at Abbey Gate, they don’t get a choice to resign. And I’m not going to turn my back on them. They can’t resign, so I’m not going to resign. There’s no way.


If the orders are illegal, we’re in a different place. But if the orders are legal, from civilian authority, I intend to carry them out.”





When Milley followed Trump across the street from the White House, he gathered a lot of criticism on this site—some of it extremely serious. Milley’s insistence that he was unaware of the nature of those events until he was caught in the middle of them was difficult to swallow, and his apologies over appearing in the midst of a political event as a uniformed military officer were hard to accept.

Since then, information has repeatedly made it clear that, just as he said on Tuesday, Milley takes the apolitical role of the military extremely seriously. And that he considers resignation from the military to be a political act reserved for only the most exigent of circumstances. Which gives claims that he considered exactly that rather than accept orders to involve the military in a scheme to reinforce Trump’s attempts to hold onto power, much more impact

Uh oh, Marbles. Milley contradicts Biden. SInce you're a Milley guy, I guess you're calling Biden a liar?? lol

 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
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  • Haha
Reactions: Hotshoe

Ten Thousan Marbles

Well-Known Member
Feb 6, 2014
86,004
17,374
1
The nickname of the twitter poster is ‘Mueller she wrote’.
lol That’s nifty.
Has proven to be a good source, always on top of current news, recommended to me by my estate atty.

Regardless of one's political lean, checking in on her tweets is a good way to keep up to date on breaking news.
 

Lion8286

Well-Known Member
Sep 1, 2008
13,646
18,946
1
Has proven to be a good source, always on top of current news, recommended to me by my estate atty.

Regardless of one's political lean, checking in on her tweets is a good way to keep up to date on breaking news.

LULZ. She's about as unbiased as you are, Marbles.
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
86,004
17,374
1


Police union claims ‘dozens’ to resign over vaccine mandate, state says only one has so far
Rebekah Sager

73F31525-376E-4B2B-AD8A-54EAAA3CAC20.gif
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
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  • Donald Trump lost a battle to enforce a nondisclosure agreement with “Apprentice” contestant Omarosa Manigault Newman over a tell-all book she wrote about her brief stint in the White House.
  • An arbitrator agreed with Manigault Newman’s argument that the nondisclosure agreement she signed while working for Trump’s 2016 campaign is “invalid under New York contract law.”
  • John Phillips, Manigault Newman’s attorney, told CNBC: “So finally someone has beat him at his own game and in his own forum.”
............
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Trump's losing streak continues with Omarosa Manigault Newman NDA suit over tell-all book
Rebekah Sager

 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
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So sad: Trump keeps making life tough for Republicans, as Texas election audit demand shows
Laura Clawson

When Donald Trump demanded that Texas conduct its own fake election audit, Gov. Greg Abbott’s public position was that it was no big deal because Texas was already doing exactly what Trump was asking. But—surprise!—Politico reports there was a “mad dash” in Abbott’s office to figure out how to make Trump happy without screwing up too many things.

Trump's public order, “Governor Abbott, we need a ‘Forensic Audit of the 2020 Election,” came just hours ahead of the report showing that even the partisan Republican fraudit effort could find no fraud in Maricopa County, Arizona. Trump demanded that Texas pass a specific election bill during its special session. There were other priorities for the special session, though, so “[t]here was a mad dash to determine if Trump was actually being serious with his statement and it was decided this was the best route to take without blowing up the special session,” according to a “Texas political aide familiar with how the process played out.”
.......
Texas officials tried to play it cool. According to a statement from the secretary of state’s office the same day, “the Secretary of State has the authority to conduct a full and comprehensive forensic audit of any election and has already begun the process in Texas’ two largest Democrat counties and two largest Republican counties.” In fact, three of the counties under audit had been won by President Joe Biden in 2020.

Abbott similarly made the public claim that he was already doing the thing Trump wanted, more or less, even if he wasn’t pressing to pass the specific bill Trump wanted. Audits “began months ago,” he said on Fox News.

But, whoops, election officials in at least one of the counties under audit—for months, supposedly—found out that they were being audited from that Thursday press release from the secretary of state’s office. Not only that, but “[o]ne Texas official told CNN that even officials inside the secretary of state's office were unaware of any audit underway.”

Gosh, it sure sounds like Trump’s demand caught Texas Republicans off guard, which makes sense, because why would Trump demand an investigation, out of the blue, into the votes in a state he won by six points? That must be one of the fun things about being a high-level Republican these days: The guy who rules your world might at any moment make a bizarre demand, and you know you have to make a big show of obeying it lest he attack you—with his mob eagerly joining the attacks.

Trump said jump. Greg Abbott insisted state officials were already jumping, while his staff scrambled to figure out exactly how high Trump wanted them to jump.
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
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Pfizer has turned over the data from vaccine trials on kids under 12. What's next is up to the FDA
Mark Sumner

On Tuesday morning, Pfizer and BioNTech announced that they have submitted initial results from the Phase 2/3 trial of their COVID-19 vaccine on children between 5 and 12 to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This follows an announcement last week in which the companies reported that a dose of 10 micrograms (about one-third the dose given to adults) generated a strong immune response and good safety data. The companies have now submitted this data to the FDA in the U.S., and plan to submit it to the European Medicines Agency in coming weeks.

The Tuesday submission pushed the drug company to the very end of the “sometime in September” window it had set for itself over the summer. In the first phase of vaccine development, Pfizer submitted its information to the FDA on Nov. 20, the panel of outside experts met to give their approval on Dec. 10, and the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) just one day later on Dec. 11. If the approval of the vaccine for those under 12 holds to a similar timeline, the first children could be receiving their vaccines well before Halloween.

However, it’s not clear if the FDA evaluation will run as smoothly or as quickly as the original approval for adults. In June, both the FDA and CDC added warnings about rare instances of myocarditis and pericarditis (inflammation in or near the heart) associated with both the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. These instances were more common in younger people, though at every age they were far below the rates of heart damage caused by COVID-19.

In any case, there have already been concerns expressed that the 2,268 participants in the trial may not be sufficient to uncover rare issues that affect children. How this will affect the outside panel’s decisions isn’t clear, but with over 5,700,000 cases of COVID-19 among American children, including over 200,000 cases in just the past week, infections have been increasing rapidly since the start of the school year. Despite concerns about rare side effects, it’s expected that the FDA will approve the best preventative measure for an all-too-common disease.
.......
Like the adult vaccine, the dose given to children is delivered as two injections spaced 21 days apart. Though there is some immune response within days of the first shot, the benefits of full vaccination aren’t available until some time after the second shot. So it’s unlikely that many children will be enjoying peak protection before Thanksgiving.

However, assuming an EUA is issued in October and pediatric doses of vaccine begin to roll out across the nation soon after, there should be good availability before the new year. That leaves open the possibility that as schools bring back students from their holiday break in January, vaccine requirements could be a common for students in kindergarten through college.

Currently, the CDC recommendations do not suggest that schools mandate vaccination. However, the primary reason is that many schools—particularly schools in smaller, rural areas—serve students under 12 in the same building as older students. Following an EUA for children down to age 5, this obstacle will drop away and universal vaccination could easily be added to the CDC recommendations.

In the meantime, the CDC does recommend universal vaccination for staff members, and universal masking for both students and staff. Recent CDC studies have shown that schools with mask mandates are much less likely to have to close because of COVID-19 outbreaks, that communities connected to these schools are less likely to be affected by community spread, and that rates of both infection and hospitalization of students is reduced.

Unfortunately, the list of schools that require masking is limited, especially since multiple Republican governors have attempted to prevent school boards from being able to take this step in protecting students. Similarly, the list of colleges that currently require COVID-19 vaccine for all students shows some sharp geographic boundaries. Though there are dozens of such schools in many states, there are exactly none in Idaho, or Arkansas. or Kansas, or North Dakota, or South Dakota, or Wyoming. Other states, such as Florida, have only one or two schools where vaccination is required.

There’s really no excuse for colleges not to require vaccinations against COVID-19—especially since almost all of these schools require vaccination for a half-dozen or more other diseases. But should the EUA get issued and the CDC revise their guidance, it could usher in a wave of vaccinations at schools from primary grades on.


Defeating diseases like mumps or the measles takes a very high level of vaccination. The same is true of COVID-19. That level of vaccination can only be achieved if children are included in the ranks of the vaccinated. And vaccinating kids is one of the things that models suggest could help the U.S. avoid another “winter spike” in cases and keep trending down toward finally getting this disease under control.