10,000 on ignore, Book 190, The Days of Reckoning, Part 49.....

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Ten Thousan Marbles

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Ten Thousan Marbles

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Feb 6, 2014
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Stephen Miller is not at all impressed with the thousands of people we've rescued from Afghanistan
Aldous J Pennyfarthing

Xenophobic narwhal penis Stephen Miller is not ready to give the Biden administration credit for the huge number of friendlies it’s rescued from Afghanistan. That may be because so many of them are Afghans. Which means they’re not Americans. Which means—in his diseased, Machiavellian mind, anyway—they don’t really count.

Miller, who was instrumental in blocking our Afghan allies from entering the U.S. for years before the war’s end, appears to be sore that so many of them are finding their way stateside now. And he really doesn’t want their families along for the ride because … erm … immigration is bad or something.

Well, hey, at least he’s being consistent and not trying to pretend his old boss Donald Trump would have airlifted every non-Taliban Afghan out of the country far in advance of the fall of Kabul.



Really? People who aided our war effort at grave risk to themselves and their families want to bring those family members with them? Hie thee to thine fainting couch!

So airlifting 117,000 people from a danger zone under fraught conditions isn’t so impressive—because they’re the wrong people, apparently.

I don’t know about you, but I’d trade one Stephen Miller for 100,000 Afghans any day of the week. Like most immigrants, the Afghans we welcome to our country are bound to contribute mightily to its future success. As for Miller? Well, he’s already proven himself worse than worthless.

 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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Some of the world’s biggest tech companies have committed tens of billions of dollars to improving supply chain security, closing industry skills gaps and driving security awareness among the public, according to the White House.

As reported by Infosecurity yesterday, the Biden administration welcomed the CEOs of Microsoft, Apple, Google, IBM and others to a meeting yesterday to discuss the “whole-of-nation” effort needed to address cybersecurity threats.”

The result of that encounter has been a series of commitments from these firms, including $10bn from Google over the next five years to expand zero trust and improve supply chain and open source security. The tech giant will apparently also help 100,000 Americans earn “digital skills certificates.”

IBM said it would train 150,000 people in cyber skills over the coming three years and focus on improving the diversity of the security workforce, while Microsoft has committed $20bn over five years to drive security by design, and $150m for federal, local and state governments.

Apple will establish a new program to improve supply chain security, including among its 9000 US suppliers, with multi-factor authentication (MFA), vulnerability remediation, event logging and incident response all playing a key role.

Amazon is making MFA devices available to all AWS customers and rolling out the security training it offers employees to the general public.

Aside from these commitments, the White House announced the expansion of its Industrial Control Systems Cybersecurity Initiative, from the electricity sector to natural gas pipelines, and said the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) would develop a new framework for supply chain security.

In another potentially significant move, insurer Resilience said it would require policyholders to meet a threshold of cybersecurity best practice as a condition of receiving coverage — something experts have been demanding for some time across the industry.

“I’m especially excited to see that Resilience is requiring minimum cybersecurity standards as a condition of coverage,” argued Jake Williams, co-founder and CTO at BreachQuest. “Many organizations view cyber-insurance as an alternative to implementing security controls rather than as a complement to those controls.”

There were also pledges from several education providers to help improve security awareness among the public and grow America’s cyber workforce. The White House claimed it currently has a skills shortage of nearly 500,000 professionals.

“We applaud Amazon’s commitment to make security awareness training available at no charge and to deliver multi-factor authentication (MFA) to all Amazon Web Services account holders. Such basic defenses should be in place everywhere,” argued Jack Kudale, founder and CEO of Cowbell Cyber.

“The security crisis is acute within the small and mid-size business segment. Incentives to drive change and adoption of fundamental cyber-hygiene practices including cybersecurity and cyber-insurance will change the balance of power between businesses and cyber-criminals.”
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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President Joe Biden made a solemn trip to Dover Air Force Base early Sunday to mourn with families of 13 service members killed in a suicide blast in Afghanistan as their remains returned to the United States.

It is the gravest task to fall on any American president and is the first time Biden has attended a "dignified transfer" since taking office seven months ago.

The President and first lady Jill Biden will meet with the families of those killed, according to the White House, prior to the transfer at noon ET......
 

Ten Thousan Marbles

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The Taliban said that a U.S. airstrike targeted a suicide bomber in a vehicle Sunday who wanted to attack the Kabul international airport amid the American military’s evacuation there.

There were few initial details about the incident, as well as a rocket that struck a neighborhood just northwest of the airport, killing a child. The two strikes initially appeared to be separate incidents, though information on both remained scarce.

The attack comes as the United States winds down a historic airlift that saw tens of thousands evacuated from Kabul’s international airport, the scene of much of the chaos that engulfed the Afghan capital since the Taliban took over two weeks ago. After an Islamic State affiliate’s suicide attack that killed over 180 people, the Taliban increased its security around the airfield as Britain ended its evacuation flights Saturday.

U.S. military cargo planes continued their runs into the airport Sunday, ahead of a Tuesday deadline earlier set by President Joe Biden to withdraw all troops from America’s longest war. However, Afghans remaining behind in the country worry about the Taliban reverting to their earlier oppressive rule — something fueled by the recent shooting death of a folk singer in the country by the insurgents.
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Zabihullah Mujahid said in a message to journalists that the strike targeted the bomber as he drove a vehicle loaded with explosives. Mujahid offered few other details.

U.S. military officials could not be immediately reached for comment.

The rocket attack meanwhile struck Kabul’s Khuwja Bughra neighborhood, said Rashid, the Kabul police chief who goes by one name. Video obtained by The Associated Press in the aftermath of the attack showed smoke rising from building at the site around a kilometer (half a mile) from the airport.

No group immediately claimed the attack, however militants have fired rockets in the past.
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Meanwhile, the family of a folk singer north of Kabul say the Taliban killed him.

The shooting of Fawad Andarabi came in the Andarabi Valley for which he was named, an area of Baghlan province some 100 kilometers (60 miles) north of Kabul. The valley had seen upheaval since the Taliban takeover, with some districts in the area coming under the control of militia fighters opposed to the Taliban rule. The Taliban say they have since retaken those areas, though neighboring Panjshir in the Hindu Kush mountains remains the only one of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces not under its control.

The Taliban previously came out to Andarabi’s home and searched it, even drinking tea with the musician, his son Jawad Andarabi told the AP. But something changed Friday.

“He was innocent, a singer who only was entertaining people,” his son said. “They shot him in the head on the farm.”

His son said he wanted justice and that a local Taliban council promised to punish his father’s killer.

Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid told the AP that the insurgents would investigate the incident, but had no other details on the killing.

Andarabi played the ghichak, a bowed lute, and sang traditional songs about his birthplace, his people and Afghanistan as a whole. A video online showed him at one performance, sitting on a rug with the mountains of home surrounding him as he sang.

“There is no country in the world like my homeland, a proud nation,” he sang. “Our beautiful valley, our great-grandparents’ homeland.”

Karima Bennoune, the United Nations special rapporteur on cultural rights, wrote on Twitter that she had “grave concern” over Andarabi’s killing.

“We call on governments to demand the Taliban respect the #humanrights of #artists,” she wrote.

Agnes Callamard, the secretary-general of Amnesty International, similarly decried the killing.

“There is mounting evidence that the Taliban of 2021 is the same as the intolerant, violent, repressive Taliban of 2001,” she wrote on Twitter. “20 years later. Nothing has changed on that front.”

Meanwhile on Sunday, private banks across Afghanistan resumed their operations. However, they limited withdrawals to no more than the equivalent of $200 a day.

While some complained of still being unable to access their money, government employees say they haven’t been paid over the last four months. The Afghani traded around 90.5 to $1, continuing its depreciation as billions of dollars in the country’s reserves remain frozen overseas.


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Ten Thousan Marbles

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White House Announces John D. Porcari as Port Envoy to the Biden-⁠Harris Administration Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force​


WASHINGTON – Today, the White House announced that John D. Porcari will be the Port Envoy to the Biden-Harris Administration Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force.

The Task Force was established in June to address supply and demand mismatches that emerged in several sectors as the economy reawakened following the Administration’s historic vaccination and economic relief efforts. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg leads the Task Force focus on ports and trucking issues. The Task Force’s leadership also includes Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on food and agriculture and Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo on homebuilding and semiconductors.


“The strength of the U.S. economic recovery has tested the near-term capacity of our supply chains, and the Administration is operating on all fronts to ease bottlenecks and facilitate the flow of goods across the country,” said NEC Director Brian Deese. “Our country’s ports are the gateways for getting goods to market, which makes the appointment of John Porcari as Ports Envoy an especially important step forward in alleviating these disruptions that are impacting consumers, workers, and businesses alike.”

Since the launch of the Task Force, Secretary Buttigieg and the Department of Transportation have been engaged in extensive outreach and engagement with port stakeholders including virtual round table held in July with representatives of all aspects of the ports’ supply chain. Out of this work, it has become clear that the challenges at our ports, some of which have existed for years, require dedicated focus by experienced, senior leadership to drive toward outcomes that will reduce congestion, improve operations and set us on a sustainable path for the future. John Porcari is uniquely qualified to take on this role.

Envoy Porcari will work closely with Secretary Buttigieg and his team at the Department of Transportation as well as the National Economic Council to address the congestion at U.S. ports. Disruptions in global shipping and rapid shifts in demand have led the cost of shipping containers between China and the West Coast to grow more than 90% compared to 2019. This congestion is being felt particularly acutely at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which together handle the largest share of containerized cargo moving through U.S. ports. Port workers and terminals have handled containerized cargo volumes that rose 40% in the first half of this year compared to the same time last year. Envoy Porcari will work with these stakeholder and others at the ports to address the backlog and associated delivery delays and product shortages being experienced by American consumers and businesses.

In addition, to Porcari’s work, the Biden Administration has negotiated an historic $17 billion in investments in port infrastructure as part of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal. The funding would help address congestion and supply chains over time by investing in repair and maintenance backlogs and reduce congestion and emissions near ports.

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John D. Porcari, Port Envoy to the White House Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force, Department of Transportation


John D. Porcari is a nationally recognized public and private sector infrastructure leader, who has delivered some of America’s most challenging projects and driven the adoption of equitable, community-serving infrastructure policies and projects at the local, state and federal levels.

As Deputy Secretary and Chief Operating Officer of the Department of Transportation in the Obama-Biden administration (2009-2014), Porcari was directly involved in overseeing port, intermodal, maritime policy and maritime-related competitive grant programs throughout the United States.

In a previous role, serving twice as Secretary of Transportation for the State of Maryland and Chairman of the Maryland Port Commission (1999-2003 and 2006-2009), Porcari initiated a strategic plan for the Port of Baltimore that built it into the largest ro/ro (roll on/roll off) port in the nation, exporting construction and agricultural machinery from the Midwest to the world and growing the port into one of the nation’s top ten in terms of both dollar value and tonnage.

Under Porcari’s leadership, the Port of Baltimore also entered into a pioneering public-private partnership to expand its Seagirt container terminal, adding a fourth, 50-foot container berth and state of the art cranes to accommodate the newest super-post-panamax container vessels. This 50-year, $1.3 billion dollar P3, with the strong support of labor, has become a national model.